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The question is pretty self-explanatory... I am looking for websites or documentation that will teach the basics of tcsh shell programming.

Thank you

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I've been trying to find Dennis Ritchie's article "Why C Shell isn't my favorite programming language", but I can't find it, so I probably have the title slightly wrong. –  Paul Tomblin Dec 16 '08 at 13:56
    
It looks like Ollivier found what I was looking for. Other than getting the author and the title wrong, I don't know why I had such trouble finding it. :-) –  Paul Tomblin Dec 16 '08 at 14:00
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"Csh Programming Considered Harmful" by Tom Christiansen, and "Why Pascal is Not My Favorite Programming Language" by Brian Kernighan (who could potentially be confused with Dennis Ritchie). Ritchie did write "Why I do not like X3J11 type qualifiers". –  Nietzche-jou Dec 16 '08 at 14:01
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Christiansen's article Csh Programmming Considered Harmful is well known, but there is also this: Top 10 reasons not to use the csh at: grymoire.com/Unix/CshTop10.txt which I think has better reasons than Christiansen's list of csh clunkiness. The script parsing method is a big problem for any script that has error checking in it. But for me, the big killer is that there are no user written functions in csh! (So much for csh being "like C".) This means that csh scripts are either huge monoliths, or a spaghetti of scripts sourcing scripts which source scripts.... –  mataap May 15 '09 at 2:23
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would suggest learning Csh first. You can start by reading Bill Joy's classic paper "An Introduction to the C shell". Then, move on to reading "Csh". After that, Google and practice are your best-friends.

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I'd respectfully advice to avoid csh scripting (being csh or tcsh). While it seems attracting especially because it is close to C syntax, *csh shells have known issues, many of them are here. Both quoting and [mis–]redirection are my main gripes and that's why I moved to sh scripting (staying as close as possible to POSIX sh) and for scripts with more than 20 lines (roughly), I move to a real language (Ruby in my case).

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+1. There is really no reason one should undertake scripting for any shell aside from POSIX sh (on *nix. Plan 9 and Windows et. al. are different stories.) –  Nietzche-jou Dec 16 '08 at 14:05
    
thanks for that link. it"s very helpful –  karlipoppins Dec 16 '08 at 14:15
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As Ollivier said, while it was great when it first came out and had many new bells and whistles, e.g. filename completion, history, etc. But learning csh, or tcsh, is a bit redundant nowadays.

I'd spend more effort learning POSIX sh as a start and then head towards bash or zsh. You need to use POSIX sh for portability, on some systems even going back to Bourne shell (sh) for portability.

HTH

cheers,

Rob

BTW Salut Ollivier...

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Hi Rob, long time no see :) –  Keltia Dec 16 '08 at 14:43
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I have this O'Reilly book on the subject and find it very helpful.

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I found Unix Power Tools (O'Reilly) to be an awesome resource to learn any of the popular shells (bash and tcsh are what I use). The best part about this book is that each section in each chapter is actually a 1 or 2-page article that can be read and used in under 15 minutes. Each article answers a particular FAQ, so just by keeping the book on your desk, and referring to in once in a while, you end up learning a lot.

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