Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a windows service that writes out log file entries to an XML log file. I maintain a handle to the log file while the service is operational, and close, flush and dispose of it when the service is stopped. The file write operations are by the service only, and I have the filestream open in FileAccess.ReadWrite while sharing is set to FileShare.Read. I would like to be able to open and view this file with an XmlRead() call by another application, but I get an error stating the file is being used by another process. I had read another post on this and was under the impression this was possible: Other Thread.

The writer in use is flushed, closed, and disposed of, and each write the filestream is flushed. Is this just not possible in .Net, or have I perhaps done something wrong? A cutdown version of the code follows:

if (_logFS == null)
        _logFS = new FileStream(_fileName, FileMode.OpenOrCreate, FileAccess.ReadWrite, FileShare.Read);

if (!initFile)
{
    _logFS.Seek(-13, SeekOrigin.End);
}

XmlWriterSettings settings = new XmlWriterSettings();
settings.Indent = true;
settings.OmitXmlDeclaration = true;
using (XmlWriter writer = XmlWriter.Create(_logFS, settings))
{
    if (initFile)
    {
        writer.WriteRaw("<?xml version=\"1.0\" encoding=\"utf-8\" standalone=\"yes\"?>\n");
        writer.WriteStartElement("Entries", "http://www.abcdefg.com);
    }

    writer.WriteStartElement("Exception");
    // write out some stuff here.
    writer.WriteEndElement();


    writer.Flush();
    writer.Close();
}

_logFS.Flush();

The file opening code is now as follows:

_LogDS = new XmlLogFile();
using (FileStream logFS = new FileStream(_fileName, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read)
{
    _LogDS.ReadXml(logFS);
}
share|improve this question
    
I have also noticed that while the service is running, that I can open and view the file in Notepad++. Is it possible when I try to load the file via DataSet.XmlRead() that it is trying to get an exclusive lock in my other code? –  codewright Sep 15 '10 at 19:44
    
Typo'ed my last comment, I meant DataSet.ReadXml(). –  codewright Sep 15 '10 at 19:58
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You also need to close the FileStream. At a minimum, you need to close it when your service exits, or when the FileStream would go out of the application's scope.

You should be able to open it as ReadOnly from another application either way, but you have to specify that, it's not a default.

In your service you need to enable the file sharing:

FileStream fs = new FileStream("path", FileMode.OpenOrCreate, FileAccess.ReadWrite, FileShare.Read);

And in your reader application:

FileStream fs = new FileStream("path", FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.ReadWrite);

Without the FileShare.Read, all requests to open the file for reading fail. Any other application requesting to open the file for writing will still fail, for write-enabled sharing you'd use FileShare.ReadWrite. The default option for FileShare is None.

share|improve this answer
    
I thought the idea was to keep the filestream open in the service, so I didn't have to continue to reopen it. –  codewright Sep 15 '10 at 19:30
    
Will you provide the code you are using to access the stream from your other application. –  AndHeCodedIt Sep 15 '10 at 19:42
    
Done, for both the service and the reader application. –  Nathan Wheeler Sep 15 '10 at 19:48
2  
Make sure you're opening it for read only from your viewer application then. If that's not it, then please post the code you're using to open the file in your viewer, especially if other applications (Notepad++) can open the file. –  Nathan Wheeler Sep 15 '10 at 21:34
1  
Try adding a FileShare.ReadWrite to your viewer application as I've indicated in my post. I can't recall ever having to do that before, but it's been a while... –  Nathan Wheeler Sep 15 '10 at 22:00
show 4 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.