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I have 3 tables, foo, foo2bar, and bar. foo2bar is a many to many map between foo and bar. Here are the contents.

select * from foo
+------+
| fid  |
+------+
|    1 |
|    2 |
|    3 |
|    4 |
+------+

select * from foo2bar
+------+------+
| fid  | bid  |
+------+------+
|    1 |    1 |
|    1 |    2 |
|    2 |    1 |
|    2 |    3 |
|    4 |    4 |
+------+------+

select * from bar
+------+-------+------+
| bid  | value | zid  |
+------+-------+------+
|    1 |     2 |   10 |
|    2 |     4 |   20 |
|    3 |     8 |   30 |
|    4 |    42 |   30 |
+------+-------+------+

What I want to request is, "Give me a list of all the fid and values with zid of 30"

I expect an answer for all the fids, so the result would look like:

+------+--------+
| fid  | value  |
+------+--------+
|    1 |   null |
|    2 |      8 |
|    3 |   null |
|    4 |     42 |
+------+--------+
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5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted
SELECT * FROM foo
  LEFT OUTER JOIN (foo2bar JOIN bar ON (foo2bar.bid = bar.bid AND zid = 30))
  USING (fid);

Tested on MySQL 5.0.51.

This is not a subquery, it just uses parentheses to specify the precedence of joins.

share|improve this answer
    
ah didn't even think about precedence when doing joins... –  Pyrolistical Dec 16 '08 at 19:43
    
Actually, the parens are optional, as I'm sure Bill knows. –  dkretz Dec 16 '08 at 19:45
    
Bill, I think that may not work if there is a foo2bar record with no matching bar record, since it's an inner join internally? But I never use " ON " and " USING " in any case, so that's speculation. :) –  dkretz Dec 16 '08 at 19:48
    
Parens are optional of course, but they do allow you to override default precedence. Just like in arithmetic expressions: 10*10+10 equals 110, whereas 10*(10+10) equals 200. –  Bill Karwin Dec 16 '08 at 19:50
    
They are not optional in this case, its invalid syntax otherwise... –  Pyrolistical Dec 16 '08 at 19:51
SELECT * FROM
        foo LEFT JOIN
        (
        Foo2bar JOIN bar
             ON foo2bar.bid = bar.bid AND zid = 30
        )
        ON foo.fid = foo2bar.fid;

untested

share|improve this answer
    
you have a typo, but it does work. is the subquery bad for performance? –  Pyrolistical Dec 16 '08 at 19:40
    
As with Bill Karwin's, it not a subquery –  BCS Dec 16 '08 at 19:45

If you're not getting back a row for fid = 3 then your server is broken.

This code should do what I think you want:

SELECT
    F.fid,
    SQ.value
FROM
    dbo.Foo F
LEFT OUTER JOIN
     (
     SELECT F2B.fid, B.value
     FROM dbo.Bar B
     INNER JOIN dbo.Foo2Bar F2B ON F2B.bid = B.bid WHERE B.zid = 30
     ) SQ ON SQ.fid = F.fid

Keep in mind that it is possible to get back two values for a fid if it is related to two bars with a zid of 30.

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You are correct, I messed up my example, fid 3 row does exist –  Pyrolistical Dec 16 '08 at 19:52
    
Ugh, you are also correct in that if there are two bars with zid of 30 related to the same foo, there will be issues. My schema doesn't prevent that either... –  Pyrolistical Dec 16 '08 at 19:54

Working it out, you can start with your select. Don't include columns you don't want to ultimately see.

SELECT foo.fid, bar.value

Then we can do the WHERE clause, which can see is just as you expressed it.

SELECT foo.fid, bar.value  
WHERE bar.zid = 30

Now the tricky part to connect things together for our FROM clause, using LEFT JOINs because we want to see every fid, whether or not there are intermediate matches:

SELECT foo.fid, bar.value  
FROM foo  
LEFT JOIN foo2bar ON foo.fid = foo2bar.fid  
LEFT JOIN bar ON foo2bar.bid = bar.bid  
WHERE bar.zid = 30
OR bar.zid IS NULL
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That shouldn't work as it will not give rows that have a null zid (foo rows that don't map to a bar row) –  BCS Dec 16 '08 at 19:47

FWIW, the question isn't really about a many-to-many: this could quite simply be done as a union.

A real many-to-many in SQL is a CROSS JOIN

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