Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using NumPy with Python 2.6.2. I'm trying to create a small (length 3), simple boolean array. The following gives me a MemoryError, which I think it ought not to.

import numpy as np
cond = np.fromiter((x in [2] for x in [0, 1, 2]), dtype = np.bool)

The error it gives me is:

MemoryError: cannot allocate array memory

However, the following method of obtaining a list (as opposed to an ndarray) works fine (without using numpy):

cond = list((x in [2] for x in [0, 1, 2]))

Have I done anything wrong in the Numpy code? My feeling is that it ought to work.

share|improve this question
1  
Your first code works for me as is. Can you post the versions of Python and Numpy? –  Muhammad Alkarouri Sep 15 '10 at 12:13
    
For what it's worth, I can reproduce the problem using python 2.5 and numpy 1.1, but not with anything newer. On the older versions, it works fine if you manually specify the count kwarg (count=3, in this case). However, that defeats the purpose of using np.fromiter in the first place. I assmume it's a bug in numpy that's been fixed somewhere between 1.1 and 1.5? –  Joe Kington Sep 15 '10 at 13:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I can reproduce the problem with numpy 1.1 (but not with anything newer). Obviously, upgrading to a more recent version of numpy is your best bet.

Nonetheless, it seems to be related to using np.bool as the dtype when count=-1 (the default: Read all items in the iterator, instead of a set number).

A quick workaround is just to create it as an int array and then convert it to a boolean array:

cond = np.fromiter((x in [2] for x in [0, 1, 2]), dtype=np.int).astype(np.bool)

An alternative is to convert it to a list, and then set count to the length of the list (or just use np.asarray on the list):

items = list((x in [2] for x in [0, 1, 2]))
cond = np.fromiter(items, dtype=np.bool, count=len(items))

Obviously, both of these are suboptimal, but if you can't upgrade to a more recent version of numpy, they will work.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: nice workaround. –  EOL Sep 15 '10 at 13:58
    
Thank you! I did suspect it was a bug/version thing. –  Underflow Sep 20 '10 at 12:59

You should not get any error.

With Python 2.6.5 or Python 2.7, and Numpy 1.5.0, I don't get any error. I therefore think that updating your software could very well solve the problem that you observe.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I can't get a new version of numpy right now so I'll just work around it. –  Underflow Sep 20 '10 at 13:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.