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I spend some time implementing a quicksort algorithm in C#. After finishing I compared the speed of my implementation and C#'s Array.Sort-Method.

I just compare speed working on random int arrays.

Here's my implementation:

static void QuickSort(int[] data, int left, int right)
{
    int i = left - 1,
        j = right;

    while (true)
    {
        int d = data[left];
        do i++; while (data[i] < d);
        do j--; while (data[j] > d);

        if (i < j) 
        {
            int tmp = data[i];
            data[i] = data[j];
            data[j] = tmp;
        }
        else
        {
            if (left < j)    QuickSort(data, left, j);
            if (++j < right) QuickSort(data, j, right);
            return;
        }
    }
}

Performance (when sorting an random int[] with length of 100000000):
   - my algorithm: 14.21 seconds
   - .Net Array<int>.Sort: 14.84 seconds

Does anyone know how to implement my algorithm even faster?
Or can anyone provide a faster implementation (need not be a quicksort!) which my run faster?

Note:
   - please no algorithms which use multiple cores/processors to improve perrformance
   - only valid C# source code

I will test the performance of the provided algorithms within a few minutes if I'm online.

EDIT:
Do you think using a ideal sorting network for parts containing less than 8 value would improve performance?

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4  
try repeating your timings when an array that is already sorted... Then with an array that only has two of the items in the wrong order.. –  Ian Ringrose Sep 15 '10 at 16:30
2  
A performance gain of 4.3% - Are you doing this for academic reasons? –  flq Sep 15 '10 at 16:30
    
kinda smells like homework to me –  Muad'Dib Sep 15 '10 at 16:33
2  
Ian is correct about the already sorted array. Your choice of a pivot element is going to have horrible worst-case performance. Having said that, speeding up Quicksort is fairly straightforward. Select a better pivot using something like the MedianOfThree method and use a more appropriate sorting algorithm for small partitions. I assume you are doing this for personal research because using the system-library sort method is almost always the right answer. –  Blastfurnace Sep 15 '10 at 16:42
3  
I just finished: when trying to sort an already sorted array my algorithm gets terribly slow. –  raisyn Sep 15 '10 at 17:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Does anyone know how to implement my algorithm even faster?

I was able to shave 10% off the execution time by converting your code to use pointers.

    public unsafe static void UnsafeQuickSort(int[] data)
    {
        fixed (int* pdata = data)
        {
            UnsafeQuickSortRecursive(pdata, 0, data.Length - 1);
        }
    }

    private unsafe static void UnsafeQuickSortRecursive(int* data, int left, int right)
    {
        int i = left - 1;
        int j = right;

        while (true)
        {
            int d = data[left];
            do i++; while (data[i] < d);
            do j--; while (data[j] > d);

            if (i < j)
            {
                int tmp = data[i];
                data[i] = data[j];
                data[j] = tmp;
            }
            else
            {
                if (left < j) UnsafeQuickSortRecursive(data, left, j);
                if (++j < right) UnsafeQuickSortRecursive(data, j, right);
                return;
            }
        }
    }
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there is a little bug, but really nice upgrade (+1), 1.1 seconds faster on my hardware! –  raisyn Sep 15 '10 at 17:20
5  
Doesn't this clash with the "safe" requirement in the title? –  Gabe Sep 15 '10 at 17:23
    
It's a bit difficult to say... this is simple enough too... I just wanted to be sure that I don't get any high optimized C/C++ codes. –  raisyn Sep 15 '10 at 17:33
    
@Gabe: I thought about that too before I posted. I was not really sure if "safe" was synonomous with "stable". But, considering that the quick sort is not stable that is probably a moot point anyway. I decided to go ahead and post anyway. –  Brian Gideon Sep 15 '10 at 17:58
1  
I would probably have the top level function either not have the left/right args or do some bounds checking before the call. –  Dolphin Sep 15 '10 at 18:17

Binary insertion sort almost always wins for short runs (~10 items). It's often better than an ideal sorting network because of the simplified branching structure.

Dual pivot quicksort is faster than quicksort. The linked paper contains a Java implementation that you could presumably adapt.

If you're only sorting integers, a radix sort will likely be faster still on long arrays.

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Take a look at Shear Sort and Odd-Event Transposition sort: http://www.cs.rit.edu/~atk/Java/Sorting/sorting.html and http://home.westman.wave.ca/~rhenry/sort/.

There's a C# implementation of Shear Sort here: http://www.codeproject.com/KB/recipes/cssorters.aspx.

The examples are in Java but that's awfully close to C#. They're parallel sorts because they run faster on multiple cores but still should be very fast.

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This first(and probably the second one) quick sort algorithm breaks when sorting arrays with duplicate items. I used this one, which works fine.

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