Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was just going through certain code's which are frequently asked in Interview's. I came up with certain doubts, if anyone can help me regarding this? I am totally confused on this now,

#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
#define square(x) x*x

main()
{
      int i,j;
      i=4/square(4);
      j=64/square(4);
      printf("\n %d",i);
      printf("\n %d",j);
      printf("\n %d",square(4));
      getch();
}

Output is :

 4
 64
 16

I am wondering, why did square(4) return 1 when i divided it? i mean how can i get the value 4 and 64 when i divide it but when used directly i get 16!!?

share|improve this question
1  
Just to note that #define square(x) x*x is a clasic C baddy. Try a loop with square(x++); –  Jaydee Sep 15 '10 at 15:33
5  
If you really want to confuse yourself and you haven't read any of the answers yet, try replacing square(4) everywhere with square(3+1). –  JeremyP Sep 15 '10 at 15:40
    
This was a simple precedence problem. –  Fahad Uddin Oct 8 '10 at 21:42
add comment

11 Answers

up vote 22 down vote accepted

square is under-parenthesized: it expands textually, so

#define square(x) x*x
   ...
i=4/square(4);

means

i=4/4*4;

which groups as (4/4) * 4. To fix, add parentheses:

#define square(x) ((x)*(x))

Still a very iffy #define as it evaluates x twice, so square(somefun()) calls the function twice and does not therefore necessarily compute a square but rather the product of the two successive calls, of course;-).

share|improve this answer
    
yea.. got it.. was getting mad over it.. –  LearningNeverStops Sep 15 '10 at 15:47
3  
+1 for square(somefun()). The usual observation in that case is about side effect done twice, but if you imagine square(rand()) you are getting the product of two random numbers, not the square of a single random number. –  RBerteig Sep 15 '10 at 18:42
add comment

When you write i=4/square(4), the preprocessor expands that to i = 4 / 4 * 4.
Because C groups operations from left to right, the compiler interprets that as i = (4 / 4) * 4, which is equivalent to 1 * 4.

You need to add parentheses, like this:

#define square(x) ((x)*(x))

This way, i=4/square(4) turns into i = 4 / ((4) * (4)).
You need the additional parentheses around x in case you write square(1 + 1), which would otherwise turn into 1 + 1 * 1 + 1, which is evaluated as 1 + (1 * 1) + 1, or 3.

share|improve this answer
add comment
i=4/square(4);

expands to

i=4/4*4; 

which equivalent to

i=(4/4)*4;
share|improve this answer
add comment

That's because the compiler replaces it with:

i=4/4*4; 
j=64/4*4;

i = (4/4)*4 = 1*4 = 4.

j = (64/4)*4 = 16*4 = 64.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Operator precedence is hurting you.

The macro is expanded by the pre-processor such that

  i=4/4*4;
  j=64/4*4;

which is equivalent to:

  i=(4/4)*4;
  j=(64/4)*4;
share|improve this answer
add comment

j = 4/square(4) == 4/4*4 == 1*4 == 4

share|improve this answer
add comment

Manually expand the macro in the code, and it will be clear. That is, replace all the square(x) with exactly x*x, in particular don't add any parentheses.

share|improve this answer
add comment

define is just a text macro

main()
{
      int i,j;
      i=4/ 4 * 4;  // 1 * 4
      j=64/4 * 4; // 16 * 4
      printf("\n %d",i);
      printf("\n %d",j);
      printf("\n %d",square(4));
      getch();
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

It's a macro! So it returns exactly what it substitutes.

i = 4/4*4;   Which is 4...
j = 64/4*4;   Which is 16...

Try this for your macro:

#define square(x) ((x)*(x))
share|improve this answer
add comment

Because of operator precedence in the expression after the preprocessor - you'll need to write

#define square(x) (x*x)
share|improve this answer
add comment

As the other answers say, you're getting burned by operator precedence. Change your square macro to this:

#define square(x) (x*x)

and it'll work the way you expect.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.