Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm toying around with writing compilers and learning about the theory behind syntax analysis. I've found that even though it's a key concept for understanding recognition algorithms, information about it on the net is fairly poor. It seems StackOverflow is in a unique position to fix this problem.

share|improve this question
3  
The simple answer is, "the set of tokens that you expect next in some context". – Ira Baxter Dec 5 '12 at 20:45
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The lookahead sets for a grammar is defined in terms of the lookahead sets for each of its non-terminals, which in turn rely on the lookahead set for each production. Determining lookahead sets can help us determine if a grammar is LL(1), and if it is, what information we need to construct a recursive-descent parser for it.

Definition: LOOKAHEAD(X -> α) and LOOKAHEAD(X):

LOOKAHEAD(X -> α) = FIRST(α) U FOLLOW(X), if NULLABLE(α)
LOOKAHEAD(X -> α) = FIRST(α), if not NULLABLE(α)
LOOKAHEAD(X) = LOOKAHEAD(X -> α) U LOOKAHEAD(X -> β) U LOOKAHEAD(X -> γ)

where FIRST(α) is the set of terminals that α can begin with, FOLLOW(X) is the set of terminals that can come after an X anywhere in the grammar, and NULLABLE(α) is whether α can derive an empty sequence of terminals (denoted ε). The following definitions are taken from Torben Mogensen's free book, Basics of Compiler Design. See below for an example.

Definition: NULLABLE(X):

NULLABLE(ε) = true
NULLABLE(x) = false, if x is a terminal
NULLABLE(αβ) = NULLABLE(α) and NULLABLE(β)
NULLABLE(P) = NULLABLE(α_1) or NULLABLE(α_2) or ... or NULLABLE(α_n),
               if P is a non-terminal and the right-hand-sides
               of all its productions are α_1, α_2, ..., α_n.

Definition: FIRST(X):

FIRST(ε) = Ø
FIRST(x) = {x}, assuming x is a terminal
FIRST(αβ) = FIRST(α) U FIRST(β), if NULLABLE(α)
          = FIRST(α), if not NULLABLE(α)
FIRST(P) = FIRST(α_1) U FIRST(α_2) U ... U FIRST(α_n),
               if P is a non-terminal and the right-hand-sides
               of all its productions are α_1, α_2, ..., α_n.

Definition: FOLLOW(X):

A terminal symbol a is in FOLLOW(X) if and only if there is a derivation from the start symbol S of the grammar such that S ⇒ αX aβ, where α and β are (possibly empty) sequences of grammar symbols. (See the method for determining FOLLOW(X) in Torben's book.)

An example:

E -> n A
A -> E B
A -> ε
B -> + A
B -> * A

First, NULLABLE and FIRST and are determined:

NULLABLE(E) = NULLABLE(n A) = NULLABLE(n) ∧ NULLABLE(A) = false
NULLABLE(A) = NULLABLE(E B) ∨ NULLABLE(ε) = true
NULLABLE(B) = NULLABLE(+ A) ∨ NULLABLE(* A) = false

FIRST(E) = FIRST(n A) = {n}
FIRST(A) = FIRST(E B) U FIRST(ε) = FIRST(E) U Ø = {n} (because E is not NULLABLE)
FIRST(B) = FIRST(+ A) U FIRST(* A) = FIRST(+) U FIRST(*) = {+, *}

Before FOLLOW is determined, the production E' -> E $ is added, where $ is considered the "end-of-file" non-terminal. Then FOLLOW is determined:

FOLLOW(E): Set β = $, so add the constraint that FIRST($) = {$} ⊆ FOLLOW(E)
           Set β = B, so add the constraint that FIRST(B) = {+, *} ⊆ FOLLOW(E)
FOLLOW(A): Set β = ε, so add the constraint that FIRST(ε) = Ø ⊆ FOLLOW(A).
           Because NULLABLE(ε), add the constraint that FOLLOW(E) ⊆ FOLLOW(A).
           Set β = ε, so add the constraint that FIRST(ε) = Ø ⊆ FOLLOW(A).
           Because NULLABLE(ε), add the constraint that FOLLOW(B) ⊆ FOLLOW(A).
           Set β = ε, so add the constraint that FIRST(ε) = Ø ⊆ FOLLOW(A).
           Because NULLABLE(ε), add the constraint that FOLLOW(B) ⊆ FOLLOW(A).
FOLLOW(B): Set β = ε, so add the constraint that FIRST(ε) = Ø ⊆ FOLLOW(B).
           Because NULLABLE(ε), add the constraint that FOLLOW(A) ⊆ FOLLOW(B).

Resolving these constraints (could also be achieved by fixed-point iteration),

    {+, *, $} ⊆ FOLLOW(E)
    FOLLOW(E) ⊆ FOLLOW(A)
    FOLLOW(A) = FOLLOW(B)

    FOLLOW(E) = FOLLOW(A) = FOLLOW(B) = {+, *, $}.

Now LOOKAHEAD for each production can be determined:

LOOKAHEAD(E -> n A) = FIRST(n A) = {n}     because ¬NULLABLE(n A)
LOOKAHEAD(A -> E B) = FIRST(E B)           because ¬NULLABLE(E B)
                    = FIRST(E) = {n}       because ¬NULLABLE(E)
LOOKAHEAD(A -> ε)   = FIRST(ε) U FOLLOW(A) because NULLABLE(ε)
                    = Ø U {+, *, $} = {+, *, $}
LOOKAHEAD(B -> + A) = FIRST(+ A)           because ¬NULLABLE(+ A)
                    = FIRST(+) = {+}       because ¬NULLABLE(+)
LOOKAHEAD(B -> * A) = {*}                  for the same reason

Finally, LOOKAHEAD for each non-terminal can be determined:

LOOKAHEAD(E) = LOOKAHEAD(E -> n A) = {n}
LOOKAHEAD(A) = LOOKAHEAD(A -> E B) U LOOKAHEAD(A -> ε)   = {n} U {+, *, $}
LOOKAHEAD(B) = LOOKAHEAD(B -> + A) U LOOKAHEAD(B -> * A) = {+, *}

By this knowledge we can determine that this grammar is not LL(1) because its non-terminals have overlapping lookahead sets.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.