Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I had some time and decided to implement a one time pad just for fun and self education. Now I end up with a weird behavior of the data. Its driving me crazy ^^. Would you please help me? Thanks in advance.

There is an encrypt method which takes as arguements:

  • an InputStream for the plain text
  • an OutputStreams for the cipher text
  • and an OutputStreams for the key.

There is an decrypt method which takes as arguements:

  • an InputStream for the cipher text
  • an InputStream for the key
  • an OutputStreams for the plain text.

There is a main method to test and debug the code. Here is the class:

import java.io.ByteArrayInputStream;
 import java.io.ByteArrayOutputStream;
 import java.io.IOException;
 import java.io.InputStream;
 import java.io.OutputStream;
 import java.security.SecureRandom;

 public class MyPad {

  public static void encrypt(InputStream plainTextInputStream, OutputStream cipherTextOutputStream, OutputStream keyOutputStream) {
   int plainTextByte;
   SecureRandom random = new SecureRandom(); 
   System.out.println("plain\tkey\tcipher");
   try {
    while((plainTextByte = plainTextInputStream.read()) != -1){
     int keyByte = random.nextInt(256);
     int cipherTextByte = (plainTextByte + keyByte) % 256;
     System.out.println(plainTextByte + "\t" + keyByte + "\t" + cipherTextByte);
     cipherTextOutputStream.write(cipherTextByte);
     keyOutputStream.write(keyByte);
    }
    plainTextInputStream.close();
    cipherTextOutputStream.close();
    keyOutputStream.close();
   } catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
   }
  }

  public static void decrypt(InputStream cipherTextInputStream, InputStream keyInputStream, OutputStream plainTextOutputStream) {
   int cipherTextByte;
   System.out.println("plain\tkey\tcipher");
   try {
    while((cipherTextByte = cipherTextInputStream.read()) != -1){
     int keyByte = keyInputStream.read();
     int plainTextByte = Math.abs(cipherTextByte - keyByte) % 256;
     System.out.println(plainTextByte + "\t" + keyByte + "\t" + cipherTextByte);
     plainTextOutputStream.write(plainTextByte);
    }
    cipherTextInputStream.close();
    keyInputStream.close();
    plainTextOutputStream.close();
   } catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
   }
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
   String plainText = "This is my plain text.";
   InputStream plainTextInputStream = new ByteArrayInputStream(plainText.getBytes());
   ByteArrayOutputStream cipherTextOutputStream = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
   ByteArrayOutputStream keyOutputStream = new ByteArrayOutputStream();

   System.out.println("------------------------------------ encrypting");
   encrypt(plainTextInputStream, cipherTextOutputStream, keyOutputStream);

   String cipherText = cipherTextOutputStream.toString();
   String key = keyOutputStream.toString();
   System.out.println("plaintext:\t" + plainText);
   System.out.println("ciphertext:\t" + cipherText);
   System.out.println("key:\t" + key);
   InputStream cipherTextInputStream = new ByteArrayInputStream(cipherText.getBytes());
   InputStream keyInputStream = new ByteArrayInputStream(key.getBytes());
   ByteArrayOutputStream plainTextOutputStream = new ByteArrayOutputStream();

   System.out.println("------------------------------------ decrypting");
   decrypt(cipherTextInputStream, keyInputStream, plainTextOutputStream);

   plainText = plainTextOutputStream.toString();
   System.out.println("plaintext:\t" + plainText);
  }

 }

Now here is the problem I have. I encrypt a plain text and decrypt it immediatley, but the encrypted plain text is not the same as the original. I made some ouput for debugging and it seems like, the data I wrote during encryption is not the same data I read during decryption. Look at the output yourself:

 ------------------------------------ encrypting
 plain key cipher
 84 25 109
 104 239 87
 105 86 191
 115 74 189
 32 100 132
 105 17 122
 115 211 70
 32 147 179
 109 104 213
 121 118 239
 32 139 171
 112 244 100
 108 196 48
 97 181 22
 105 226 75
 110 94 204
 32 156 188
 116 92 208
 101 91 192
 120 165 29
 116 177 37
 46 49 95
 plaintext: This is my plain text.
 ciphertext: mW���zF���d0K̼��%_
 key: �VJdӓhv��ĵ�^�\[��1
 ------------------------------------ decrypting
 plain key cipher
 84 25 109
 152 239 87
 48 191 239
 2 189 191
 103 86 189
 165 74 239
 91 100 191
 172 17 189
 28 211 239
 44 147 191
 85 104 189
 4 118 122
 169 239 70
 48 191 239
 2 189 191
 50 239 189
 48 191 239
 2 189 191
 7 196 189
 58 181 239
 48 239 191
 2 191 189
 89 189 100
 46 94 48
 217 239 22
 116 191 75
 15 189 204
 96 92 188
 148 91 239
 48 239 191
 2 191 189
 50 189 239
 48 239 191
 2 191 189
 160 189 29
 12 49 37
 96 -1 95
 plaintext: T�0g�[�,U�020:0Y.�t`�020�`

This looks really weird to me. Any suggestions where that difference is coming from?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
I'm not 100% sure but I'm guessing some kind of character encoding mismatch between input and output...? –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Sep 15 '10 at 20:39
    
@Frustrated: That sounds likely. I do want to point out that, because it relies on a low-quality PRNG, this is not at all secure. A OTP is no better than its key. –  Steven Sudit Sep 15 '10 at 20:43
2  
Also, a true OTP has a key size that is the same as the message size. This is why properly implemented OTP encryption is not vulnerable to cryptanalysis. The security of this cipher depends on the particular SecureRandom that is selected by the platform. If it's a PRNG then the key size is the size of the key used by the PRN algorithm. If it's a real physical random source, then it's a real OTP. –  Geoff Reedy Sep 15 '10 at 21:10
    
@Geoff: Yes, the whole point is that there has to be nothing in the key that can be analyzed: it must be as random as possible. The method above is not even cryptographically random. –  Steven Sudit Sep 15 '10 at 21:23
1  
@Steven It is 'cryptographically random' - that's what a SecureRandom is supposed to produce. It's not a good cipher, or an OTP, though. –  Nick Johnson Sep 15 '10 at 21:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are two problems:

  1. You use String#getBytes to get the bytes to feed back in. This means that they went through a round of string decoding and encoding. Notice that the sequence of key bytes is not the same on encryption and decryption. You should instead use ByteArrayOutputStream#toByteArray
  2. Math.abs(cipherTextByte - keyByte) % 256 is wrong. (0 - 1) (mod 256) = 255 not 1. You should instead use (256 + cipherTextByte - keyByte) % 256
share|improve this answer
    
The value of ((0-1) mod 256) depends on the language's definition of "mod". It could be 255 or -1, or possibly another (consistent but different) value. In java, i'm pretty sure the result is -1. –  cHao Sep 15 '10 at 21:10
    
@cHao, I'm speaking stricty mathematically which is why I used the (mod 256) notation (see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modular_arithmetic). It is true there are languages where -1 % 256 == 255, but Java is not one of them. In java % really computes the remainder of truncated division. –  Geoff Reedy Sep 15 '10 at 21:40
    
Thx. I had two use both. I now use toByteArray() to send the data from one stream to another and your math code. I'll think about the math code tomorow. Any suggestions to make it more secure. Should I use an other provider for RNG? –  PageFault Sep 15 '10 at 21:56

Instead of adding and subtracting and then %256'ing, you could use an xor. That'd accomplish the same task with less mathematical oddity. a ^ b doesn't care about signs or remainders or any of that junk, never falls outside the bounds of its arguments (byte1 ^ byte2 will always be byte-sized), and it's easily reversible.

As for why you're having problems, though: When you use abs to wrap your numbers, you end up breaking certain assumptions that go along with two's-complement numbers. (abs(-x) and 256-x are not equal in most cases.) That's making your math wonky, as what should be the sign bit ends up lost in the shuffle -- and other bits are wrongly flipped because of it, and can't be flipped back because you tossed out the sign with abs.

For example, assume your cleartext byte is 65 ('A', if you care), and your RNG comes up with 192 for the pad byte. abs(65+192) % 256 will give you 1 as your "ciphertext". When you decrypt it, though, 1-192 == -191. In two's complement in 8 bits, that corresponds to 65, but abs(1-192) gives you 191.

You'd do better to use (cipherTextByte + (256 - keyByte)) % 256. In the example, 1 + (256-192) == 1 + 64 == 65.

Also, as has been mentioned, once you have encrypted bytes, they should be treated as just that -- bytes. They no longer form a string; they are and should always (or rather, til decrypted) be a sequence of bytes. Encodings and such could subtly modify the data, adding a byte here or converting something there, and you may end up with garbage when you try to decrypt it. But your biggest problem in your example is the math, rather than encoding issues.

share|improve this answer
    
Thx for your answer, too. –  PageFault Sep 15 '10 at 21:58

May be it's simpler, from coding point of view, to use a one-time pad derivative, where single Unicode characters are used in stead of single bits?

The specification resides at http://longterm.softf1.com/specifications/txor/index.html

The security and proofs are pretty much the same, but there is no need to handle any of the character encoding, UTF-8, etc. part.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.