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I have a div inside of another div. #outer and #inner. #outer has curved borders and a white background. #inner has no curved borders and a green background. #inner extends beyond the curved borders of #outer. Is there anyway to stop this?

<div id="outer">
    <div id="inner"></div>
    <!-- other stuff needs a white background -->
    <!-- bottom corners needs a white background -->
</div>

With the css:

#outer { 
    display: block; float: right; margin: 0; width: 200px;
    background-color: white; overflow: hidden;
    -moz-border-radius: 10px; 
    -khtml-border-radius: 10px; 
    -webkit-border-radius: 10px; 
    border-radius: 10px; 
}
#inner { background-color: #209400; height: 10px; border-top: none; }

No matter how I try it still overlaps. How can I make #inner obey and fill to #outer's borders?

edit

The following hack served the purpose for now. But the question stands (maybe to the CSS3 and webbrowser writers): Why don't child elements obey their parent's curved borders and is there anyway to force them to?

The hack to get around this for my needs for now, you can assign curves to individual borders. So for my purposes, I just assigned a curve to the top two of the inner element.

#inner {
    border-top-right-radius: 10px; -moz-border-radius-topright: 10px; -webkit-border-top-right-radius: 10px;
    border-top-left-radius: 10px; -moz-border-radius-topleft: 10px; -webkit-border-top-left-radius: 10px;
}
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Have you tried to set exactly the same border radius to the internal element? –  Daniel Sep 15 '10 at 6:20
    
But I want the border radius of the internal element to be straight on the bottom. Is it possible to set a border radius just for a certain corner? –  Daniel Bingham Sep 15 '10 at 7:03
    
For sure. You can even assign them like border-radius: TL TR BL BR. –  Daniel Sep 15 '10 at 7:17
9  
I read this as "Forcing child to obey parent's orders". :) –  Bennor McCarthy Sep 16 '10 at 5:40
    
With the exception of Safari, -moz-border-radius and border-radius can be used as a shorthand with four values: 10px 10px 0 0. For Safari however you need to set them individually. –  Yi Jiang Sep 16 '10 at 5:45
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4 Answers 4

up vote 26 down vote accepted

According to the specs:

A box's backgrounds, but not its border-image, are clipped to the appropriate curve (as determined by ‘background-clip’). Other effects that clip to the border or padding edge (such as ‘overflow’ other than ‘visible’) also must clip to the curve. The content of replaced elements is always trimmed to the content edge curve. Also, the area outside the curve of the border edge does not accept mouse events on behalf of the element.

http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-background/#the-border-radius

This means that an overflow: hidden on #outer should work. However, this won't work for Firefox 3.6 and below. This is fixed in Firefox 4:

Rounded corners now clip content and images (if overflow: visible is not set).

https://developer.mozilla.org/en/CSS/-moz-border-radius

So you'll still need the fix, just shorten it to:

#outer {
  overflow: hidden;
}

#inner {
  -moz-border-radius: 10px 10px 0 0;
}

See it working here: http://jsfiddle.net/VaTAZ/3/

share|improve this answer
    
Bingo, I was testing with Firefox 3.6. So this explains it. –  Daniel Bingham Sep 18 '10 at 1:17
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What would be wrong with this?

#outer { 
    display: block; float: right; margin: 0; width: 200px;
    background-color: white; overflow: hidden;
}
#inner { background-color: #209400; height: 10px; border-top: none; }

#outer, #inner{
    -moz-border-radius: 10px; 
    -khtml-border-radius: 10px; 
    -webkit-border-radius: 10px; 
    border-radius: 10px; 
}
share|improve this answer
    
I want the bottom to be sharp cornered. This would take two inner divs, one given a negative margin to overlap the other. –  Daniel Bingham Sep 15 '10 at 7:02
    
Hmm... turns out you can set individual corners. So I just set the top two. –  Daniel Bingham Sep 15 '10 at 7:08
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If you want sharp edges on the bottom: Use these :

border-top-left-radius: 10px;
border-top-right-radius: 10px; 

-moz-border-radius-topleft
-moz-border-radius-topright
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have you tried making the position:relative for the inner div ???

that is:

#inner { 
    background-color: #209400; 
    height: 10px; 
    border-top: none; 
    position: relative; 
    left: 15px; 
    top: 15px; 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Tried, didn't work in firefox. Good idea though. –  Daniel Bingham Sep 15 '10 at 7:08
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