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Just for neatness sake I was wondering, whether it's possible to cast Y or N to a bool? Something like this;

bool theanswer = Convert.ToBoolean(input);

The long version;

bool theanswer = false;
switch (input)
{
   case "y": theanswer = true; break;
   case "n": theanswer = false; break
}
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2  
Would you want the algorithm to bomb if the string is not "y" or "n"? –  Richard J. Ross III Sep 15 '10 at 10:52
    
I was considering trying to catch the exception yes. –  wonea Sep 15 '10 at 10:59
3  
There's no built in support for this. I presume this is due to y/n being localized information (yes/no) which depends on the current culture. –  Simon Svensson Sep 15 '10 at 11:43
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7 Answers

up vote 27 down vote accepted

No, there's nothing built in for this.

However, given that you want to default to false, you can just use:

bool theAnswer = (input == "y");

(The bracketing there is just for clarity.)

You may want to consider making it case-insensitive though, given the difference between the text of your question and the code you've got. One way of doing this:

bool theAnswer = "y".Equals(input, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase);

Note that using the specified string comparison avoids creating a new string, and means you don't need to worry about cultural issues... unless you want to perform a culture-sensitive comparison, of course. Also note that I've put the literal as the "target" of the method call to avoid NullReferenceException being thrown when input is null.

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6  
Nice guard against input being null in second example. Gotta remember that. –  Luc Sep 15 '10 at 10:57
    
Thanks for that, the explanation really helped. –  wonea Sep 15 '10 at 10:57
2  
(input ?? "").Equals("y", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase); makes the intent clear, we check value of variables equal to some constants not vice versa. Its the same c++ debate of if (NULL==ptr) –  Hasan Khan Sep 29 '10 at 7:34
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bool theanswer = input.ToLower() == "y";
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Using .ToLower is considered as bad practice when comparing strings. Better use the equals function. Your method might work, but equals is better. Also your code does not handle iput being null (causes a nullpointer on the ToLower when input is null). –  Gertjan Sep 15 '10 at 10:54
    
Brilliant stuff, thank you. I'd like todo more reading into how to form these type of expressions. –  wonea Sep 15 '10 at 10:54
1  
@Gertjan - Please provide a link for consideration on best practices rather than making a blanket statement. Depending on the needs of the application, I would think a NullReferenceException would be expected at the level a piece such as this would be executed. –  Joel Etherton Sep 15 '10 at 11:01
    
@Joel Etherton: Well I don't have a source by hand, but common logic tells you that using .ToLowers can cause nasty bugs if not applied to all variables in the correct way. FXCop warns when using .ToLower and suggests using ToUpperInvariant. I don't know the inner working sof the equals function, but .ToLower() comparison will create temporary strings for comparing. So possibly using .ToLower (or ToUpper) causes extra memory usage. Also the handling of null is done inside the function making your own code less messy. –  Gertjan Sep 16 '10 at 6:54
1  
@Joel Etherton - A NullReferenceException is always a bug in your code, so it should definitely not be expected. If null is invalid it should be flagged with an ArgumentNullException or a contract failure which is far easier to track down. Ever tried to track down the source of a NullReferenceException without line numbers? –  Greg Beech Sep 16 '10 at 16:28
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As suggested by Jon, ther's nothing inbuilt like this. The answer posted by John gives you a correct way of doing. Just for more clarification, you can visit:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/86hw82a3.aspxlink text

Hope, it helps

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Create a extension method for string that does something similar to what you specify in the second algorithm, thus cleaning up your code:

public static bool ToBool(this string input)
{
    // input will never be null, as you cannot call a method on a null object
    if (input.Equals("y", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
    {
         return true;
    }
    else if (input.Equals("n", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
    {
         return false;
    }
    else
    {
         throw new Exception("The data is not in the correct format.");
    }
}

and call the code:

if (aString.ToBool())
{
     // do something
}
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1  
Nice use of the extension method, but maybe it is better to make a parse on the boolean class (like the Int.Parse). –  Gertjan Sep 15 '10 at 10:56
    
You cannot make an extension of a class that you cannot have an instance of..in other words, you cannot have a extension to a static class. –  Richard J. Ross III Sep 15 '10 at 11:03
    
Any reason for using StartsWith rather than Equals? I thing "not very much" is probably just as invalid as "true" :) (I'd also recommend using StringComparison, as per my answer. If you are going to use input.ToLower(), I'd at least only call it once.) –  Jon Skeet Sep 15 '10 at 11:05
    
yep good points Jon, I should probably fix that... –  Richard J. Ross III Sep 15 '10 at 11:18
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how about this.

bool theanswer = input.Equals("Y", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase);

or yet safer version.

bool theanswer = "Y".Equals(input, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase);
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1  
If input is null it will give you an error. Better use the equals on "y" since that cannot not be a null. –  Gertjan Sep 15 '10 at 10:52
    
I agree with you. –  this. __curious_geek Sep 15 '10 at 10:56
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Or this?

bool CastToBoolean(string input)
{
    return input.Equals("Y", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase);
}
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class Program
{
    void StringInput(string str)
    {
        string[] st1 = str.Split(' ');

        if (st1 != null)
        {
            string a = str.Substring(0, 1);
            string b=str.Substring(str.Length-1,1);

             if(
                a=="^" && b=="^" 
                || a=="{" && b=="}" 
                || a=="[" && b=="]"
                ||a=="<" && b==">" 
                ||a=="(" && b==")"
                )

            {
                Console.Write("ok Formate correct");
            }
            else
            {
                Console.Write("Sorry incorrect formate...");
            }
        }
    }
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        ubaid: ;
        Program one = new Program();
        Console.Write("For exit Press N ");
        Console.Write("\n");
        Console.Write("Enter your value...=");
        string ub = Console.ReadLine();

        if (ub == "Y" || ub=="y" || ub=="N" || ub=="n" )
        {
            Console.Write("Are your want to Exit Y/N: ");
            string ui = Console.ReadLine();
            if (ui == "Y" || ui=="y")
            {
                return;
            }
            else
            {
                goto ubaid;
            }

        }
        one.StringInput(ub);           
        Console.ReadLine();
        goto ubaid;
    }
}
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My idea was to produce something small and concise, this code is way too much. –  wonea Mar 24 '11 at 12:30
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