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Given the following class

public class Foo
{
    public int FooId { get; set; }
    public string FooName { get; set; }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        Foo fooItem = obj as Foo;

        return fooItem.FooId == this.FooId;
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        // Which is preferred?

        return base.GetHashCode();

        //return this.FooId.GetHashCode();
    }
}

I have overridden the Equals method because Foo represent a row for the Foos table. Which is the preferred method for overriding the GetHashCode?

Why is it important to override GetHashCode?

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5  
It s important to implement both equals and gethashcode, due to collisions, in particular while using dictionaries. if two object returns same hashcode, they are inserted in the dictionary with chaining. While accessing the item equals method is used. –  DarthVader Jun 20 '11 at 14:34

11 Answers 11

up vote 487 down vote accepted

Yes, it is important if your item will be used as a key in a dictionary, or HashSet<T>, etc - since this is used (in the absense of a custom IEqualityComparer<T>) to group items into buckets. If the hash-code for two items does not match, they may never be considered equal (Equals will simply never be called).

The GetHashCode() method should reflect the Equals logic; the rules are:

  • if two things are equal (Equals(...) == true) then they must return the same value for GetHashCode()
  • if the GetHashCode() is equal, it is not necessary for them to be the same; this is a collision, and Equals will be called to see if it is a real equality or not.

In this case, it looks like "return FooId;" is a suitable GetHashCode() implementation. If you are testing multiple properties, it is common to combine them using code like below, to reduce diagonal collisions (i.e. so that new Foo(3,5) has a different hash-code to new Foo(5,3)):

int hash = 13;
hash = (hash * 7) + field1.GetHashCode();
hash = (hash * 7) + field2.GetHashCode();
...
return hash;

Oh - for convenience, you might also consider providing == and != operators when overriding Equals and GethashCode.


A demonstration of what happens when you get this wrong is here.

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12  
Can I ask ahy are you multiplying with such factors? –  Leandro López Jan 16 '09 at 10:30
7  
Actually, I could probably lose one of them; the point is to try to minimise the number of collisions - so that an object {1,0,0} has a different hash to {0,1,0} and {0,0,1} (if you see what I mean), –  Marc Gravell Jan 16 '09 at 13:45
4  
I tweaked the numbers to make it clearer (and added a seed). Some code uses different numbers - for example the C# compiler (for anonymous types) uses a seed of 0x51ed270b and a factor of -1521134295. –  Marc Gravell Jan 16 '09 at 13:49
25  
@Leandro López: Usually the factors are chosen to be prime numbers because it makes the number of collisions smaller. –  Andrei Rînea Oct 22 '10 at 23:25
8  
"Oh - for convenience, you might also consider providing == and != operators when overriding Equals and GethashCode.": Microsoft discourages implementing operator== for objects that are not immutable - msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173147.aspx - " It is not a good idea to override operator == in non-immutable types." –  antiduh May 9 '12 at 20:04

It's actually very hard to implement GetHashCode() correctly because, in addition to the rules Marc already mentioned, the hash code should not change during the lifetime of an object. Therefore the fields which are used to calculate the hash code must be immutable.

I finally found a solution to this problem when I was working with NHibernate. My approach is to calculate the hash code from the ID of the object. The ID can only be set though the constructor so if you want to change the ID, which is very unlikely, you have to create a new object which has a new ID and therefore a new hash code. This approach works best with GUIDs because you can provide a parameterless constructor which randomly generates an ID.

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2  
Can you elaborate on "the hash code should not change during the lifetime of an object"? Is this NHibernate specific? –  vanja. Dec 8 '10 at 3:08
11  
@vanja. I believe it has to do with: if you add the object to a dictionary and then change the object's id, when fetching later you will be using a different hash to retrieve it so you will never get it from the dictionary. –  ANeves Dec 21 '10 at 16:18
10  
Microsoft's documentation of the GetHashCode() function neither states nor implies that the object hash must remain consistent over it's lifetime. In fact, it specifically explains one permissible case in which it might not: "The GetHashCode method for an object must consistently return the same hash code as long as there is no modification to the object state that determines the return value of the object's Equals method." –  PeterAllenWebb Oct 4 '12 at 18:44
9  
"the hash code should not change during the lifetime of an object" - that is not true. –  zgnilec Mar 29 '13 at 11:23
2  
@ScottChamberlain I think you forgot NOT in your comment, it should be: "the hash code (nor the evaulation of equals) should NOT change during the period the object is used as a key for a collection". Right? –  Stanislav Prokop Apr 27 at 19:33

By overriding Equals you're basically stating that you are the one who knows better how to compare two instances of a given type, so you're likely to be the best candidate to provide the best hash code.

This is an example of how ReSharper writes a GetHashCode() function for you:

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        unchecked
        {
            var result = 0;
            result = (result * 397) ^ m_someVar1;
            result = (result * 397) ^ m_someVar2;
            result = (result * 397) ^ m_someVar3;
            result = (result * 397) ^ m_someVar4;
            return result;
        }
    }

As you can see it just tries to guess a good hash code based on all the fields in the class, but since you know your object's domain or value ranges you could still provide a better one.

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4  
Won't this always return zero? Probably should initialise result to 1! Also needs a few more semi-colons. –  Sam Mackrill Feb 21 '12 at 14:14
6  
You are aware of what the XOR operator (^) does? –  Stephen Drew Apr 9 '12 at 11:19
1  
As I said, this is what R# writes for you (at least it's what it did back in 2008) when asked to. Obviously, this snippet is intended to be tweaked by the programmer in some way. As for the missing semi-colons... yeah, looks like I left them out when I copy-pasted the code from a region selection in Visual Studio. I also thought people would figure it out both. –  Trap Apr 13 '12 at 12:11
3  
@SamMackrill I've added in the missing semi-colons. –  Matthew Murdoch Apr 3 '13 at 20:14
    
@MatthewMurdoch Thanks :) –  Trap Apr 14 at 13:29

How about

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return string.Format("{0}_{1}_{2}", prop1, prop2, prop3).GetHashCode();
    }

Assuming performance is not an issue :)

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1  
erm - but you're returning a string for an int based method ;_0 –  jim tollan Feb 17 '11 at 12:23
17  
No, he does call GetHashCode() from the String object, which returns an int. –  Richard Clayton Apr 25 '11 at 12:26
1  
I dont expect this to be as fast as I would like to be, not just for the boxing involved for value types, but also for the performance of string.Format. Another geeky one I have seen is new { prop1, prop2, prop3 }.GetHashCode(). Cant comment though which one would be slower between these two. Do not abuse tools. –  nawfal Dec 15 '13 at 10:33
2  
This will return true for { prop1="_X", prop2="Y", prop3="Z" } and { prop1="", prop2="X_Y", prop3="Z_" }. You probably don't want that. –  voetsjoeba Jan 2 at 19:43

Please don´t forget to check the obj parameter against null when overriding Equals(). And also compare the type.

public override bool Equals(object obj)
{
    if (obj == null || GetType() != obj.GetType())
        return false;

    Foo fooItem = obj as Foo;

    return fooItem.FooId == this.FooId;
}

The reason for this is: Equals must return false on comparison to null. See also http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bsc2ak47.aspx

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2  
This check for type will fail in the situation where a subclass refers to the superclass Equals method as part of it's own comparison (i.e. base.Equals(obj)) - should use as instead –  sweetfa Aug 21 '12 at 2:55
    
@sweetfa: It depends on how the Equals method of the subclass is implemented. It could also call base.Equals((BaseType)obj)) which would be working fine. –  huha Aug 27 '13 at 10:03
1  
No it won't: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.object.gettype.aspx. And besides, the implementation of a method should not fail or succeed depending on the way it is called. If the runtime-type of an object is a subclass of some baseclass then the Equals() of the baseclass should return true if obj indeed is equal to this no matter how Equals() of the baseclass was called. –  BitJunky Sep 24 '13 at 20:57

It is because the framework requires that two objects that are the same must have the same hashcode. If you override the equals method to do a special comparison of two objects and the two objects are considered the same by the method, then the hash code of the two objects must also be the same. (Dictionaries and Hashtables rely on this principle).

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We have two problems to cope with.

  1. You notnot provide a sensible GetHashCode() if any field in the object can be changed. Also often a object will NEVER be used in a collection that depends on GetHashCode(). So the cost of implementing GetHashCode() is often not worth it, or it is not possible.

  2. If someone puts your object in a collection that calls GetHashCode() and you have overrided Equals() without also making GetHashCode() behave in a correct way, that person may spend days tracking down the problem.

Therefore by default I do.

public class Foo
{
    public int FooId { get; set; }
    public string FooName { get; set; }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        Foo fooItem = obj as Foo;

        return fooItem.FooId == this.FooId;
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        // Some comment to explain if there is a real problem with providing GetHashCode() 
        // or if I just don't see a need for it for the given class
        throw new Exception("Sorry I don't know what GetHashCode should do for this class");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Throwing an exception from GetHashCode is a violation of the Object contract. There is no difficulty defining a GetHashCode function such that any two objects which are equal return the same hash code; return 24601; and return 8675309; would both be valid implementations of GetHashCode. Performance of Dictionary will only be decent when the number of items is small, and will get very bad if the number of items gets large, but it will work correctly in any case. –  supercat Dec 19 '13 at 7:11
    
@supercat, It is not possible to implement GetHashCode in a sensible way if the identify fields in the object can change, as the hash code must never change. Doing what you say could lead someone having to spend many days tracking down the performance problem, then many weeks on a large system redesigning to remove the use of the dictionaries. –  Ian Ringrose Dec 19 '13 at 9:41
    
I used to do something like this for all classes I defined that needed Equals(), and where I was completely sure I'd never use that object as a key in a collection. Then one day a program where I'd used an object like that as input to a DevExpress XtraGrid control crashed. It turns out XtraGrid, behind my back, was creating a HashTable or something based on my objects. I got into a minor argument with the DevExpress support people about this. I said it was not smart that they based their component's functionality and reliability on an unknown customer implementation of an obscure method. –  RenniePet Jun 29 at 4:27
    
The DevExpress people were rather snarky, basically saying I must be an idiot to throw an exception in a GetHashCode() method. I still think they should find an alternative method of doing what they're doiing - I recall Marc Gravell on a different thread describing how he builds a dictionary of arbitrary objects without being dependent on GetHashCode() - can't recall how he did it though. –  RenniePet Jun 29 at 4:32
    
@RenniePet, must better having a crush due to throwing an exception, then having a very hard to find bug due to an invalid implementation. –  Ian Ringrose Jun 29 at 19:53

It's not necessarily important; it depends on the size of your collections and your performance requirements and whether your class will be used in a library where you may not know the performance requirements. I frequently know my collection sizes are not very large and my time is more valuable than a few microseconds of performance gained by creating a perfect hash code; so (to get rid of the annoying warning by the compiler) I simply use:

   public override int GetHashCode()
   {
      return base.GetHashCode();
   }

(Of course I could use a #pragma to turn off the warning as well but I prefer this way.)

When you are in the position that you do need the performance than all of the issues mentioned by others here apply, of course. Most important - otherwise you will get wrong results when retrieving items from a hash set or dictionary: the hash code must not vary with the life time of an object (more accurately, during the time whenever the hash code is needed, such as while being a key in a dictionary): for example, the following is wrong as Value is public and so can be changed externally to the class during the life time of the instance, so you must not use it as the basis for the hash code:


   class A
   {
      public int Value;

      public override int GetHashCode()
      {
         return Value.GetHashCode(); //WRONG! Value is not constant during the instance's life time
      }
   }    

On the other hand, if Value can't be changed it's ok to use:


   class A
   {
      public readonly int Value;

      public override int GetHashCode()
      {
         return Value.GetHashCode(); //OK  Value is read-only and can't be changed during the instance's life time
      }
   }

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1  
Downvoted. This is plain wrong. Even Microsoft states in MSDN (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.object.gethashcode.aspx) that the value of GetHashCode MUST change when the object state changes in a way that may affect the return value of a call to Equals(), and even in its examples it also shows GetHashCode implementations that fully depend on publicly changeable values. –  Sebastian P.R. Gingter May 22 '13 at 9:27
    
Sebastian, I disagree: If you add an object to a collection that uses hash codes it will be put in a bin dependent on the hash code. If you now change the hash code you will not find the object again in the collection as the wrong bin will be searched. This is, in fact, something that has happened in our code and that's why I found it necessary to point that out. –  ILoveFortran May 24 '13 at 12:19
    
Sebastian, In addition, I cannot see a statement in the link (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.object.gethashcode.aspx) that GetHashCode() must change. In contrary - it must NOT change as long as Equals returns the same value for the same argument: "The GetHashCode method for an object must consistently return the same hash code as long as there is no modification to the object state that determines the return value of the object's Equals method. " This statement does not imply the opposite, that it must change if the return value for Equals changes. –  ILoveFortran May 24 '13 at 12:45
    
@ILoveFortran, I don't think what you're saying is correct. The MSDN article to clearly states: "A hash code is not a permanent value. For this reason: 1)Do not serialize hash code values or store them in databases. 2) Do not use the hash code as the key to retrieve an object from a keyed collection. 3... 4...", ie, the HasCode changes during the lifetime of the object and your code needs to be aware of that. If you want to make each object unique with an identifier that never changes in its lifetime, you should use something else. –  Joao Jul 3 '13 at 3:28
    
@Joao, you are confusing the client/consumer side of the contract with the producer/implementer. I am talking about the responsibility of the implementer, who overrides GetHashCode(). You are talking about the consumer, the one who is using the value. –  ILoveFortran Jul 8 '13 at 15:39

Hash code is used for hash-based collections like Dictionary, Hashtable, HashSet etc. The purpose of this code is to very quickly pre-sort specific object by putting it into specific group (bucket). This pre-sorting helps tremendously in finding this object when you need to retrieve it back from hash-collection because code has to search for your object in just one bucket instead of in all objects it contains. The better distribution of hash codes (better uniqueness) the faster retrieval. In ideal situation where each object has a unique hash code, finding it is an O(1) operation. In most cases it approaches O(1).

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Below using reflection seems to me a better option considering public properties as with this you don't have have to worry about addition / removal of properties (although not so common scenario). This I found to be performing better also.(Compared time using Diagonistics stop watch).

    public int getHashCode()
    {
        PropertyInfo[] theProperties = this.GetType().GetProperties();
        int hash = 31;
        foreach (PropertyInfo info in theProperties)
        {
            if (info != null)
            {
                var value = info.GetValue(this,null);
                if(value != null)
                unchecked
                {
                    hash = 29 * hash ^ value.GetHashCode();
                }
            }
        }
        return hash;  
    }
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It's my understanding that the original GetHashCode() returns the memory address of the object, so it's essential to override it if you wish to compare two different objects.

EDITED: That was incorrect, the original GetHashCode() method cannot assure the equality of 2 values. Though objects that are equal return the same hash code.

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That is incorrect. Read the MSDN explanation: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.object.gethashcode.aspx –  Bill W Dec 2 '13 at 19:26
    
Thanks for the link, just edited the post. –  user2855602 Dec 9 '13 at 19:36

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