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I'm toying around with writing compilers and learning about the theory behind syntax analysis. I've found that even though it's a key concept for understanding recognition algorithms, information about it on the net is fairly poor. It seems StackOverflow is in a unique position to fix this problem.

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The simple answer is, "the set of tokens that you expect next in some context". –  Ira Baxter Dec 5 '12 at 20:45

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

Briefly: The lookahead set for a non-terminal X in a context-free grammar X -> A | B | C is the set of terminals that X can begin producing, i.e. the union of the possible first terminals of X'es productions.

For example, in the following grammar,

T ->    int
T ->    bool
T ->    T * T
T ->    T -> T
T ->    (T)

the first possible terminals of T are {int, bool, (}. The other terminals of this grammar are *, -> and ), but these cannot be the first terminals in any production for T.

When referring to the lookahead sets (plural) for an entire grammar, one means to find one set for each non-terminal based on all the productions for that terminal. In the above example there is only one non-terminal T, and so there is only one lookahead set to calculate.

Informal method

For small grammars, finding the lookahead set of non-terminals in a grammar is achieved straight-forwardly by looking at the productions and seeing what comes first and following non-terminals if they come first. Doing this, informally, for the grammar above, could result in this train of thought:

For the first two productions, int and bool are concluded to be in the set. For the third production, since it begins with T, whatever terminals in the lookahead set for T must also be in the lookahead set for T, and since we haven't concluded that T can derive nothing, * is probably not in the lookahead set. The same can be said for the fourth production.

In the last production, ( is concluded to be in the set. Since none of these productions produced nothing, * and -> are certainly not in the lookahead set.

Formal method

For a formal method, which is necessary when encoding the calculation of lookahead sets into a computer program, one can define more rigorously what is meant by "first terminals of X'es productions". This calculation typically makes use of the function NULLABLE, and the sets FIRST and FOLLOW. These are defined, among other places, in Torben Mogensen's free book, Basics of Compiler Design:

(Greek letter abuse: ε, epsilon, is the empty string.)

Definition: NULLABLE(X) is true if X can derive ε. Or:

NULLABLE(ε) = true
NULLABLE(x) = false, if x is a terminal
NULLABLE(αβ) = NULLABLE(α) and NULLABLE(β)
NULLABLE(P) = NULLABLE(α_1) or NULLABLE(α_2) or ... or NULLABLE(α_n),
               if P is a non-terminal and the right-hand-sides
               of all its productions are α_1, α_2, ..., α_n.

For example, NULLABLE(T) is false because all T's productions produce something:

NULLABLE(T) = NULLABLE(int) or
              NULLABLE(bool) or
              NULLABLE(T * T) or
              NULLABLE(T -> T) or
              NULLABLE( '(' T ')' )
            = false or
              false or
              (NULLABLE(T) and NULLABLE(* T)) or
              (NULLABLE(T) and NULLABLE(-> T)) or
              (NULLABLE('(') and NULLABLE( T ')' ))
            = false or
              false or
              (NULLABLE(T) and NULLABLE(*) and NULLABLE(T)) or
              (NULLABLE(T) and NULLABLE(->) and NULLABLE(T)) or
              (NULLABLE('(') and NULLABLE(T) and NULLABLE(')'))
            = false or
              false or
              (NULLABLE(T) and false and NULLABLE(T)) or
              (NULLABLE(T) and false and NULLABLE(T)) or
              (false and NULLABLE(T) and false)
            = false or false or false or false or false
            = false

Definition: FIRST(X) is the set of terminals that any production for the non-terminal X can begin with. Or:

FIRST(ε) = Ø
FIRST(x) = {x}, assuming x is a terminal
FIRST(αβ) = FIRST(α) U FIRST(β), if NULLABLE(α)
          = FIRST(α), if not NULLABLE(α)
FIRST(P) = FIRST(α_1) U FIRST(α_2) U ... U FIRST(α_n),
               if P is a non-terminal and the right-hand-sides
               of all its productions are α_1, α_2, ..., α_n.

For example, using the above grammar, FIRST(T) = {int, bool, (}:

FIRST(T) = FIRST(int) U
           FIRST(bool) U
           FIRST(T * T) U
           FIRST(T -> T) U
           FIRST( '(' T ')' )
         = {int} U        since int is terminal
           {bool} U       since bool is terminal
           FIRST(T) U     since T is not nullable
           FIRST(T) U     since T is not nullable
           FIRST('(')     since '(' is not nullable
         = {int, bool} U FIRST(T) U {(}
         = {int, bool, (}

With many non-terminals, one may end up with constraints that are less trivial than FIRST(T) ⊂ FIRST(T).

FIRST(T) his is incidentally the same as LOOKAHEAD(T), but only because NULLABLE(T) is false and because there are no other productions that use T. This will make sense once we define FOLLOW, so we can really define LOOKAHEAD in terms of all three.

For the FOLLOW set I want to refer to Torben's book ch. 3.10:

Definition 3.6 A terminal symbol a is in FOLLOW(N) if and only if there is a derivation from the start symbol S of the grammar such that S ⇒ αN aβ, where α and β are (possibly empty) sequences of grammar symbols.

To interpret this using other words: When calculating FOLLOW(N) for a non-terminal N, the terminal a is in FOLLOW(N) if the sequence N a exists somewhere in the grammar. There are several resources available on calculating FOLLOW sets. Torben's book uses a fixpoint algorithm.

Once these three concepts are understood, we can define the lookahead set for a single production X -> α:

LOOKAHEAD(X -> α) = FIRST(α) U FOLLOW(X), if NULLABLE(α)
LOOKAHEAD(X -> α) = FIRST(α), if not NULLABLE(α)

And we can define the lookahead set for a non-terminal X with productions X -> A, X -> B and X -> C by taking the union of the lookahead sets for each production.

LOOKAHEAD(X) = LOOKAHEAD(X -> A) U LOOKAHEAD(X -> B) U LOOKAHEAD(X -> C)
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