Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am working through a problem which i was able to solve, all but for the last piece - i am not sure how can one do multiplication using bitwise operators:

0*8 = 0

1*8 = 8

2*8 = 16 

3*8 = 24 

4*8 = 32

Can you please recommend an approach to solve this?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

To multiply by 2 to the power of N (i.e. 2^N) shift the bits N times to the left

0000 0001 = 1 

times 4 = (2^2 => N = 2) = 2 bit shift : 0000 0100 = 4

times 8 = (2^3 -> N = 3) = 3 bit shift : 0010 0000 = 32

etc..

To divide shift the bits to the right.

The bits are whole 1 or 0 - you can't shift by a part of a bit thus if the number you're multiplying by is does not factor a whole value of N ie. 17 = 16 + 1 = 2^4 + 1

this to multiply by 17 you have to do a 4 bit shit to the left, and then add the original number again:

a = 0000 0011 = 2 

times 16 = (2^4 => N = 2) = 4 bit shift : 0001 1000 = 24

+ the number (0000 0001)

ie.

    0001 1000  (48)  
+   0000 0011   (3)
=============
    0001 1111  (51)

Edit: Update to original answer. Charles Petzold has written a fantastic book 'Code' that will explain all of this and more in the easiest of ways. I thoroughly recommend this.

share|improve this answer
    
right. it's not quite the same thing though. what if you want to multiply 3*17 –  Jam Sep 15 '10 at 21:45
    
yes I miswrote left and right lol –  Preet Sangha Sep 15 '10 at 21:54

I believe this should be a left shift. 8 is 2^3, so left shift 3 bits:

2 << 3 = 8

share|improve this answer

You'd factor the multiplicand into powers of 2.
3*17 = 3*(16+1) = 3*16 + 3*1 ... = 0011b << 4 + 0011b

share|improve this answer

To multiply two binary encoded numbers without a multiply instruction. It would be simple to iteratively add to reach the product.

unsigned int mult(x, y)
unsigned int x, y;
{
    unsigned int reg = 0;

    while(y--)
        reg += x;
    return reg;
}

Using bit operations, the characteristic of the data encoding can be exploited. As explained previously, a bit shift is the same as multiply by two. Using this an adder can be used on the powers of two.

// multiply two numbers with bit operations

unsigned int mult(x, y)
unsigned int x, y;
{
    unsigned int reg = 0;

    while (y != 0)
    {
        if (y & 1)
        {
            reg += x;
        }
        x <<= 1;
        y >>= 1;
    }
    return reg;
}
share|improve this answer
-(int)multiplyNumber:(int)num1 withNumber:(int)num2
{
    int mulResult =0;
    int ithBit;

    BOOL isNegativeSign = (num1<0 && num2>0) || (num1>0 && num2<0)   ;
    num1 = abs(num1);
    num2 = abs(num2);


    for(int i=0;i<sizeof(num2)*8;i++)
    {
        ithBit =  num2 & (1<<i);
        if(ithBit>0){
            mulResult +=(num1<<i);
        }

    }

    if (isNegativeSign) {
        mulResult =  ((~mulResult)+1 );
    }

    return mulResult;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.