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I was quite surprised when

[] is not []

evaluated to True.

What is happening in this code? What really not and is statements are doing?

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5 Answers

up vote 24 down vote accepted

a is not b is a special operator which is equivalent to not a is b.

The operator a is b returns True if a and b are bound to the same object, otherwise False. When you create two empty lists you get two different objects, so is returns False (and therefore is not returns True).

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2  
if a and b are the same object - I would like are bound to the same object even better. –  Björn Pollex Sep 15 '10 at 14:30
    
@Space_C0wb0y: Fixed. –  Mark Byers Sep 15 '10 at 14:32
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The best way to describe WHY that happens is this:

Here is your example

>>> x = []
>>> y = []
>>> print(x is y)
... False

x and y are actually two different lists, so if you add something to x, it does not appear in y

>>> x.append(1)
>>> print(x)
... [1]
>>> print(y)
... []

So how do we make (x is y) evaluate true?

>>> x = []
>>> y = x
>>> print(x is y)
... True

>>> x.append(10)

>>> print(x)
... [10]
>>> print(y)
... [10]

>>> print(x is y)
... True

if you want to see if two lists have the same contents...

>>> x = []
>>> y = []
>>> print(x == y)
... True

>>> x.append(21)

>>> print(x)
... [21]
>>> print(y)
... []

>>> print(x == y)
... False

>>> y = [21]
>>> print(x == y)
... True
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Excellent answer, but, after reading this in Python reference, I get confused: Due to automatic garbage-collection, free lists, and the dynamic nature of descriptors, you may notice seemingly unusual behaviour in certain uses of the is operator, like those involving comparisons between instance methods, or constants. –  auraham Aug 4 '12 at 3:50
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is checks for identity. [] and [] are two different (but equivalent) lists. If you want to check if both the lists are empty you can use their truth value (false for empty strings, collections, and zeros).

if not ([] and []):
   print 'Spanish Inquisition'

the only time that is is guaranteed to return True is for singletons such as None. Like the Highlander, there can be only one instance of None in your program - every time you return None it's the very same "thing" as the none referred to if you type print None.

[], OTOH, is not guaranteed to be anything except an empty list and evaluate to False in a boolean context.

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a = b. I believe that we are now guaranteed that a is b. –  recursive Sep 15 '10 at 14:38
    
@recursive that is true :) –  Jiaaro Sep 15 '10 at 14:43
    
@recursive, do you know if that's the case for strings/numbers? –  Wayne Werner Sep 16 '10 at 13:59
    
As far as I know, it's true for everything. When you assign b to a in python, you are assigning a to be a reference to the object currently referenced by b. So their identity will be identical. It's python, so it may be possible to do some weird thing like overriding assignment to break this, but in general, I'd say yes. –  recursive Sep 16 '10 at 14:09
    
I guess that makes sense - and is different from a = "hi"; b = "hi" which is behavior is not guaranteed aside from returning True or False. –  Wayne Werner Sep 16 '10 at 14:30
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is is the identity comparison.

== is the equality comparison.

Your statement is making two different lists and checking if they are the same instance, which they are not. If you use == it will return true and because they are both empty lists.

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is means is same instance. It evaluates to true if the variables on either side of the operator point to the same object and false otherwise.

Reference, near the bottom.

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