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Possible Duplicate:
Why doesn't Ruby support i++ or i— for fixnum?

Why is there no increment operator in Ruby?

e.g.

i++
++i

Is the ++ operator used for something else? Is there a real reason for this?

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marked as duplicate by Mladen Jablanović, Jörg W Mittag, Mizipzor, Roger Pate, dmckee Sep 15 '10 at 16:49

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

12  
What's "REAL"? Can you define "REAL reason" in a way that's not argumentative and subjective? – S.Lott Sep 15 '10 at 12:27
2  
Check your terminology … “auto increment” is something completely different. What you have there is a simple increment operator. – Konrad Rudolph Sep 15 '10 at 12:28
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I agree with @Kondrad, this is just increment rather than auto increment (or preincrement and postincrement if you need to disambiguate the two.) Also it is an operator rather than an operand. I will make edits to the question to tidy this up. I hope that is OK. – mikej Sep 15 '10 at 12:56
    
This duplicate has more up-votes than the original. – Sam Eaton Sep 10 '15 at 15:46

Ruby has no pre/post increment/decrement operator. For instance, x++ or x-- will fail to parse. More importantly, ++x or --x will do nothing! In fact, they behave as multiple unary prefix operators: -x == ---x == -----x == ...... To increment a number, simply write x += 1.

Taken from things that newcomers to ruby should know (link updated to use cached page, original link is broken)

That explains it better than I ever could.

EDIT: and the reason from the author himself (source):

  1. ++ and -- are NOT reserved operator in Ruby.
  2. C's increment/decrement operators are in fact hidden assignment. They affect variables, not objects. You cannot accomplish assignment via method. Ruby uses +=/-= operator instead.
  3. Self cannot be a target of assignment. In addition, altering the value of integer 1 might cause severe confusion throughout the program.
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3  
It's valid with respect to this question, but I wish "Things That Newcomers to Ruby Should Know." was updated to reflect Ruby 1.9. – Andrew Grimm Nov 1 '11 at 22:55
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Regarding point #3, since most things are objects, imagine if Ruby allowed you to do this: 1++ 1+2 # Would not be 3! – John Syrinek Feb 5 '13 at 13:46
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I feel like arguing that 1++ means we shouldn't have the ++ operator at all suggests that 1+=1 is similarly bad and therefore we shouldn't have += either, but we do. So there must be a deeper reason that Matz didn't include it. Maybe the syntactic sugar required to implement this messed up another part of the parser? Dunno, but it can't just be that self assignment to literals is invalid b/c lots of other stuff in Ruby prevents assigning literals just fine. – Steve Midgley Sep 17 '14 at 3:26
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@steveMidgley I should've included the source for that second quote from the author - blade.nagaokaut.ac.jp/cgi-bin/scat.rb/ruby/ruby-talk/2710. – Dave Sep 18 '14 at 7:45
    
@Dave Thanks. It seems like the core issue is in #2 - the assignment affects the variable not the object inside Ruby? Since variables aren't objects (I think variables are only things that aren't objects), you can't use object methods to solve this problem. It appears this would be a good example of why Ruby is very close to "objects all the way down" but not quite. – Steve Midgley Oct 20 '14 at 18:55

From a posting by Matz:

(1) ++ and -- are NOT reserved operator in Ruby.

(2) C's increment/decrement operators are in fact hidden assignment. They affect variables, not objects. You cannot accomplish assignment via method. Ruby uses +=/-= operator instead.

(3) self cannot be a target of assignment. In addition, altering the value of integer 1 might cause severe confusion throughout the program.

                      matz.
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Surely they could be methods on the variable object…? – Donal Fellows Sep 15 '10 at 12:34
1  
@Donal if you mean, could they be retrospectively be added to the language without breaking things then I don't think they could. x = a++b parses as x = a + (+b) so if we had just x++ then Ruby expects another operand. This is why you tend to get syntax errors if you try to use ++ at the moment as Ruby takes part of the next statement as the operand. += is implemented as call + on the receiver passing the RHS as a parameter and then assign the value returned by + to the variable. – mikej Sep 15 '10 at 12:53
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@Donal Fellows: variables aren't objects in Ruby. – Jörg W Mittag Sep 15 '10 at 14:09
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I know they can't be done syntactically without breaking backward compatibility, and I think that Matz is right not to do them, but the argument that increment can't be done because of hidden assignment is in general wrong. If variables are objects then increment is naturally a method on the class of variables. Don't know if such a concept sits well with Ruby's model of the world. :-) – Donal Fellows Sep 15 '10 at 14:10
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@Donal Fellows: But variables aren't objects in Ruby, that's why post-increment can't be implemented as a method on variable objects. – Jörg W Mittag Sep 15 '10 at 16:00

I don't think that notation is available because—unlike say PHP or C—everything in Ruby is an object.

Sure you could use $var=0; $var++ in PHP, but that's because it's a variable and not an object. Therefore, $var = new stdClass(); $var++ would probably throw an error.

I'm not a Ruby or RoR programmer, so I'm sure someone can verify the above or rectify it if it's inaccurate.

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