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So given this XML...

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<root>
    <tree dah="false">
        <tree dah="false">
            <tree dah="false"/>
            <tree dah="false"/>
        </tree>
        <tree dah="false">
            <tree dah="true"/>
            <tree dah="false"/>
        </tree>
    </tree>
</root>

...I need an XPath that will evaluate to true since there is at least one tree/@dah='true'.

But that would evaluate to false if the XML looked like this...

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<root>
    <tree dah="false">
        <tree dah="false">
            <tree dah="false"/>
            <tree dah="false"/>
        </tree>
        <tree dah="false">
            <tree dah="false"/>
            <tree dah="false"/>
        </tree>
    </tree>
</root>

Also, the tree nodes may be any depth. I have three levels in my example, but it could go much deeper.

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Good question (+1). See my answer for two XPath expressions that return a boolean value exactly as specified in your question. –  Dimitre Novatchev Sep 15 '10 at 0:04

2 Answers 2

Use:

boolean(/root//tree[@dah='true'])

or

boolean((/root//tree[@dah='true'])[1])

Both expressions are equivalent, but the second would be more efficient with dumb (non-optimizing) XPath engines.

The result is true() if there exists a tree element in the XML document with a dah attribute with value 'true' -- otherwise the result is false().

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Why the "boolean()" function? –  dacracot Sep 15 '10 at 16:23
    
Also, is the [1] to tell it to stop at the first occurrence? –  dacracot Sep 15 '10 at 16:24
    
@dacracot [Why the boolean() fn.] Because you want true/false returned and this is exactly what the boolean() function does: w3.org/TR/1999/REC-xpath-19991116/#function-boolean –  Dimitre Novatchev Sep 15 '10 at 16:33
    
@dacracot [Also, is the [1] to tell it to stop at the first occurrence?] Yes, most XPath engines have at least this intelligence, not to evaluate the expression further. –  Dimitre Novatchev Sep 15 '10 at 16:34
    
/root//tree[@dah='true'] didn't work for me. /root//tree[@dah=true()] did the trick –  sidney Nov 6 '13 at 15:49
/root//tree[@dah='true']
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I don't want the node, but your solution works as /root//tree/@dah='true'. Thank you. –  dacracot Sep 14 '10 at 23:29
    
//tree/@dah="true" or /root//tree/@dah="true" should get you just true or false. –  Dunderklumpen Sep 14 '10 at 23:54
1  
@dacracot, MooGoo's answer will evaluate to true/false as you requested. If /root//tree[@dah = 'true'] selects an empty nodeset, that evaluates to false in a boolean context. A non-empty nodeset evaluates to true in a boolean context. –  LarsH Sep 15 '10 at 4:51
    
/root//tree[@dah='true'] didn't work for me. /root//tree[@dah=true()] did the trick –  sidney Nov 6 '13 at 15:48

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