Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking for general a strategy/advice on how to handle invalid UTF-8 input from users.

Even though my webapp uses UTF-8, somehow some users enter invalid characters. This causes errors in PHP's json_encode() and overall seems like a bad idea to have around.

W3C I18N FAQ: Multilingual Forms says "If non-UTF-8 data is received, an error message should be sent back.".

  • How exactly should this be practically done, throughout a site with dozens of different places where data can be input?
  • How do you present the error in a helpful way to the user?
  • How do you temporarily store and display bad form data so the user doesn't lose all their text? Strip bad characters? Use a replacement character, and how?
  • For existing data in the database, when invalid UTF-8 data is detected, should I try to convert it and save it back (how? utf8_encode()? mb_convert_encoding()?), or leave as-is in the database but doing something (what?) before json_encode()?

EDIT: I'm very familiar with the mbstring extension and am not asking "how does UTF-8 work in PHP". I'd like advice from people with experience in real-world situations how they've handled this.

EDIT2: As part of the solution, I'd really like to see a fast method to convert invalid characters to U+FFFD

share|improve this question
    
It doesn't follow the guidelines you linked, but I just replace invalid byte sequences with U+FFFD so I can be done with it. –  zildjohn01 Sep 15 '10 at 15:13
    
@zildjohn01, What's the best way to do this (which PHP functions?). Could you leave a detailed answer with your approach? –  philfreo Sep 18 '10 at 18:39
    
To be honest, it's not very exciting. I just translated a UTF-8 parser from C to PHP. It scans the string byte by byte, and if an invalid byte sequence is found, it rewrites the string manually. Slow, but portable. –  zildjohn01 Sep 18 '10 at 21:03
    
Still would be interested in seeing it if you care to share –  philfreo Sep 19 '10 at 4:34
    
I'd really like to see a fast method for translating invalid characters to U+FFFD. :) –  philfreo Sep 21 '10 at 18:38

8 Answers 8

up vote 40 down vote accepted
+25

The accept-charset="UTF-8" attribute is only a guideline for browsers to follow, they are not forced to submit that in that way, crappy form submission bots are a good example...

What I usually do is ignore bad chars, either via iconv() or with the less reliable utf8_encode() / utf8_decode() functions, if you use iconv you also have the option to transliterate bad chars.

Here is an example using iconv():

$str_ignore = iconv('UTF-8', 'UTF-8//IGNORE', $str);
$str_translit = iconv('UTF-8', 'UTF-8//TRANSLIT', $str);

If you want to display an error message to your users I'd probably do this in a global way instead of a per value received basis, something like this would probably do just fine:

function utf8_clean($str)
{
    return iconv('UTF-8', 'UTF-8//IGNORE', $str);
}

$clean_GET = array_map('utf8_clean', $_GET);

if (serialize($_GET) != serialize($clean_GET))
{
    $_GET = $clean_GET;
    $error_msg = 'Your data is not valid UTF-8 and has been stripped.';
}

// $_GET is clean!

You may also want to normalize new lines and strip (non-)visible control chars, like this:

function Clean($string, $control = true)
{
    $string = iconv('UTF-8', 'UTF-8//IGNORE', $string);

    if ($control === true)
    {
            return preg_replace('~\p{C}+~u', '', $string);
    }

    return preg_replace(array('~\r\n?~', '~[^\P{C}\t\n]+~u'), array("\n", ''), $string);
}

Code to convert from UTF-8 to Unicode codepoints:

function Codepoint($char)
{
    $result = null;
    $codepoint = unpack('N', iconv('UTF-8', 'UCS-4BE', $char));

    if (is_array($codepoint) && array_key_exists(1, $codepoint))
    {
        $result = sprintf('U+%04X', $codepoint[1]);
    }

    return $result;
}

echo Codepoint('à'); // U+00E0
echo Codepoint('ひ'); // U+3072

Probably faster than any other alternative, haven't tested it extensively though.


Example:

$string = 'hello world�';

// U+FFFEhello worldU+FFFD
echo preg_replace_callback('/[\p{So}\p{Cf}\p{Co}\p{Cs}\p{Cn}]/u', 'Bad_Codepoint', $string);

function Bad_Codepoint($string)
{
    $result = array();

    foreach ((array) $string as $char)
    {
        $codepoint = unpack('N', iconv('UTF-8', 'UCS-4BE', $char));

        if (is_array($codepoint) && array_key_exists(1, $codepoint))
        {
            $result[] = sprintf('U+%04X', $codepoint[1]);
        }
    }

    return implode('', $result);
}

Is this what you were looking for?

share|improve this answer
1  
Would this method allow you to replace invalid characters with U+FFFD rather than just stripping? It seems like that'd be more helpful so the user sees exactly which chars had a problem. –  philfreo Sep 20 '10 at 15:53
2  
@philfreo: Ok, this one is a must read: webcollab.sourceforge.net/unicode.html. –  Alix Axel Sep 20 '10 at 23:16
1  
@philfreo: Just posted some code to output Unicode code points, I suppose you know where to fit that in the whole picture. Regarding your utf8_encode question, the manual page says it all: "encodes an ISO-8859-1 string to UTF-8", it throws garbage all the time. iconv on the other hand is a mature C library not PHP specific, hence more reliable. –  Alix Axel Sep 25 '10 at 1:06
1  
so when invalid data is found, rather than just stripping it (//IGNORE), the user sees which character was invalid. –  philfreo Sep 25 '10 at 2:55
1  
@Yzmir: Would you care to expand on that statement? If you could share some example bogus strings that would be awesome, since it always seems to work in the tests I've made. –  Alix Axel May 21 '11 at 1:44

Receiving invalid characters from your web app might have to do with the character sets assumed for HTML forms. You can specify which character set to use for forms with the accept-charset attribute:

<form action="..." accept-charset="UTF-8">

You also might want to take a look at similar questions in StackOverflow for pointers on how to handle invalid characters, e.g. those in the column to the right, but I think that signaling an error to the user is better than trying to clean up those invalid characters which cause unexpected loss of significant data or unexpected change of your user's inputs.

share|improve this answer
    
It specifies the character sets accepted by the server. I'm not sure whether it is enough to only specify UTF-8 encoding for the page - the browser could display UTF-8 while sending form data in ISO-8859-1 or something else. –  Archimedix Sep 15 '10 at 15:11
    
What does accept-charset really do -- is it impossible for a user to submit invalid characters, or only a suggestion? How should I handle bad data if I still receive it server-side? –  philfreo Sep 15 '10 at 15:17
    
According to stackoverflow.com/questions/3719974/… this would be unnecessary –  philfreo Sep 15 '10 at 19:41
    
I do not use this attribute myself either and have no problems with UTF-8 characters I tested so far. Referring to Pekka's comment to that question, however, the W3C specification really says that The default value for this attribute is the reserved string "UNKNOWN". User agents may interpret this value as the character encoding that was used to transmit the document, so I'm not really sure how browsers handle that. stackoverflow.com/questions/3719974/#comment-3926382 –  Archimedix Sep 15 '10 at 20:15
    
When you encounter bad data, my opinion is that you should notify the user about that and give her the opportunity to revise her input. This way, you avoid confusion and the user could work around this issue. However, it would be interesting to identify the circumstances leading to you receiving invalid data in the first place - is this caused by specific browsers, what headers are sent by client and server, what encoding is set in the browser after the page with the form is loaded etc. –  Archimedix Sep 15 '10 at 20:25

I put together a fairly simple class to check if input is in UTF-8 and to run through utf8_encode() as needs be:

class utf8
{

    /**
     * @param array $data
     * @param int $options
     * @return array
     */
    public static function encode(array $data)
    {
        foreach ($data as $key=>$val) {
            if (is_array($val)) {
                $data[$key] = self::encode($val, $options);
            } else {
                if (false === self::check($val)) {
                    $data[$key] = utf8_encode($val);
                }
            }
        }

        return $data;
    }

    /**
     * Regular expression to test a string is UTF8 encoded
     * 
     * RFC3629
     * 
     * @param string $string The string to be tested
     * @return bool
     * 
     * @link http://www.w3.org/International/questions/qa-forms-utf-8.en.php
     */
    public static function check($string)
    {
        return preg_match('%^(?:
            [\x09\x0A\x0D\x20-\x7E]              # ASCII
            | [\xC2-\xDF][\x80-\xBF]             # non-overlong 2-byte
            |  \xE0[\xA0-\xBF][\x80-\xBF]        # excluding overlongs
            | [\xE1-\xEC\xEE\xEF][\x80-\xBF]{2}  # straight 3-byte
            |  \xED[\x80-\x9F][\x80-\xBF]        # excluding surrogates
            |  \xF0[\x90-\xBF][\x80-\xBF]{2}     # planes 1-3
            | [\xF1-\xF3][\x80-\xBF]{3}          # planes 4-15
            |  \xF4[\x80-\x8F][\x80-\xBF]{2}     # plane 16
            )*$%xs',
            $string);
    }
}

// For example
$data = utf8::encode($_POST);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for w3 regex. –  rjha94 Aug 15 '12 at 14:53

There is a multibyte extension for PHP, check it out: http://www.php.net/manual/en/book.mbstring.php

You should try mb_check_encoding() function.

Good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
I'm very familiar with the mb extension, as I linked to it in my own question. Comments on this page indicate that this mb_check_encoding() does not really check for bad byte sequences, plus I'm really asking about a general strategy, not how to do one specific part. –  philfreo Sep 15 '10 at 14:49
    
What comment is that? Nobody mentions that function that I can see. The purpose of the function is exactly to check for bad byte sequences. There is one open bug for the function, but a comment on that page says it should be closed. –  itpastorn Jul 11 '13 at 14:54

For completeness to this question (not necessarily the best answer)...

function as_utf8($s) {
    return mb_convert_encoding($s, "UTF-8", mb_detect_encoding($s));
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This is good, but be careful; mb_detect_encoding() isn't always 100% accurate if you don't specify which encodings it should check for. Also, some encodings behave almost identically (e.g., ISO-8859-1/Latin-1 and CP-1252/Windows-1252 — in fact, any single-byte encoding such as KOI8-R, any flavor of ISO-8859-*, etc. is practically impossible to detect unless you employ some very clever [and likely computationally expensive] heuristics). –  todofixthis Feb 16 '12 at 16:25

How about stripping all chars outside your given subset. At least in some parts of my application I would not allow using chars outside the [a-Z] [0-9 sets], for example usernames. You can build a filter function that strips silently all chars outside this range, or that returns an error if it detects them and pushes the decision to the user.

share|improve this answer
    
"just ignoring malformed sequences or unavailable characters does not conform to ISO 10646, will make debugging more difficult, and can lead to user confusion." cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/ucs/examples/UTF-8-test.txt –  philfreo Sep 15 '10 at 14:52
    
@philifreo : is what you've linked your homework or just a reference? If it's just a reference, that's because the prof is assigning a homework assignment to students and he is challenging them -- not because there is philosophical relevance to detecting bad encoding. You know the expression "the show must go on"? That applies to programming too and that is why my answer gives you the ability to either strip bad characters or return an error if they are detected. –  Geekster Sep 22 '10 at 13:50

Try doing what Rails does to force all browsers always to post UTF-8 data:

<form accept-charset="UTF-8" action="#{action}" method="post"><div
    style="margin:0;padding:0;display:inline">
    <input name="utf8" type="hidden" value="&#x2713;" />
  </div>
  <!-- form fields -->
</form>

See railssnowman.info or the initial patch for an explanation.

  1. To have the browser sends form-submission data in the UTF-8 encoding, just render the page with a Content-Type header of "text/html; charset=utf-8" (or use a meta http-equiv tag).
  2. To have the browser sends form-submission data in the UTF-8 encoding, even if the user fiddles with the page encoding (browsers let users do that), use accept-charset="UTF-8" in the form.
  3. To have the browser sends form-submission data in the UTF-8 encoding, even if the user fiddles with the page encoding (browsers let users do that), and even if the browser is IE and the user switched the page encoding to Korean and entered Korean characters in the form fields, add a hidden input to the form with a value such as &#x2713; which can only be from the Unicode charset (and, in this example, not the Korean charset).
share|improve this answer
1  
Does accept-charset really force browsers to not send any non-UTF8 data? What happens if they try to? How should I handle it on the server if this client-side validation is bypassed? –  philfreo Sep 15 '10 at 15:11
    
Can you explain the hidden field as well - is that necessary? –  philfreo Sep 15 '10 at 15:13
    
According to stackoverflow.com/questions/3719974/… this would all be unnecessary –  philfreo Sep 15 '10 at 19:42
    
I'm not sure you read that other page correctly.... I edited my answer to include the explanation of what Rails does. –  yfeldblum Sep 15 '10 at 22:33
    
This won't help protect against XSS attacks because it's client side. I believe the idea here is to purify the data coming into the system, but you can't rely on HTML flags for that. –  Geekster Sep 20 '10 at 13:52

I recommend merely not allowing garbage to get in. Don't rely on custom functions, which can bog your system down. Simply walk the submitted data against an alphabet you design. Create an acceptable alphabet string and walk the submitted data, byte by byte, as if it were an array. Push acceptable characters to a new string, and omit unacceptable characters. The data you store in your database then is data triggered by the user, but not actually user-supplied data.

EDIT #4: Replacing bad character with entiy: �

EDIT #3: Updated : Sept 22 2010 @ 1:32pm Reason: Now string returned is UTF-8, plus I used the test file you provided as proof.

<?php
// build alphabet
// optionally you can remove characters from this array

$alpha[]= chr(0); // null
$alpha[]= chr(9); // tab
$alpha[]= chr(10); // new line
$alpha[]= chr(11); // tab
$alpha[]= chr(13); // carriage return

for ($i = 32; $i <= 126; $i++) {
$alpha[]= chr($i);
}

/* remove comment to check ascii ordinals */

// /*
// foreach ($alpha as $key=>$val){
//  print ord($val);
//  print '<br/>';
// }
// print '<hr/>';
//*/
// 
// //test case #1
// 
// $str = 'afsjdfhasjhdgljhasdlfy42we875y342q8957y2wkjrgSAHKDJgfcv kzXnxbnSXbcv   '.chr(160).chr(127).chr(126);
// 
// $string = teststr($alpha,$str);
// print $string;
// print '<hr/>';
// 
// //test case #2
// 
// $str = ''.'©?™???';
// $string = teststr($alpha,$str);
// print $string;
// print '<hr/>';
// 
// $str = '©';
// $string = teststr($alpha,$str);
// print $string;
// print '<hr/>';

$file = 'http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/ucs/examples/UTF-8-test.txt';
$testfile = implode(chr(10),file($file));

$string = teststr($alpha,$testfile);
print $string;
print '<hr/>';


function teststr(&$alpha, &$str){
    $strlen = strlen($str);
    $newstr = chr(0); //null
    $x = 0;
    if($strlen >= 2){

        for ($i = 0; $i < $strlen; $i++) {
            $x++;
            if(in_array($str[$i],$alpha)){
                // passed
                $newstr .= $str[$i];
            }else{
                // failed
                print 'Found out of scope character. (ASCII: '.ord($str[$i]).')';
                print '<br/>';
                $newstr .= '&#65533;';
            }
        }
    }elseif($strlen <= 0){
        // failed to qualify for test
        print 'Non-existent.';

    }elseif($strlen === 1){
        $x++;
        if(in_array($str,$alpha)){
            // passed

            $newstr = $str;
        }else{
            // failed
            print 'Total character failed to qualify.';
            $newstr = '&#65533;';
        }
    }else{
        print 'Non-existent (scope).';
        }

if(mb_detect_encoding($newstr, "UTF-8") == "UTF-8"){
// skip
}else{
    $newstr = utf8_encode($newstr);
}


// test encoding:
if(mb_detect_encoding($newstr, "UTF-8")=="UTF-8"){
    print 'UTF-8 :D<br/>';
    }else{
        print 'ENCODED: '.mb_detect_encoding($newstr, "UTF-8").'<br/>';
        }




return $newstr.' (scope: '.$x.', '.$strlen.')';
}
share|improve this answer
    
How do you propose doing that, when the "alphabet" is any valid UTF-8 character. –  philfreo Sep 20 '10 at 14:32
    
Okay EDIT #1 is updated and should purify anything you want to put into JSON. Of course you can adjust the characters in your alphabet if JSON still chokes. If you could post a sample data file that is choking on JSON that'd help me fine-tune this. –  Geekster Sep 21 '10 at 17:10
    
That doesn't look like it supports UTF-8 to me... –  philfreo Sep 22 '10 at 15:37
    
It is now UTF-8 returned, proof. –  Geekster Sep 22 '10 at 17:27
    
I have updated it to use the file you provided. Your server will need to have fopen wrappers enabled because I'm reading the URL into file(). Of course if you want you can download the file and read it in from your directory but I'm LAZY. :D –  Geekster Sep 22 '10 at 17:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.