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Why should a static method in java accept only final or non final variables within its method, but not static?

For example I have the following method:

public static void myfunc(int somethig)
{                                      
  int a=10;                            
  final int b=20;                      
  static int c=30;   //gives Error why?
}
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final and static are orthogonal concepts. It's not as if there are (or could be) three options, as suggested by the question. Where static variables are allowed, they may be final or non-final regardless of being static or non-static. –  Carl Manaster Sep 16 '10 at 14:54

5 Answers 5

up vote -1 down vote accepted

Since every function in java has to be inside a class, you can get the same effect by declaring fields in your class. It's the simplest way, and java language designers are very conservative. They'd never add a feature like that, when there's a more obvious and less complex way to do the same thing.

EDIT: I guess philosophically functions aren't first class in java. They're not supposed to store data. Classes are, and they do.

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It is not the same effect: now all methods in the class have access to the variable. –  reinierpost Sep 16 '10 at 8:23
1  
ok, but I think in practice, it's totally useless to be able to do that, since if you have access to the source code to one function, you'll be able to see the code of the others. There are no benefits of encapsulation to be gained by limiting the access from functions within the same class. There's no 'information hiding' if you can see it. If that deserves a '-1', I'll take it with pride :-). –  gtrak Sep 16 '10 at 14:34
    
Thanks for suggestion –  Android_programmer_office Sep 20 '10 at 8:53

The question is: why not?

Consider this: what would a static local variable mean?

I suggest that the only sensible meaning would be that this:

public class Foo {
    static int bar = 21;
    public void foo() {
        static int bar = 42;  // static local
        return bar;
    }
}

is equivalent to this:

public class Foo {
    static int bar = 21;
    private static foo$bar = 42;  // equivalent to static local
    public void foo() {
        return bar;
    }
}

In other words, (hypothetical) static locals would be equivalent to regular static attributes with slightly different visibility rules.

The Java language designers probably considered this, and decided that static locals added so little of real value that they were not worth including in the language. (Certainly, that's the way I would have voted.)

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that's a decent answer. It is true that such a feature would be rarely used and would have a C++ smell, but still sometimes I really miss that neat trick. There are times when all I need is "a local with slightly different visibility rules". And I don't really understand how can people compare it with a notorious goto operator. Goto is a crap by definition, static locals aren't –  nixau Sep 15 '10 at 17:06
2  
@nixau - the fact that you miss them at all says something about your programming style. Generally speaking, it is good style to avoid using statics, and when you have to use them to use the Singleton design pattern. –  Stephen C Sep 15 '10 at 22:24
    
@Stephen C: I think you're turning this argument upside down: the fact that Java doesn't offer them at all necessitates the Singleton pattern, which I rarely need in other languages. Most patterns are workarounds for lacking features in the Java language. If the language supported them instead, they would be much easier to recognize by developers and by compile-time tools so it would be easier to apply them correctly. –  reinierpost Sep 16 '10 at 8:28
1  
@reinierpost - no I am not. The reason that statics are frowned upon is nothing to do to with not having static locals. It is because statics lead to problems making applications reentrant, problems exploiting parallelism, problems with reusing code and so on. –  Stephen C Sep 16 '10 at 9:33
    
@Stephen C common dude, you're exaggerating. it's a simple static local variable which is not visible outside the method scope. If the dev is stupid enough to call such a method from muliple threads without applying any synchronization primitives of the language than you may expect far more serious flaws in the code he produces. The designers of Java language have made this decision and I'm OK with that. However, I've come across several situations where my code would definitely benefit from using the static locals feature. –  nixau Sep 16 '10 at 10:06

In Java (in Object Oriented Programming in general), objects carry state. Methods should share state through objects attributes, not through static local variables.

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You can't have static local variable. It doesn't really make sense.

However you can have a static field in your class.


Resources :

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Why it doesn't make sense? It should make sense, since C++ made it possible. And it was not only for backwards compatibility with C. Otherwise C++ would only allow static local variables in functions, not methods. –  fjsj Sep 15 '10 at 13:12
1  
@fjsj I'm not an expert in C++, what I'm saying is that there is no need for such things which could be hard to understand (as operator overloading etc.). java is like that, some choices have been made by its creators to make it easy as possible to understand. –  Colin Hebert Sep 15 '10 at 13:14
1  
And to tell the truth, it would be (I exagerate obviously) like asking "why there isn't goto in java whereas there is goto in C and C++" –  Colin Hebert Sep 15 '10 at 13:18
    
@Colin HEBERT "some choices have been made by its creators to make it easy as possible to understand." - now that is answering the question! –  fjsj Sep 15 '10 at 13:19
    
@Colin Hebert I personally think that your statement about the ease of understanding is correct only for the 4th edition of the language. That one that didn't have generics and crazy enums in it (annotations were fine however). When Java 5 hit the floor it was a disaster for me - great libraries had to be consumed by a crapy language. It was designed more with C# in mind. The features it introduces have definitely failed to meet the aforementioned goal to be as possible to understand. –  nixau Sep 17 '10 at 17:38

You can not have a static variable. There is no such thing. You can have a class variable as static instead.

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Thanks for suggestion –  Android_programmer_office Sep 20 '10 at 8:53

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