Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I'm trying to read in a text file in a c# application, but I don't want to read the first two lines, or the last line. There's 8 lines in the file, so effectivly I just want to read in lines, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7. Is there any way to do this?

example file

USE [Shelley's Other Database]
CREATE TABLE db.exmpcustomers(
fName varchar(100) NULL,
lName varchar(100) NULL,
dateOfBirth date NULL,
houseNumber int NULL,
streetName varchar(100) NULL
) ON [PRIMARY]

EDIT

Okay, so, I've implemented Callum Rogers answer into my code and for some reason it works with my edited text file (I created a text file with the lines I didn't want to use omitted) and it does exactly what it should, but whenever I try it with the original text file (above) it throws an exception. I display this information in a DataGrid and I think that's where the exception is being thrown.

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
+1 for posting the example file which allows us to give more precise help. – chiccodoro Sep 16 '10 at 6:13
    
Concerning your edit: I don't understand what you mean by your "edited file". When it comes to your DataGrid and an exception being thrown, my advice: 1) Post this as a new question; 2) never speak of "an exception". Tell us what exception (class name + message). – chiccodoro Sep 16 '10 at 12:56
    
@chiccodoro: Okay, thank for the advice, I'm grateful! But I am new to this website, I'm just trying to get help with my program.. I don't really know the accepted etiquette of stack overflow! – New Start Sep 16 '10 at 13:24
    
Don't worry, it's not about the Netiquette, I'm just saying that we need more information to be able to help you. – chiccodoro Sep 16 '10 at 13:36
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Why do you want to ignore exactly the first two and the last line?

Depending on what your file looks like you might want to analyze the line, e.g. look at the first character whether it is a comment sign, or ignore everything until you find the first empty line, etc.

Sometimes, hardcoding "magic" numbers isn't such a good idea. What if the file format needs to be changed to contain 3 header lines?

As the other answers demonstrate: Nothing keeps you from doing what you ever want with a line you have read, so of course, you can ignore it, too.

Edit, now that you've provided an example of your file: For your case I'd definitely not use the hardcoded numbers approach. What if some day the SQL statement should contain another field, or if it appears on one instead of 8 lines?

My suggestion: Read in the whole string at once, then analyze it. Safest way would be to use a grammar, but if you presume the SQL statement is never going to be more complicated, you can use a regular expression (still much better than using line numbers etc.):

string content = File.ReadAllText(filename);
Regex r = new Regex(@"CREATE TABLE [^\(]+\((.*)\) ON");
string whatYouWant = r.Match(content).Groups[0].Value;
share|improve this answer
    
The why is very important here I think, a bit more information about what you're trying to do could lead to better solutions being offered – AidanO Sep 15 '10 at 13:52
    
I Agree... Consider using separators or keywords to read the file. F.E. first 3 lines are used as header and the forth line starts with &&my_separator&& and then just search for the byte index of the separator and jump directly to it. as for the last line use the separator again and read everything between the separators. this way if the format of the file is modified you won't have to change your code. – GxG Sep 15 '10 at 13:59
    
I've posted an exmaple of the file I'm trying to read in.. – New Start Sep 15 '10 at 13:59
1  
If you look at his edited question, it would be a bad idea to delimit parts of that code with separators. And doing something like this to SQL rather than just running it does seem like it could be massively dodgy. – Callum Rogers Sep 15 '10 at 14:02
    
No in that case a delimiter isn't a great idea, but it's still possible to use a regex e.g. I've edited my answer accordingly. – chiccodoro Sep 15 '10 at 14:39

The Answer by Rogers is good, I am just providing another way of doing this. Try this,

List<string> list = new List<string>();
using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(FilePath))
{
    string text = "";
    while ((text = reader.ReadLine()) != null)
    {
        list.Add(text);
    }
    list.RemoveAt(0);
    list.RemoveAt(0);
 }

Hope this helps

share|improve this answer

Why not just use File.ReadAllLines() and then remove the first 2 lines and the last line? With such a small file speed differences will not be noticeable.

string[] allLines = File.ReadAllLines("file.ext");
string[] linesWanted = new string[allLines.Length-3];
Array.Copy(allLines, 2, linesWanted, 0, allLines.Length-3);
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Simple solution. – Skurmedel Sep 15 '10 at 13:40
    
Technically, this does read all lines. – Caspar Kleijne Sep 15 '10 at 13:48
2  
@Caspar: I don't think it is possible to not read all the lines unless you know the byte index of where the third line and last line start. This is because you have to scan the file until you find the first 2 \n\r? before you can exclude all data before it and similarly for the last line you have to find the linebreak for the penultimate line. – Callum Rogers Sep 15 '10 at 13:52
    
@Downvoter: Why did you downvote? What is your criticism of my answer? – Callum Rogers Sep 15 '10 at 13:57
    
+1 Makes the most sense, is easy to implement, managed properly - probably uses least memory as well – Joel Etherton Sep 15 '10 at 14:04

If you have a TextReader object wrapping the filestream you could just call ReadLine() two times.

StreamReader inherits from TextReader, which is abstract.

Non-fool proof example:

using (var fs = new FileStream("blah", FileMode.Open))
using (var reader = new StreamReader(fs))
{
    reader.ReadLine();
    reader.ReadLine();

    // Do stuff.
}
share|improve this answer
    
This dosen't ignore the last line.... – AidanO Sep 15 '10 at 13:50
1  
Let's say I left that out as an excercise :) – Skurmedel Sep 15 '10 at 13:53
string filepath = @"C:\whatever.txt";
using (StreamReader rdr = new StreamReader(filepath))
{
    rdr.ReadLine();  // ignore 1st line
    rdr.ReadLine();  // ignore 2nd line
    string fileContents = "";
    while (true)
    {
        string line = rdr.ReadLine();
        if (rdr.EndOfStream)
            break;  // finish without processing last line
        fileContents += line + @"\r\n";
    }
    Console.WriteLine(fileContents);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Just to make it system independent, you could use Environment.NewLine instead of \r\n. – Callum Rogers Sep 15 '10 at 14:16
    
@Callum. Thanks for reminding me! – Andy Johnson Sep 15 '10 at 14:33

How about a general solution?

To me, the first step is to enumerate over the lines of a file (already provided by ReadAllLines, but that has a performance cost due to populating an entire string[] array; there's also ReadLines, but that's only available as of .NET 4.0).

Implementing this is pretty trivial:

public static IEnumerable<string> EnumerateLines(this FileInfo file)
{
    using (var reader = file.OpenText())
    {
        while (!reader.EndOfStream)
        {
            yield return reader.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

The next step is to simply skip the first two lines of this enumerable sequence. This is straightforward using the Skip extension method.

The last step is to ignore the last line of the enumerable sequence. Here's one way you could implement this:

public static IEnumerable<T> IgnoreLast<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int ignoreCount)
{
    if (ignoreCount < 0)
    {
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("ignoreCount");
    }

    var buffer = new Queue<T>();
    foreach (T value in source)
    {
        if (buffer.Count < ignoreCount)
        {
            buffer.Enqueue(value);
            continue;
        }

        T buffered = buffer.Dequeue();

        buffer.Enqueue(value);

        yield return buffered;
    }
}

OK, then. Putting it all together, we have:

var file = new FileInfo(@"path\to\file.txt");
var lines = file.EnumerateLines().Skip(2).IgnoreLast(1);

Test input (contents of file):

This is line number 1.
This is line number 2.
This is line number 3.
This is line number 4.
This is line number 5.
This is line number 6.
This is line number 7.
This is line number 8.
This is line number 9.
This is line number 10.

Output (of Skip(2).IgnoreLast(1)):

This is line number 3.
This is line number 4.
This is line number 5.
This is line number 6.
This is line number 7.
This is line number 8.
This is line number 9.
share|improve this answer

You can do this:

var valid = new int[] { 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 };
var lines = File.ReadAllLines("file.txt").
    Where((line, index) => valid.Contains(index + 1));

Or the opposite:

var invalid = new int[] { 1, 2, 8 };
var lines = File.ReadAllLines("file.txt").
    Where((line, index) => !invalid.Contains(index + 1));

If you're looking for a general way to remove the last and the first 2, you can use this:

var allLines = File.ReadAllLines("file.txt");
var lines = allLines
  .Take(allLines.Length - 1)
  .Skip(2);

But from your example it seems that you're better off looking for the string pattern that you want to read from the file. Try using regexes.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.