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Why is Java Comparable used? Why would someone implement Comparable in a class? I've seen it I'm just wondering what it is for.

Can someone give me real life example when would you implement comparable?

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2  
Related: When to use Comparable vs Comparator and Sorting an ArrayList. –  BalusC Sep 15 '10 at 14:08

9 Answers 9

up vote 95 down vote accepted

Here is a real life sample. Note that String also implements Comparable.

class Author implements Comparable<Author>{
    String firstName;
    String lastName;

    @Override
    public int compareTo(Author other){
        // compareTo should return < 0 if this is supposed to be
        // less than other, > 0 if this is supposed to be greater than 
        // other and 0 if they are supposed to be equal
        int last = this.lastName.compareTo(other.lastName);
        return last == 0 ? this.firstName.compareTo(other.firstName) : last;
    }
}

later..

/**
 * List the authors. Sort them by name so it will look good.
 */
public List<Author> listAuthors(){
    List<Author> authors = readAuthorsFromFileOrSomething();
    Collections.sort(authors);
    return authors;
}

/**
 * List unique authors. Sort them by name so it will look good.
 */
public SortedSet<Author> listUniqueAuthors(){
    List<Author> authors = readAuthorsFromFileOrSomething();
    return new TreeSet<Author>(authors);
}
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3  
+1 for a good "real world" example –  Angelo Genovese Sep 15 '10 at 15:32
7  
I just want to note that often you'll want to override equals (and therefore hashCode) to be consistent with your compareTo method. For example, this is necessary if you want the class to play nice with a TreeSet. –  pidge Nov 26 '12 at 6:51
    
Why not simply return last? –  Anirban Nag 'tintinmj' Jan 16 at 17:05

Comparable defines a natural ordering. What this means is that you're defining it when one object should be considered "less than" or "greater than".

Suppose you have a bunch of integers and you want to sort them. That's pretty easy, just put them in a sorted collection, right?

TreeSet<Integer> m = new TreeSet<Integer>(); 
m.add(1);
m.add(3);
m.add(2);
for (Integer i : m)
... // values will be sorted

But now suppose I have some custom object, where sorting makes sense to me, but is undefined. Let's say, I have data representing districts by zipcode with population density, and I want to sort them by density:

public class District {
  String zipcode; 
  Double populationDensity;
}

Now the easiest way to sort them is to define them with a natural ordering by implementing Comparable, which means there's a standard way these objects are defined to be ordered.:

public class District implements Comparable<District>{
  String zipcode; 
  Double populationDensity;
  public int compareTo(District other)
  {
    return populationDensity.compareTo(other.populationDensity);
  }
}

Note that you can do the equivalent thing by defining a comparator. The difference is that the comparator defines the ordering logic outside the object. Maybe in a separate process I need to order the same objects by zipcode - in that case the ordering isn't necessarily a property of the object, or differs from the objects natural ordering. You could use an external comparator to define a custom ordering on integers, for example by sorting them by their alphabetical value.

Basically the ordering logic has to exist somewhere. That can be -

  • in the object itself, if it's naturally comparable (extends Comparable -e.g. integers)

  • supplied in an external comparator, as in the example above.

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good example, but it has to be TreeSet<Integer> instead of TreeMap<Integer>, for the latter does not exist, TreeMaps are always <Key,Value>-pairs. Btw, a hypothetical TreeMap<District, Object> would only work, if District implemented Comparable, right? Still trying to understand this –  Blauhirn Jan 31 at 16:25

Quoted from the javadoc;

This interface imposes a total ordering on the objects of each class that implements it. This ordering is referred to as the class's natural ordering, and the class's compareTo method is referred to as its natural comparison method.

Lists (and arrays) of objects that implement this interface can be sorted automatically by Collections.sort (and Arrays.sort). Objects that implement this interface can be used as keys in a sorted map or as elements in a sorted set, without the need to specify a comparator.

Edit: ..and made the important bit bold.

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3  
I'd say that the sentence after the one you've bolded is just as (if not more) important. –  Michael Borgwardt Sep 15 '10 at 14:12

The fact that a class implements Comparable means that you can take two objects from that class and compare them. Some classes, like certain collections (sort function in a collection) that keep objects in order rely on them being comparable (in order to sort you need to know which object is the "biggest" and so forth).

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An easy way to implement multiple field comparisons is with Guava's ComparisonChain - then you can say

   public int compareTo(Foo that) {
     return ComparisonChain.start()
         .compare(lastName, that.lastName)
         .compare(firstName, that.firstName)
         .compare(zipCode, that.zipCode)
         .result();
   }

instead of

  public int compareTo(Person other) {
    int cmp = lastName.compareTo(other.lastName);
    if (cmp != 0) {
      return cmp;
    }
    cmp = firstName.compareTo(other.firstName);
    if (cmp != 0) {
      return cmp;
    }
    return Integer.compare(zipCode, other.zipCode);
  }
}
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Most of the examples above show how to reuse an existing comparable object in the compareTo function. If you would like to implement your own compareTo when you want to compare two objects of the same class, say an AirlineTicket object that you would like to sort by price(less is ranked first), followed by number of stopover (again, less is ranked first), you would do the following:

class AirlineTicket implements Comparable<Cost>
{
    public double cost;
    public int stopovers;
    public AirlineTicket(double cost, int stopovers)
    {
        this.cost = cost; this.stopovers = stopovers ;
    }

    public int compareTo(Cost o)
    {
        if(this.cost != o.cost)
          return Double.compare(this.cost, o.cost); //sorting in ascending order. 
        if(this.stopovers != o.stopovers)
          return this.stopovers - o.stopovers; //again, ascending but swap the two if you want descending
        return 0;            
    }
}
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For example when you want to have a sorted collection or map

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What Fernando means is: if you store "things" that implement Comparable in a sorted container class, the sorted container class can automatically order those "things". –  Ian Durkan Mar 30 '12 at 18:51

Comparable is used to compare instances of your class. We can compare instances from many ways that why we need to implement a method comparareTo in order to know how(attributes) we want to compare instances.

package test; import java.util.Comparator; public class Dog { private String dogName; public Dog(String name) { dogName = name; } public String getName() { return dogName; } public int compareTo(Dog anotherDog) throws ClassCastException { return this.dogName.compareTo(anotherDog.getName()); } public static Comparator NameComparator = new Comparator() { public int compare(Object dog1, Object anotherDog) { String dogName1 = ((Dog) dog1).getName(); String dogName2 = ((Dog) anotherDog).getName(); return dogName1.compareTo(dogName2); } }; } package test; import java.util.Arrays; public class Main { public static void main(String[] args) { Dog d1 = new Dog("brutus"); Dog d2 = new Dog("medor"); Dog d3 = new Dog("ara"); Dog[] dogs = new Dog[3]; dogs[0] = d1; dogs[1] = d2; dogs[2]= d3; for(int i=0;i<3;i++){ System.out.println(dogs[i].getName()); } Arrays.sort(dogs, Dog.NameComparator); for(int i=0;i<3;i++){ System.out.println(dogs[i].getName()); } } }

Here is a good example how to use comparable in Java

http://www.onjava.com/pub/a/onjava/2003/03/12/java_comp.html?page=2

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1  
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  Ty221 Feb 20 '14 at 20:16

When you implement Comparable interface, you need to implement method compareTo. You need it to compare objects, in order to use, for example, sorting method of ArrayList class. You need a way to compare your objects to be able to sort them. So you need a custom compareTo method in your class so you can use it with the ArrayList sort method. The compareTo method returns -1,0,1.

I have just read an according chapter in Java Head 2.0, im still learning.

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