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I doubt I am the only one who has come up with this solution, but if you have a better one please post it here. I simply want to leave this question here so I and others can search it later.

I needed to tell whether a valid date had been entered into a text box and this is the code that I came up with. I fire this when focus leaves the text box.

try
{
    DateTime.Parse(startDateTextBox.Text);
}
catch
{
    startDateTextBox.Text = DateTime.Today.ToShortDateString();
}
share|improve this question
    
<sarcasm>judging by the answers, I think I should use TryParse</sarcasm> Thanks for the great answers guys. I had not even thought about TryParse – Matt Dec 16 '08 at 18:17
    
An example of an easy to google question that if someone asked today would be unfairly closed for having "not enough research". – 40-Love Jun 27 '13 at 20:39
1  
here is an easy way to do this without using any special functions :<stackoverflow.com/questions/14917203/…; – student Sep 11 '13 at 16:20
up vote 145 down vote accepted

DateTime.TryParse This I believe is faster and it means you dont have to use ugly try/catches :)

e.g

DateTime temp;
if(DateTime.TryParse(startDateTextBox.Text, out temp))
//yay
else
// :(
share|improve this answer
1  
You beat me to it ;) – Alex Fort Dec 16 '08 at 17:18
12  
Fastest gun in the west ;) – qui Dec 16 '08 at 17:19
    
Correct me if I'm wrong, but in C# (as opposed to, say, JavaScript) doesn't an if/else branch require curly braces? Don't getting me wrong, I'm not trying to scrutinize, it's a fantastic answer and I'm +1ing it because it helped me, but just thought since you never know how new future users are when viewing already posted answers, this could confuse them. Of course, if you're having trouble with curly braces in C#, this question would be the least of your worries... – VoidKing Dec 11 '13 at 21:21
1  
@VoidKing You are correct about the curly braces but if you only have 1 statement in that block you don't have to use them. This applies in some other languages as well but I can see how this can be misleading to newer coders. – D.Galvez Mar 11 '14 at 15:47
    
@D.Galvez Excuse my late coming to the party, but is it a best practice to include the brackets even if there is only 1 statement? This might just be a situation where personal preference is most important -- and in that case I find including them to be quite nice simply for readability and consistency. – Nicholas V. Apr 1 '14 at 19:49

Don't use exceptions for flow control. Use DateTime.TryParse and DateTime.TryParseExact. Personally I prefer TryParseExact with a specific format, but I guess there are times when TryParse is better. Example use based on your original code:

DateTime value;
if (!DateTime.TryParse(startDateTextBox.Text, out value))
{
    startDateTextox.Text = DateTime.Today.ToShortDateString();
}

Reasons for preferring this approach:

  • Clearer code (it says what it wants to do)
  • Better performance than catching and swallowing exceptions
  • This doesn't catch exceptions inappropriately - e.g. OutOfMemoryException, ThreadInterruptedException. (Your current code could be fixed to avoid this by just catching the relevant exception, but using TryParse would still be better.)
share|improve this answer

I would use the DateTime.TryParse() method: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.datetime.tryparse.aspx

share|improve this answer

Here's another variation of the solution that returns true if the string can be converted to a DateTime type, and false otherwise.

public static bool IsDateTime(string txtDate)
{
    DateTime tempDate;

    return DateTime.TryParse(txtDate, out tempDate) ? true : false;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Welcome to StackOverflow! Please look at the answers that have already been provided, especially when responding to a question that's over three years old and has been successfully answered. Your answer has already been covered by previous respondents. – Bob Kaufman Jul 2 '12 at 21:26

What about using TryParse?

share|improve this answer

A problem with using DateTime.TryParse is that it doesn't support the very common data-entry use case of dates entered without separators, e.g. 011508.

Here's an example of how to support this. (This is from a framework I'm building, so its signature is a little weird, but the core logic should be usable):

    private static readonly Regex ShortDate = new Regex(@"^\d{6}$");
    private static readonly Regex LongDate = new Regex(@"^\d{8}$");

    public object Parse(object value, out string message)
    {
        msg = null;
        string s = value.ToString().Trim();
        if (s.Trim() == "")
        {
            return null;
        }
        else
        {
            if (ShortDate.Match(s).Success)
            {
                s = s.Substring(0, 2) + "/" + s.Substring(2, 2) + "/" + s.Substring(4, 2);
            }
            if (LongDate.Match(s).Success)
            {
                s = s.Substring(0, 2) + "/" + s.Substring(2, 2) + "/" + s.Substring(4, 4);
            }
            DateTime d = DateTime.MinValue;
            if (DateTime.TryParse(s, out d))
            {
                return d;
            }
            else
            {
                message = String.Format("\"{0}\" is not a valid date.", s);
                return null;
            }
        }

    }
share|improve this answer
    
I am not worried about seporators in my case because I am using a Masked Text Box, but I can see how that would be handy in other situations I may encounter with this app. – Matt Dec 16 '08 at 21:20
    
It helped me a lot. I deeply thanks for your input. – Nano HE Aug 15 '11 at 8:31
    protected bool ValidateBirthday(String date)
    {
        DateTime Temp;

        if (DateTime.TryParse(date, out Temp) == true &&
      Temp.Hour == 0 &&
      Temp.Minute == 0 &&
      Temp.Second == 0 &&
      Temp.Millisecond == 0 &&
      Temp > DateTime.MinValue)
            return true;
        else
            return false;
    }

//suppose that input string is short date format.
e.g. "2013/7/5" returns true or
"2013/2/31" returns false.
http://forums.asp.net/t/1250332.aspx/1
//bool booleanValue = ValidateBirthday("12:55"); returns false

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private void btnEnter_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    maskedTextBox1.Mask = "00/00/0000";
    maskedTextBox1.ValidatingType = typeof(System.DateTime);
    //if (!IsValidDOB(maskedTextBox1.Text)) 
    if (!ValidateBirthday(maskedTextBox1.Text))
        MessageBox.Show(" Not Valid");
    else
        MessageBox.Show("Valid");
}
// check date format dd/mm/yyyy. but not if year < 1 or > 2013.
public static bool IsValidDOB(string dob)
{ 
    DateTime temp;
    if (DateTime.TryParse(dob, out temp))
        return (true);
    else 
        return (false);
}
// checks date format dd/mm/yyyy and year > 1900!.
protected bool ValidateBirthday(String date)
{
    DateTime Temp;
    if (DateTime.TryParse(date, out Temp) == true &&
        Temp.Year > 1900 &&
       // Temp.Hour == 0 && Temp.Minute == 0 &&
        //Temp.Second == 0 && Temp.Millisecond == 0 &&
        Temp > DateTime.MinValue)
        return (true);
    else
        return (false);
}
share|improve this answer

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