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I have a list of strings that are just invoice numbers. I am enumerating through this list to get the details of each invoice from the database. This list can easily be 700 to 1000 in size. the way I am doing it now results in 700-1000 connections to the database. this is taking too long to complete is there a better way to do this that I just don't know about? Any pointers would be great.

here is an example of my enumeration

foreach(string i in invoiceList)
{
  Invoice inv = invoiceData.GetInvoice(i);
  //do something with the invoice
}

then here is an example of my data access method using ado.net

public Invoice GetInvoice(string invoice)
{
      SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(//connection string);
      SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("dbo.getInvoices", con);
      cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
      cmd.Parameters.Add("invoice", SqlDbType.VarChar).Value = invoice;
      SqlDataReader dr;
      Invoice inv = new Invoice();
      try{
            con.Open();
            dr = cmd.ExecuteReader
            while(dr.read())
            {
                 //assign values from the database fields
            }


      }
      catch{}
      finally{con.close();}

}

so basically the getInvoice method gets called 1000 times opening a new connection every time. What is a better(faster) way to do this. Thank you!

share|improve this question
    
Even better: Collect all invoices and put them in an SQL IN Statement. This code is horrible performance-wise. –  flq Sep 15 '10 at 16:25
    
"This code is horrible performance-wise" --- your telling me! :) I thought about doing this, but wasn't sure if this was wise or but I may give it a shot. thanks –  twal Sep 15 '10 at 16:29
    
Do not ask for pointers. It might not be what You are looking for. :) –  Arnis L. Sep 15 '10 at 16:35

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Simply put all invoice nos in a IN statement and run this select statement in a single connection.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, my idea too. But there is a SP being used. –  Henk Holterman Sep 15 '10 at 16:32
    
thanks, this will work. I can edit the SP. This is the only method using it. –  twal Sep 15 '10 at 16:34
    
You can send all the id in one param, then make a split function that splits all the ids and returns a table of ids or use the more dirty "exec string" method –  Ivo Sep 15 '10 at 16:35

You can put your connection opening and closing code outside of your loop. That would make you only have one connection to the database. But that one connection would be open for a while. That's the trade-off. One connection open for a long time or lots of connections opening and closing.

I am also noticing that you are not closing your connection in the try code. Maybe try this.

public Invoice GetInvoice(string invoice)
{
      SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(//connection string);
      SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("dbo.getInvoices", con);
      cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
      cmd.Parameters.Add("invoice", SqlDbType.VarChar).Value = invoice;
      SqlDataReader dr;
      Invoice inv = new Invoice();
      try{
            con.Open();
            dr = cmd.ExecuteReader
            while(dr.read())
            {
                 //assign values from the database fields
            }
      }
      catch{}
      finally
      {
        con.Close();
      }
}
share|improve this answer
    
ok thanks I will give that a try and see if the results are any better. –  twal Sep 15 '10 at 16:23
    
oh sorry i just missed that in my post. I do have the finally with the con.close. Sorry forgot to copy and past that part..:) –  twal Sep 15 '10 at 16:26
    
You need to close your SqlDataReader too. –  tia Sep 15 '10 at 16:38
    
@tia: that would be a better practice but it will not make a real difference. The connection will close the reader, and vice versa. –  Henk Holterman Sep 15 '10 at 16:52

I'm missing the conn.Close() inside your try-block.

If it is really missing, that could be your problem: You keep making new connections all the time. So, close it, in a try/finally block.

But if this was a typo in the posted code, then I don't think your problem is related to the Connection(s), ADO.NET uses ConnectionPooling so you are keeping the 'real' connection open, even when you say conn.Close().

The other issue would be doing a Query for every invoice. That is expensive too. But since you seem to use a SP it's not so easy to overcome. What would be useful here is a SELECT statement that ends with WHERE Id IN (a, b, c, d). This would allow you to batch invoices (get 5 or 20 with 1 query.

share|improve this answer
    
the con.close() is there I just forgot to include it in my post. I have edit my original. Thanks for pointing that out. –  twal Sep 15 '10 at 16:28
    
@twal: I assumed as much. –  Henk Holterman Sep 15 '10 at 16:32

Something like this might be an improvement.

public List<Invoice> GetInvoices(List<string> invoiceList) {
  List<Invoice> invoices = new List<Invoice>();

  Invoice inv;
  SqlDataReader dr;

  using (SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(//connection string)) {
    using(SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("dbo.getInvoices", con)) {
      cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
      SqlParameter param = cmd.Parameters.Add("invoice", SqlDbType.VarChar);

      foreach(string i in invoiceList) {
        inv = new Invoice();
        param.Value = i;
        using (dr = cmd.ExecuteReader()) {
          while(dr.read())
          {
            // assign values from the database fields
            inv.Property = dr.GetString(0);

            // Add invoice to the result list
            invoices.Add(inv);
          }
        }
      }
    }
  }

  return invoices;
}

Then you can use this method like so...

var invoiceList = new List<string> { "123", "456", "789" };
var invoices = GetInvoices(invoiceList);
foreach(var i in invoices) {
  Console.WriteLine(i.SomeInvoiceProperty);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Didn't know that the PO had the ability to edit the StoredProc. Using an IN statement is 1000x better than my solution. –  jessegavin Sep 15 '10 at 16:40

I believe you may want to consider a different approach if you consistently are processing 700 to 1000 or more invoice numbers at one time why not send all the invoice numbers down in a single query instead of many individual query's. As an example you could use an sql in list to do this as in below.

select
 *
from
 ivoice_table
where
 invoice_table.invoice_number in (123,124,125,126,127,128 etc....)

Enjoy!

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