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If I'm looking for nested nodes of a parent, I'd query for children like this:

parent.left < child.left

This is always true though:

child.right < parent.right

So why do all examples I've found run a between query?

thanks, Matt

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This isn't really clear. Shouldn't the query for child nodes be something like child.parent = parent.id? Or are you trying to query for nodes in a sorted balanced binary tree of some kind? If the latter, shouldn't the node be categorized by child.left < parent.left and child.right < parent.right OR child.right > parent.right and child.left > parent.left? Not that that's going to get you the tree the way you expect, but it at least makes sense. – Mike Burton Sep 15 '10 at 17:25
    
Are asking about nested sets? – Daniel Vandersluis Sep 15 '10 at 17:28
    
I've seen them named as nested sets, nests trees (mysql website), adjacency lists. What's the proper term? – mna Sep 15 '10 at 17:31
    
Adjacency lists and nested sets are different concepts. Adjacency lists link records to their parents. Nested sets can contain a parent ID column but have left and right columns in order to determine what elements are descendants. See dev.mysql.com/tech-resources/articles/hierarchical-data.html – Daniel Vandersluis Sep 15 '10 at 17:35
    
I'm talking about nested sets then. – mna Sep 15 '10 at 17:37
up vote 0 down vote accepted

In a nested set, the hierarchy is described by specifying the left and right boundaries of each node, and all descendant nodes fall within those boundaries. Let's say your hierarchy looks like

A
 - B
 - C
    - D
    - E
 - F
 - G
H
I
 - J

When each row is added to your nested set, you'd end up with a table that looks like:

+----+--------+-----+-----+-----------+
| id | value  | lft | rgt | parent_id |
+----+--------+-----+-----+-----------+
|  1 | A      |   1 |  14 |      NULL |
|  2 | B      |   2 |   3 |         1 |
|  3 | C      |   4 |   9 |         1 |
|  4 | D      |   5 |   6 |         3 |
|  5 | E      |   7 |   8 |         3 |
|  6 | F      |  10 |  11 |         1 |
|  7 | G      |  12 |  13 |         1 |
|  8 | H      |  15 |  16 |      NULL |
|  9 | I      |  17 |  20 |      NULL |
| 10 | J      |  18 |  19 |         9 |
+----+--------+-----+-----+-----------+

Or to look at it another way:

        -D- -E-
  -B- -----C----- --F-- --G--             --J--
---------------A---------------- --H-- -----I-----
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

When you want to query for all descendants of a node (let's say A), you'd query like so:

SELECT *
FROM table AS node
JOIN table AS parent
  ON parent.id = 1
WHERE node.lft BETWEEN parent.lft AND parent.rgt -- BETWEEN 1 AND 14
ORDER BY lft

Since every node's left boundary has to be less than its right boundary, you don't need to check the node's right boundary, but just search for nodes that fall within the parent's boundaries (therefore the right boundary is only needed to determine where the end of the set is). If, for example, you were trying to get the descendants of node C, and only checked against C's left boundary, the query would return nodes that are siblings (F and G), and unrelated (H, I and J) to C.

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I believe it is only always true for Binary Search Trees (BST), not necessarily all Binary Trees.

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If you are talking about the Nested Set Model, then you are incorrect: parent.left < child.left and child.right < parent.right.

So, you can get all of a node's children by querying for node IDs between its left and right IDs.

See Celko's second query in this link:

SELECT P2.*
FROM Personnel AS P1, Personnel AS P2
WHERE P1.lft BETWEEN P2.lft AND P2.rgt
AND P2.emp = :myemployee;
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yes I mixed the signs up. Edited the post – mna Sep 15 '10 at 17:32
    
@mna: Your post is still wrong. See my answer. – RedFilter Sep 15 '10 at 17:37
    
ok got it. If other parents exist then Parent.left<child.left would select a lot more nodes... duh. – mna Sep 15 '10 at 17:46
    
surely this is the nested sets model, not the adjacency list model. – onedaywhen Sep 15 '10 at 20:26
    
@onedaywhen: Yes! Corrected... – RedFilter Sep 15 '10 at 20:50

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