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I'm currently trying to wrap my head around learning Python and I've come to a bit of a stall on recursive functions. In Think Python, one of the exercises is to write a function that determines if number a is a power of number b using the following definition:

"A number, a, is a power of b if it is divisible by b and a/b is a power of b. Write a function called is_power that takes parameters a and b and returns True if a is a power of b."

The current state of my function is:

def isPower(a,b):
    return a % b == 0 and (a/b) % b == 0

print isPower(num1,num2)

As it is, this produces the result I expect. However the chapter is focused on writing recursive functions to reduce redundancy and I'm not quite sure how I can turn the final "(a/b) % b == 0" into a recursion. I've attempted:

def isPower(a,b):
    if a % b != 0:
        return False
    elif isPower((a/b),b):
        return True

But that just returns None.

What is the proper way to recurse this function?

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3  
you should beware that the meaning of the '/' operator has changed in Python 3+, from returning an integer to returning a float, so your code will break. Change it to '//' instead, which will always return an int. –  Dave Kirby Sep 15 '10 at 16:54
2  
note that your first attempt doesn't check if a is a power of b, it cheks if a is a multiple of b^2. try isPower(12,2), it would return True. –  Javier Sep 15 '10 at 16:56
    
Just so it's said, your first version of isPower is broken -- it will only show whether a is a multiple of b^2. It'll return true for isPower(2, 1), for example, which should never be true. For that matter, you may want to make sure any recursive version checks whether (b==1 && a!=1) before it continues, or it will either get stuck in an infinite loop or return the wrong thing. –  cHao Sep 15 '10 at 16:56

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are forgetting a base case, when a == 1:

def isPower(a,b):
    if a == 1:
        return True
    if a % b != 0:
        return False
    elif isPower((a/b),b):
        return True
    else
        return False

However this has some other problems - if a is 0 then it will never finish and if b is 0 then you will get a divide-by-zero.

Here is a verbose solution that as far as I can tell will work for all integer combinations:

def isPower(a,b):
    if a == 0 or b == 0:
        return False
    def realIsPower(a, b):
        if a == 1:
            return True
        elif a%b != 0:
            return False
        elif realIsPower((a/b), b):
            return True
        else:
            return False
    return realIsPower(a, b)

EDIT: My code didn't work for cases when both a and b are negative. I'm now comparing their absolute values.

EDIT2: Silly me, x^0 == 1, so a == 1 should ALWAYS return true. That also means I don't have to compare a to b before the recursion. Thanks @Javier.

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Thank you. This clarified exactly what I was missing. After tinkering around some more with it earlier I had reached a maximum recursion loop, but couldn't figure out how to stop it. I guess I assumed the interpreter would know I just wanted it to stop after performing itself once more. Now I understand that, when writing a recursive call, one of the tests to even allow that ELIF branch to be reached has to be able to stop it. This was just a practice function so allowing for a base of 1 would've been fine, but thanks for going all out to help! –  bobby Sep 15 '10 at 20:05
1  
Hey, glad I could help! Always remember that there are two things required for all recursive functions - a base case(s) and a recursive call. Sometimes (such as in this case) there is more than one base case. –  Niki Yoshiuchi Sep 15 '10 at 20:50

you need an additional case, for when both conditionals return false

def isPower(a,b):
    if a % b != 0:
        return False
    elif isPower((a/b),b):
        return True
    else
        return False
share|improve this answer
    
Such a simple fix. Thanks for the speedy reply! –  bobby Sep 15 '10 at 16:51
    
I think you meant a % b, not a & b –  Bob Sep 15 '10 at 17:10
    
This will always return false. –  Niki Yoshiuchi Sep 15 '10 at 17:24
    
You need to account for the base case too, actually. I just edited away the typo. –  Platinum Azure Sep 15 '10 at 17:47
    
this still does not work for me, at some point the function should return True in a non-recursive condition. –  tokland Sep 15 '10 at 19:05
def isPower (a,b):
    return a==1 or (a!=0 and b!=0 and b!=1 and isPower((a/b),b))
share|improve this answer
1  
I thought Python was supposed to be all about readability and avoiding redundancy? (-1 for that and lack of explanation) –  Platinum Azure Sep 15 '10 at 17:15
1  
Moreover abusing and/or short circuiting to squeeze everything in one line is not considered a good Python style. –  Adam Byrtek Sep 15 '10 at 17:23
2  
@Platinum Redundancy? Where do you get that? Readability - this is the best and most readable answer posted so far. +1. –  NealB Sep 15 '10 at 17:32
1  
@NealB: Are you high? How is this readable!? As for redundancy, you could say "b>1" instead of "b!=0 and b!=1", to name JUST ONE possible change. The rest of my complaints has to do with this being a one-liner that's just hard to read. –  Platinum Azure Sep 15 '10 at 17:44
1  
@Platinum Azure You can't say b > 1 because that rules out the case that b < 0. At best you could do b not in (0, 1). –  aaronasterling Sep 15 '10 at 18:38

Here is my code. From what I tested, it works:

def ispower(a, b):

    if b == 1 or b == 0:
        return False
    if b <= 0 or a <= 0:
        return False
    if a % b == 0:
        if ((a / b) / b) == 1:
            return True
        else:
            return ispower(a / b, b)
    else:
        return False
        print ispower(-10, 2)
share|improve this answer

try this,

def ispower(a,b):
  if b==a:
    return True
  elif a<b:
    return False
  else:
    return ispower(a*1.0/b, b)
share|improve this answer
    
an explanation would help this answer –  dove Nov 6 '12 at 8:13
def is_power (a, b):

    if a == 1:
        return True
    if a == 0 and b == 0:
        return True
    if a == 0 or b == 0:
        return False
    if a%b != 0:
        return False
    elif is_power ((a/b), b):
        return True
share|improve this answer

Here's my answer, it's a little bit cleaner:

def is_power(a, b):
    if a == 1:
        return True
    if a == 0 or b == 0:
        return False
    if a % b == 0 and is_power(a/b, b):
        return True
    else:
        return False
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