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For my clustering gui, I am currently using random colors for the clusters, since I won't know before hand how many clusters I will end up with.

In python, this looks like:

import random
def randomColor():
    return (random.random(),random.random(),random.random())

However, when I update things, the colors change. So what I would favor is to have a function which has an input argument i such as

def nonrandomColor(i):
   ...
   return color

would always return the same color for the same i, while keeping the ability to generate arbitrarily many colors.

Answer does not have to be formulated in python, it's more the general layout I'm interested in.

share|improve this question
    
Clearly what you want is a three-dimensional generalization of the urinal protocol blog.xkcd.com/2009/09/02/urinal-protocol-vulnerability , preferably in HSL space so you can put bounds on saturation and lightness to guarantee a decent amount of contrast. ...or maybe I'm overthinking it. –  Jason Orendorff Sep 15 '10 at 12:55
    
In the spirit of overthinking, using sub-random sequences for colors should provide some contrast. –  Muhammad Alkarouri Sep 15 '10 at 13:17

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just set the seed of the random generator to the index, this might be cheaper than storing the colors.

random.seed(i)

Note that this will make random numbers way less random than before. If that is a problem, e.g. if your application uses random numbers elsewhere, you might want to look into the caching options suggested by other answers.

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This did the trick. Nice with a one line extention. –  Theodor Sep 15 '10 at 12:40
3  
-1 because frequently setting your random seed causes your random number generator to be highly non-random. This would be a bad idea if your program also uses random numbers for anything else. –  Jason Orendorff Sep 15 '10 at 12:42
    
@Jason: agreed, I'll add some words to point that out. –  unwind Sep 15 '10 at 12:45
4  
One way to avoid messing with your random number generator is to use a specialised one for the colors. color_rnd = random.Random(); color_rnd.seed(i) –  Muhammad Alkarouri Sep 15 '10 at 13:05

One way is to use caching. Use a defaultdict:

>>> import random
>>> def randomColor():
...    return (random.random(),random.random(),random.random())
... 
>>> from collections import defaultdict
>>> colors = defaultdict(randomColor)
>>> colors[3]
(0.10726172906719755, 0.97327604757295705, 0.58935794305308264)
>>> colors[1]
(0.48991106537516382, 0.77039712435566876, 0.73707003166893892)
>>> colors[3]
(0.10726172906719755, 0.97327604757295705, 0.58935794305308264)
share|improve this answer
    
Setting the first few entries of the dict to easily distinguishable colors (red, yellow, green, blue) up front will decrease your chance of producing a graph with lines in blue, blue, blue, and blue. –  Jason Orendorff Sep 15 '10 at 12:40
    
@Jason: your idea is useful. The risk of the colors being various shades of blue is not high, but having the first few colors static also makes the graph more understandable. –  Muhammad Alkarouri Sep 15 '10 at 13:16

If you want repeatable non colliding colors then you could use something like the function below. It sections the number into 1, 10, 100 and then uses them as the RGB parts of the color.

def color(i):
  r = i % 10
  g = (i//10) % 10
  b = (i//100) % 10
  return(r*25, g*25, b*25)

For example:

color(1) == (25,0,0)
color(10) == (0,25,0)
color(999) = (225,225,255)
share|improve this answer

You want to store the colors in a dictionary or a list:

colors = {} # int -> color
def nonrandomColor(i):
   if i not in colors:
      colors[i] = randomColor()
   return colors[i] 
share|improve this answer

You can use i to seed the random number generator. So, as long as the seed remains the same, you get the same value.

>>> import random
>>> random.seed(12)
>>> random.randint(0,255), random.randint(0,255), random.randint(0,255)
(121, 168, 170)
>>> random.seed(12)
>>> random.randint(0,255), random.randint(0,255), random.randint(0,255)
(121, 168, 170)
>>> random.seed(10)
>>> random.randint(0,255), random.randint(0,255), random.randint(0,255)
(146, 109, 147)
>>> random.seed(10)
>>> random.randint(0,255), random.randint(0,255), random.randint(0,255)
(146, 109, 147)

Depending on the number of colours you're likely to generate (i.e., 10 or a million), the caching method might be better than the seed() method.

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