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I have the following class:

public static class TestSomething {

    Integer test;

    public TestSomething(Integer test) {
        this.test = test;
    }

    // getter and setter for test
}

Ok, now create a collection of this class and serialize it with Gson:

Collection<TestSomething> tests = Arrays.asList(
    new TestSomething(1), 
    new TestSomething(2), 
    new TestSomething(3)
);
String json = new Gson().toJson(tests, new TypeToken<Collection<TestSomething>>() {}.getType());

After this, the String json is set to

[{"test":1},{"test":2},{"test":3}]

Which is great.

But now, all of my model classes inherit from a generic type Identifiable<T> which provides just two methods T getId() and void setId(T). So I change the TestSomething-class from above to

public static class TestSomething extends Identifiable<Long> {
    // same as above
}

When I try to put this through Gson.toJson(), Gson ends up with the following Exception:

java.lang.UnsupportedOperationException: Expecting parameterized type, got class path.to.TestSomething.
 Are you missing the use of TypeToken idiom?
 See http://sites.google.com/site/gson/gson-user-guide#TOC-Serializing-and-Deserializing-Gener
        at com.google.gson.TypeInfoFactory.getActualType(TypeInfoFactory.java:97)
        ...

So, what do I have to do to get this work?

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2 Answers

I don't know the answer, but I know that generic type resolution is a tricky thing to get right: specifically full type resolution from interface with type parameter T up through to generic parameter declaration (T=Long). In these cases it is not enough to check for Method object's parameters but also resolve generic type parameters. This is most likely what causes issues; it may be a bug in Gson.

Since you are serializing things, perhaps you could just omit any type declarations? Although your TypeToken is correct for the use case, maybe it confuses Gson.

But just in case you could not make Gson work with this, I know that of other JSON libraries Jackson can handle such cases correctly.

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Perhaps this issue was resolved in one of the Gson releases newer than what the original questioner was using, because the example in the original question now serializes as expected.

// output: 
// [{"test":1},{"test":2},{"test":3}]

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Collection;

import com.google.gson.Gson;
import com.google.gson.reflect.TypeToken;

public class Foo
{
  public static void main(String[] args)
  {
    Collection<TestSomething> tests = Arrays.asList(
        new TestSomething(1),
        new TestSomething(2),
        new TestSomething(3));
    String json = new Gson().toJson(tests, new TypeToken<Collection<TestSomething>>() {}.getType());
    System.out.println(json);
  }
}

class TestSomething extends Identifiable<Long>
{
  Integer test;

  public TestSomething(Integer test)
  {
    this.test = test;
  }

  @Override
  Long getId()
  {
    return new Long(test);
  }

  @Override
  void setId(Long t)
  {
    this.test = (int)(t.longValue());
  }
}

abstract class Identifiable<T>
{
  abstract T getId();
  abstract void setId(T t);
}
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