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I want to override access to one variable in a class, but return all others normally. How do I accomplish this with __getattribute__?

I tried the following (which should also illustrate what I'm trying to do) but I get a recursion error:

class D(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.test=20
        self.test2=21
    def __getattribute__(self,name):
        if name=='test':
            return 0.
        else:
            return self.__dict__[name]

>>> print D().test
0.0
>>> print D().test2
...
RuntimeError: maximum recursion depth exceeded in cmp
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5 Answers 5

up vote 50 down vote accepted

You get a recursion error because you call the same function, your __getattribute__. If you use object's __getattribute__ instead, it works:

class D(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.test=20
        self.test2=21
    def __getattribute__(self,name):
        if name=='test':
            return 0.
        else:
            return object.__getattribute__(self, name)

This works because object (in this example) is the base class. By calling the base version of __getattribute__ you avoid the recursive hell you were in before.

Ipython output with code in foo.py:

In [1]: from foo import *

In [2]: d = D()

In [3]: d.test
Out[3]: 0.0

In [4]: d.test2
Out[4]: 21

Update:

There's something in the section titled More attribute access for new-style classes in the current documentation, where they recommend doing exactly this to avoid the infinite recursion.

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1  
Interesting. So what are you doing there? Why would object have my variables? –  Greg Dec 16 '08 at 16:27
1  
Yes, each time you create a class and you don't write your own, you use the getattribute supplied by object. –  Egil Dec 16 '08 at 16:33
1  
Egil: That's not an entirely safe way to look at it. If I'm using a class that inherits another class, that inherits another class that inherits object (and I didn't write any of the inherited classes) If one of those overrides getattribute and you call object's version, it might not work as ... –  Oli Dec 16 '08 at 16:37
4  
isn't it better to use super() and thus use the first getattribute method python finds in your base classes? - super(D, self).__getattribute__(name) –  gepatino Aug 7 '12 at 13:05
1  
Or you can just use super().__getattribute__(name) in Python 3. –  JeromeJ Nov 12 '13 at 13:01

Actually, I believe you want to use the __getattr__ special method instead.

Quote from the Python docs:

__getattr__( self, name)

Called when an attribute lookup has not found the attribute in the usual places (i.e. it is not an instance attribute nor is it found in the class tree for self). name is the attribute name. This method should return the (computed) attribute value or raise an AttributeError exception.
Note that if the attribute is found through the normal mechanism, __getattr__() is not called. (This is an intentional asymmetry between __getattr__() and __setattr__().) This is done both for efficiency reasons and because otherwise __setattr__() would have no way to access other attributes of the instance. Note that at least for instance variables, you can fake total control by not inserting any values in the instance attribute dictionary (but instead inserting them in another object). See the __getattribute__() method below for a way to actually get total control in new-style classes.

Note: for this to work, the instance should not have a test attribute, so the line self.test=20 should be removed.

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1  
Actually, according to the nature of the OP's code, overriding __getattr__ for test would be useless, since it would always find it "in the usual places". –  Darthfett Feb 29 '12 at 20:53
    
@Darthfett: you're right, I'll update my answer. –  tzot Mar 1 '12 at 10:04

Python language reference:

In order to avoid infinite recursion in this method, its implementation should always call the base class method with the same name to access any attributes it needs, for example, object.getattribute(self, name).

Meaning:

def __getattribute__(self,name):
    ...
        return self.__dict__[name]

You're calling for an attribute called __dict__. Because it's an attribute __getattribute__ get's called in search for __dict__ which calls __getattribute__ which calls ... yada yada yada

return  object.__getattribute__(self, name)

Using the base classes __getattribute__ helps finding the real attribute.

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Are you sure you want to use getattribute? What are you actually trying to achieve?

The easiest way to do what you ask is:

class D(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.test = 20
        self.test2 = 21

    test = 0

or:

class D(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.test = 20
        self.test2 = 21

    @property
    def test(self):
        return 0

Edit: Note that an instance of D would have different values of test in each case. In the first case d.test would be 20, in the second it would be 0. I'll leave it to you to work out why.

Edit2: Greg pointed out that example 2 will fail because the property is read only and the __init__ method tried to set it to 20. A more complete example for that would be:

class D(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.test = 20
        self.test2 = 21

    _test = 0

    def get_test(self):
        return self._test

    def set_test(self, value):
        self._test = value

    test = property(get_test, set_test)

Obviously, as a class this is almost entirely useless, but it gives you an idea to move on from.

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this really should be the accepted answer. maybe add a short version of Egil's answer to actually answer the original question. –  hop Dec 16 '08 at 16:40
    
Great thinking outside the box. Much cleaner way to accomplish it. –  Egil Dec 16 '08 at 16:43
1  
Thanks. The correct answer to almost any question is "What are you actually trying to achieve?" –  Singletoned Dec 16 '08 at 16:56
    
Oh that doesn't quiet work when you run the class though, no? File "Script1.py", line 5, in init self.test = 20 AttributeError: can't set attribute –  Greg Dec 16 '08 at 17:06
    
True. I'll fix that up as a third example. Well spotted. –  Singletoned Dec 16 '08 at 23:14

Here is a more reliable version:

class D(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.test = 20
        self.test2 = 21
    def __getattribute__(self, name):
        if name == 'test':
            return 0.
        else:
            return super(D, self).__getattribute__(name)

It calls __getattribute__ method from parent class, eventually falling back to object.__getattribute__ method if other ancestors don't override it.

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