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When I find scripts for php or look at php frameworks I see a "registry class" or a "container class" which often holds variables or other objects utilizing the __get magic method.

Here is a oversimplified example of what I mean:

example 1:

class container {
 private $objects;
 public function __get($class){
  if(isset($this->objects[$class])){
   return $this->objects[$class];
  }
  return $this->objects[$class] = new $class();
 }
}

the above example will have more functions to it when creating the class instead of just calling it but for my example it should be enough. "example 1" is how I mostly see it in scripts downloaded from the internet, it maintains a single class instance, now what I'm wondering is that wouldn't this example do the same thing and be more efficient:

example 2:

class simplecontainer {
 public function __get($class){
  return $this->$class = new $class();
 }
}

But I never see "example 2" in other peoples scripts which makes me think twice before even considering to use it.

I tested container vs simplecontainer using several classes that they would contain and re-use around 100000 times and "example 1" does it in 0.75seconds on my local machine, and "example 2" does it in 0.29seconds.

which should I use in my scripts? example 1 or example 2? and why?

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1  
Looks like simplecontainer holds one object only at a time. –  fabrik Sep 15 '10 at 7:31
1  
I tested it with 3 different objects, and it holds all 3, or did I misunderstand what you meant? –  Timo Huovinen Sep 15 '10 at 7:35
    
Maybe i'm overlooking sg but how do you refer these different objects? –  fabrik Sep 15 '10 at 7:36
1  
$container = new simplecontainer(); $container->testclass->test(); –  Timo Huovinen Sep 15 '10 at 7:43
    
@Yuri: what you wrote it doesn't makes any sense. This is what i call complicated and also useless. –  fabrik Sep 15 '10 at 7:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Because in yours I can't do this:

class container {
    private $foo = "I'm only a var";
    private $objects;
    public function __get($class){
        if(isset($this->objects[$class])){
            return $this->objects[$class];
        }
        return $this->objects[$class] = new $class();
    }
}

class simplecontainer {
    private $foo = "I'm only a var";
    public function __get($class){
        return $this->$class = new $class();
    }
}

class foo {
    public $bar = "wibble";
}

$c1 = new container();
$c2 = new simplecontainer();

$foo = $c1->foo;
$foo->bar = "Don't you forget about me!";
unset($foo);
$foo = $c1->foo;
echo $foo->bar;

$foo = $c2->foo;
$foo->bar = "Don't you forget about me!";
unset($foo);   
$foo = $c2->foo;
echo $foo->bar;
// Doh!

Your version relies on no class name being the same as a private member of the container object. Ok, so it should be simple to avoid, but would be a pain tracking down a bug for. Safe coding means less stress.

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1  
im still thinking this through, but hmmm, I like less stress :D –  Timo Huovinen Sep 15 '10 at 8:18
    
It actually throws up some weird behaviour from PHP (no surprise). The simplecontainer in my example returns one foo object to the caller and then sets an entirely different one as the private method in the container. Seeing as how objects are meant to get passed by reference it's a bit wacky. –  Mike Sep 15 '10 at 8:22
    
the unset() in your example seems like it does nothing? well, nothing to change the outcome at least. –  Timo Huovinen Sep 15 '10 at 8:27
    
yes, this is of great insight into the quirkyness of php xD, took me a while to understand the differences but is invaluable for me at least. Thank you for helping me fix my confusion!! –  Timo Huovinen Sep 15 '10 at 8:33
    
Had something in my head about clearing references when I wrote it. As you say, they're totally unnecessary. –  Mike Sep 15 '10 at 8:36

Without first off example2 doesnt define the objects as protected or private which means that simplecontainer::objects will be a public member that can be overwritten like:

$container->className = new SomethingElse();

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1  
Wait, I thought that after creating the instance and storing it in a variable by doing this $this->$class = new $class(); it gets stored and it will no longer call __get on any subsequent calls? I will test this right away. –  Timo Huovinen Sep 15 '10 at 7:44
1  
yes, im correct, it only gets called when creating the object and it stores it for the future ones, so your second point is wrong. –  Timo Huovinen Sep 15 '10 at 7:47
    
Yeah youre right... i overlooked the fact that it wasnt storing them in an objects member... ill edit. good catch. –  prodigitalson Sep 15 '10 at 7:52
    
@Yuri: you don't understand yet. –  fabrik Sep 15 '10 at 7:58
    
so the reason they use example 1 is just for a safeguard against people rewriting the object? –  Timo Huovinen Sep 15 '10 at 8:03

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