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I'm not sure what the best word to use here. By "pyramidizing", I mean:

[1,2,3,4].pyramidize  # => [1,1,1,1,2,2,2,3,3,4]
["a","b","c","d"].pyramidize  # => ["a","a","a","a","b","b","b","c","c","d"]

To represent visually, it could be thought of as:

[ 1,1,1,1,
   2,2,2,
    3,3,
     4    ]

Is there a way to do this that maximizes elegance? A most ruby-like way?

I came across the "need" to do this in a project of mine. After thinking about it, I gave up and decided to work around the problem in an ugly way. I was wondering if there was a pretty way to do this. So far, to do it directly, I've ended up making a separate array for each index and stretching out each array the appropriate length and combining them together. But I don't know how to do this so it looks pretty; my solution is pretty ugly.

Added code golf tag because any solution in one line would probably make my day, but it doesn't have to be.

It doesn't really matter if your solution makes the first index the "base" of the pyramid, or the last index, because I could just reverse the array before running it.

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1  
Oneliner != code-golf. See the info on the code-golf tag stackoverflow.com/tags/code-golf/info –  gnibbler Sep 15 '10 at 5:16
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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Requires the new iterator fanciness in Ruby 1.9.

class Array
  def pyramidize
    reverse.map.with_index do |object, index|
      [object] * (index + 1)
    end.flatten.reverse
  end
end

[1,2,3,4].pyramidize
 => [1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4] 
["a","b","c","d"].pyramidize
 => ["a", "a", "a", "a", "b", "b", "b", "c", "c", "d"] 
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I didn't realize that was a 1.9 feature... :( I've been relying on Enumerable methods returning Enumerator objects in all of my recent code. –  guns Sep 15 '10 at 1:46
    
Reversing is redundant: flat_map.with_index{|o,i|[o]*(size-i)} –  Lars Haugseth Sep 15 '10 at 8:12
    
@Lars Totally true, and if I were optimizing for performance I'd certainly do that, but the mental model is clearer to me this way. –  PreciousBodilyFluids Sep 15 '10 at 8:47
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irb(main):001:0> [2,1,3,5].flat_map.with_index{|i,j|[i]*(j+1)}
=> [2, 1, 1, 3, 3, 3, 5, 5, 5, 5]
irb(main):002:0> [1,2,3,4].flat_map{|i|[i]*i}
=> [1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4]
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What version of ruby should I be running so I can use #flat_map? –  Justin L. Sep 15 '10 at 1:25
    
1.9.2 or use map{...}.flatten instead –  Nakilon Sep 15 '10 at 1:50
    
...or require "backports" –  Marc-André Lafortune Sep 15 '10 at 3:45
    
Your solution has the element counts inverted (four times 4 instead of four times 1, etc.) –  Lars Haugseth Sep 15 '10 at 8:06
    
Lars Haugseth, author mentioned, that use reverse is not a problem. –  Nakilon Sep 15 '10 at 12:51
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I'm not sure if you want to use the value of the list or the index to determine how much the list should repeat, but a simple solution in python that can probably transfer to ruby easily:

>>> import operator
>>> input = range(6)
>>> reduce(operator.add, [[i]*idx for idx, i in enumerate(input)])
[1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5]

Update

Oh and to invert the counts:

>>> import operator
>>> input = range(1, 6)
>>> reduce(operator.add, [[i]*(max(input) - idx) for idx, i in enumerate(input)])
[1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 5]

And of course you reversed the list in one of your examples:

>>> import operator
>>> input = range(1, 6)
>>> reduce(operator.add, [[i]*(max(input) - idx) for idx, i in enumerate(input)])[::-1]
[     5,
     4, 4, 
   3, 3, 3,
  2, 2, 2, 2,
 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]
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I'm sorry, I was unclear. The value of the index does not determine the number of repeats, but the index itself. –  Justin L. Sep 15 '10 at 1:19
    
fixed by using enumerate() :) –  Mike Axiak Sep 15 '10 at 1:48
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FWIW, this is a mathy way of doing it:

>>> A = [1, 2, 3, 4]
>>> [ A[int((sqrt(8*k+1)-1) / 2)] for k in range(len(A)*(len(A)+1) / 2) ]
[1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4]

Admittedly, the use of sqrt is pretty ugly.

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Thanks for the math formula though; it'll come in handy –  Justin L. Sep 15 '10 at 6:10
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Haskell:

pyramidize x = zipWith replicate [length x..1] x

Shortend:

p x=zipWith replicate [length x..1] x

(37 chars)

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Here is another way to do it in Python

>>> A=[1,2,3,4]
>>> [y for i,x in enumerate(A) for y in [x]*(len(A)-i)]
[1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4]

But it's nicer not to create all those temporary lists

>>> from itertools import repeat
>>> [y for i,x in enumerate(A) for y in repeat(x, len(A)-i)]
[1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4]
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