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I have two classes: a base class (Animal) and a class deriving from it (Cat).Base class contains one virtual method Play that takes List as input parameter.Something like this

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace ConsoleApplication9
{
    class Animal
    {
        public virtual void Play(List<Animal> animal) { }
    }
    class Cat : Animal
    {
        public override void Play(List<Animal> animal)
        {
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Cat cat = new Cat();
            cat.Play(new List<Cat>());
        }
    }
}

When i compile the above program,i get the following error

    Error    2    Argument 1: cannot convert from 'System.Collections.Generic.List' to 'System.Collections.Generic.List'

Is there anyway to accomplish this?

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3  
possible duplicate of Casting a generic collection to base type –  finnw Sep 15 '10 at 18:52
1  
First thing to do is change the List<> argument to an IEnumerable<> argument. –  Joel Coehoorn Sep 15 '10 at 19:04
    

5 Answers 5

up vote 26 down vote accepted

The reason you cannot do this is because a list is writable. Suppose it were legal, and see what goes wrong:

List<Cat> cats = new List<Cat>();
List<Animal> animals = cats; // Trouble brewing...
animals.Add(new Dog()); // hey, we just added a dog to a list of cats...
cats[0].Speak(); // Woof!

Well dog my cats, that is badness.

The feature you want is called "generic covariance" and it is supported in C# 4 for interfaces that are known to be safe. IEnumerable<T> does not have any way to write to the sequence, so it is safe.

class Animal    
{    
    public virtual void Play(IEnumerable<Animal> animals) { }    
}    
class Cat : Animal    
{    
    public override void Play(IEnumerable<Animal> animals) { }    
}    
class Program    
{    
    static void Main()    
    {    
        Cat cat = new Cat();    
        cat.Play(new List<Cat>());    
    }    
}  

That will work in C# 4 because List<Cat> is convertible to IEnumerable<Cat>, which is convertible to IEnumerable<Animal>. There is no way that Play can use IEnumerable<Animal> to add a dog to something that is actually a list of cats.

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I'm missing how having Play being a member of Animal adds to the explanation. That is, Play taking an IEnumerable<Animal>. IMO it would be clearer if it just was Play() and the example was placed in void Main() using assignment. –  Dykam Sep 17 '10 at 17:07
    
@Dykam: It does not. I was attempting to follow the code structure laid out by the original poster. –  Eric Lippert Sep 17 '10 at 18:08
    
Ah, I see. For some reason I didn't link the two snippets. –  Dykam Sep 18 '10 at 15:41

You're looking for generic collection covariance. Obviously, though, that feature is not supported by the version of C# that you're using.

You can work around it by using the Cast<T>() extension method. Be aware, though, that this will create a copy of your original list instead of passing the original as a different type:

cat.Play((new List<Cat>()).Cast<Animal>().ToList());
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It is not supported by List at all, as it is an in&out generic. –  Dykam Sep 15 '10 at 19:02
    
@Dykam - Can you ellaborate please? The comment doesn't make much sense as is. –  Justin Niessner Sep 15 '10 at 19:13
    
Well, as List both takes input, as well returns output, co- and contravariance is not possible. If you would be able do List<Animal> list = new List<Dog>(); The following would crash the application: list.Add(new Elephant());. –  Dykam Sep 15 '10 at 20:54

You could do a few things. One example is cast the elements of the list to Animal

Using your code:

cat.Play(new List<Cat>().Cast<Animal>().ToList());

Another is to make Animal generic, so cat.Play(new List<Cat>()); would work.

class Animal<T>
{
    public virtual void Play(List<T> animals) { }
}
class Cat : Animal<Cat>
{
    public override void Play(List<Cat> cats)
    {
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Cat cat = new Cat();
        cat.Play(new List<Cat>());
    }
}

One other method is to not make Animal generic, but the Play method and constrain that to T : Animal

class Animal
{
    public virtual void Play<T>(List<T> animals) where T : Animal { }
}
class Cat : Animal
{
    public override void Play<T>(List<T> animals) 
    {
    }
}

Finally, if you are on C# 4 and only need to enumerate over the list and not modify it, check Eric Lippert's answer on IEnumerable<Animal>.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the generic trick –  Scott Chamberlain Sep 15 '10 at 19:00
    
Also +1 for pointing out that you should probably use IEnumerable for the parameter type rather than List –  Joel Coehoorn Sep 15 '10 at 19:05
    
I don't understand that last bit; why does the class Cat have a method with a type parameter named Cat? Isn't that extremely confusing, to have two types with the same name inside the same declaration? –  Eric Lippert Sep 15 '10 at 21:38
    
@Eric, I was just being dumb. –  Anthony Pegram Sep 15 '10 at 23:33
1  
Well, that about settles it. I'm becoming a plumber. –  Anthony Pegram Sep 16 '10 at 0:05

use the extension method Cast()

so:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Cat cat = new Cat();
        cat.Play(new List<Cat>().Cast<Animal>());
    }
}

The reason for this is b/c .net 3.5 does not support covariance, but 4.0 does :)

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The reason is off. cat.Play(new List<Cat>()); would also not work in 4 with the existing code. –  Anthony Pegram Sep 15 '10 at 19:05

Everyone mentions the cast method already. If you can not update to 4.0 a way to hide the cast is

class Cat : Animal
{
    public override void Play(List<Animal> animal)
    {
         Play((List<Cat>)animal);
    }
    public virtual void Play(List<Cat> animal)
    {
    }
}

This is the same trick IEnumable and IEnumarable<T> play for GetEnumerator

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