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I have the following code:

if ($_POST['submit'] == "Next") {
    foreach($_POST['info'] as $key => $value) {
    	echo $value;
    }
}

How do I get the foreach function to start from the 2nd key in the array? Thanx.

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11 Answers 11

up vote 52 down vote accepted

For reasonably small arrays, use array_slice to create a second one:

foreach(array_slice($_POST['info'],1) as $key=>$value)
{
    echo $value;
}
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This will skip the first 2 keys, but fix that small mistake and it's a good method –  Greg Dec 16 '08 at 15:00
1  
Damn off-by-one errors :-) –  Michael Stum Dec 16 '08 at 15:03
foreach(array_slice($_POST['info'], 1) as $key=>$value) {
    echo $value;
}

Alternatively if you don't want to copy the array you could just do:

$isFirst = true;
foreach($_POST['info'] as $key=>$value) {
    if ($isFirst) {
        $isFirst = false;
        continue;
    }   
    echo $value;
}
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I think you left an array_slice in the second block by accident –  Greg Dec 16 '08 at 14:58
    
yeah, removed. thanks –  Tom Haigh Dec 16 '08 at 14:59
    
I like the isFirst solution better. Its in your face logic, the array slice version could easily be missed when scanning unfamiliar code. –  James Anderson Dec 16 '08 at 15:20
    
The isFirst solution is also scales better with array size. –  Ben Blank Dec 17 '08 at 22:35

If you were working with a normal array, I'd say to use something like

foreach (array_slice($ome_array, 1) as $k => $v {...

but, since you're looking at a user request, you don't have any real guarantees on the order in which the arguments might be returned - some browser/proxy might change its behavior or you might simply decide to modify your form in the future. Either way, it's in your best interest to ignore the ordering of the array and treat POST values as an unordered hash map, leaving you with two options :

  • copy the array and unset the key you want to ignore
  • loop through the whole array and continue when seeing the key you wish to ignore
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This is the only answer I've seen so far that even approaches being correct: there is no such thing as "the 2nd key in the array", an associative array is unordered by nature. –  George Jempty Dec 18 '08 at 0:54
    
From php.net/types.array : "An array in PHP is actually an ordered map". They act sorta strangely. –  Sean McSomething Dec 18 '08 at 1:43

Couldn't you just unset the array...

So if I had an array where I didn't want the first instance, I could just:

unset($array[0]);

and that would remove the instance from the array.

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in loop:

if ($key == 0) //or whatever
   continue;
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I tend to advise against testing for 'special cases' in a loop, if they are known upfront (i.e. the first entry) -> -1 –  xtofl Dec 16 '08 at 14:58
    
@xtol: Why, if I may ask? –  nico May 21 '10 at 18:49

If you're willing to throw the first element away, you can use array_shift(). However, this is slow on a huge array. A faster operation would be

reset($a);
unset(key($a));
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Really? How huge would array_shift() become slow for? And why would unset be faster? –  bobobobo May 20 '10 at 3:57
    
Ya know, I can't remember why I answered this. Haven't needed this trick in a long time, but I probably got a speedup onceuponatime by doing it the other way! I would imagine an array of some tens of Mb in size might have a difference. –  staticsan May 21 '10 at 0:14
3  
ACTUALLY!! array_shift() is POISON!! It actually re-numbers all numerical array indices -- even if they are initially sparse (e.g. an array defined array(1=>'a', 3=>'b', 99=>'c') would become equivalent to array('0'=>'b', '1'=c) after an array_shift() operation. Don't array_shift() unless this is what you want!! –  bobobobo May 21 '10 at 18:39
    
And so yes, hence why this is faster. The re-indexing operation takes a lot of time. –  bobobobo May 21 '10 at 18:47
    
Well done for doing the research yourself. Just a note that sometimes the keys don't matter. –  staticsan May 24 '10 at 0:23

On a array filled with 1000 elements the difference is quite minimal.

Test:

<?php
function slice($a)
{
    foreach(array_slice($a, 1) as $key)
    {

    }

    return true;
}

function skip($a)
{
    $first = false;

    foreach($a as $key)
    {
    	if($first)
    	{
    		$first = false;
    		continue;
    	}
    }

    return true;
}

$array = array_fill(0, 1000, 'test');

$t1 = time() + microtime(true);

for ($i = 0; $i < 1000; $i++)
{
    slice($array);
}

var_dump((time() + microtime(true)) - $t1);

echo '<hr />';

$t2 = time() + microtime(true);

for ($i = 0; $i < 1000; $i++)
{
    skip($array);
}

var_dump((time() + microtime(true)) - $t2);
?>

Output:

float(0.23605012893677)

float(0.24102783203125)

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2  
I think it is memory usage that is the more important difference here - maybe measure with memory_get_usage() –  Tom Haigh Dec 19 '08 at 12:22

Alternative way is to use array pointers:

reset($_POST['info']); //set pointer to zero
while ($value=next($_POST['info'])  //ponter+1, return value
{
  echo key($_POST['info']).":".$value."\n";
}
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foreach($_POST['info'] as $key=>$value) {
    if ($key == 0) { //or what ever the first key you're using is
        continue;
    }  else { 
        echo $value;
    }
}

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if in loop not good, if you can avoid it –  bobobobo May 20 '10 at 3:53

if you structure your form differently

  <input type='text' name='quiz[first]' value=""/>
  <input type='text' name='quiz[second]' value=""/>

...then in your PHP

if( isset($_POST['quiz']) AND 
    is_array($_POST['quiz'])) {

    //...and we'll skip $_POST['quiz']['first'] 
    foreach($_POST['quiz'] as $key => $val){
      if($key == "first") continue;
      print $val; 
    }
}

...you can now just loop over that particular structure and access rest normally

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How about you use integers instead of strings? (Even though technically it's sent over as a string, it's easier to debug (and generate!) with integers.) –  strager Dec 18 '08 at 0:52
    
Your if in the loop not good –  bobobobo May 20 '10 at 3:55

How about something like this? Read off the first key and value using key() and current(), then array_shift() to dequeue the front element from the array (EDIT: Don't use array_shift(), it renumbers any numerical indices in the array, which you don't always want!).

    <?php

    $arr = array(

      'one' => "ONE!!",
      'two' => "TWO!!",
      'three' => "TREE",
      4 => "Fourth element",
      99 => "We skipped a few here.."

    ) ;

    $firstKey = key( $arr ) ;
    $firstVal = current( $arr ) ;

    echo( "

OK, first values are $firstKey, $firstVal

" ) ; ####array_shift( $arr ) ; #'dequeue' front element # BAD! renumbers! unset( $arr[ $firstKey ] ) ; # BETTER! echo( "

Now for the rest of them

" ) ; foreach( $arr as $key=>$val ) { echo( "

$key => $val

" ) ; } ?>
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