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H guys, using a windows batch script I am looking to pass a run a command x number of times with a different argument each time, the arguments being parsed in from a file.

For example have a textfile saying arg1 arg 2 arg3, the batch script would parse this and run

program.exe -arg1
program.exe -arg2
program.exe -arg3

I am thinking reading the file line by line into an array then doing a for each loop, but have no experience with windows scripting to do so

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2 Answers 2

Alright, here we go... recall.bat. You always need to provide 1 argument - the executable to call each time. You also need to create an argument file: args.txt by default which should have one argument per line. If the argument has spaces or special characters it should be quote escaped.

Source: recall.bat

@echo off
setLocal EnableDelayedExpansion

::: recall.bat - Call an executable with a series of arguments
:::  usage: recall $exec [$argfile]
:::     exec - the executable to recall with arguments
:::     argfile - the file that contains the arguments, if empty will 
:::               default to args.txt
:::  argfile format:
:::    One argument per line, quote-escaped if there's spaces/special chars
if "%~1"=="" findstr "^:::" "%~f0"&GOTO:EOF

set argfile=args.txt
:: Reset argfile if supplied.
if "%~2" neq "" set argfile="%~2"
:: Remove quotes
set argfile=!argfile:"=!

for /f "tokens=*" %%G in (%argfile%) do (
  call %1 %%G
)

Example:

args.txt

hello
world
"hello world"

Call:

recall echo args.txt

Output:

hello
world
"hello world"
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You should be able to use a for loop. Assuming the file args.txt contains the parameters, then this should work:

for /f %a in (args.txt) do program.exe -%a

Edit Depending on the command processor you are using, you may need to use two % symbols in a row in the command if you run the above statement in a batch file. It is not necessary when using the very nice JP Software command prompt. I think, though, it is necessary with the default cmd.exe/command.com prompts.

for /f %%a in (args.txt) do program.exe -%%a
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