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I have something like this:

void MethodToBreak()
{
    // do something

    if(something)
    {
        MethodThatBreaks();
        return;
    }

    // do something
}

void MethodThatBreaks()
{
    // do something
}

So, I was wondering: is it possible to break execution from: MethodThatBreaks()? Then, I would have: if(something) MethodThatBreaks(); and if the condition inside if is true, nothing after that row would be executed.

NOTE: I know it's possible with else in this case, but I don't want that.

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Do you mean instead of the return you currently have? –  Nick Craver Sep 16 '10 at 9:23
    
Yes, that's exactly what I mean :) –  avance70 Sep 16 '10 at 9:24
    
No not really then, I mean you could throw an exception, or if they had return types then return MethodThatBreaks() on one line, but neither of those are appropriate solutions, what you have is the best route IMO. –  Nick Craver Sep 16 '10 at 9:25
1  
Why not restructure your method to get this behaviour? –  w69rdy Sep 16 '10 at 9:26
    
MethodThatBreaks() is a method which uses the callback to communicate a warning back to the WCF client. A warning would mean that the invoked method could not execute (hence the break/return), but at the same time, the invoked method is non-critical, for it to throw back an exception to the client. Also, MethodToBreak() has to remain void (IsOneWay=true), because while it isn't critical, it tends to execute for a few minutes. –  avance70 Sep 16 '10 at 10:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It would be a nightmare to maintain if you were to upset execution of one method from another. Trying to figure out why your control flow is all over the place six months down the line, or for a another developer, would be aneurysm-inducing.

There's nothing wrong with what you're already doing there, although personally I'd use an else. Is there a particular reason why you don't want to use else? If it's that the remaining code is too long that's perhaps and indication you should refactor.

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2  
Short-circuiting is a normal approach, that's what he's currently doing...do the work, and get out ASAP. It's not everyone's cup of tea, but it is a perfectly valid approach/style :) –  Nick Craver Sep 16 '10 at 9:27
    
I don't want else because I may have a case like this: while(something) if(something else) MethodThatBreaks() –  avance70 Sep 16 '10 at 9:29
1  
Then I don't see any problem with what you've already got, it's clear that if "something else" happens then you want to run a method then stop doing anything else. Like Nick says, it's perfectly normal. –  Dave Downs Sep 16 '10 at 9:31
    
Ok, I was just wondering, because each time I invoke MethodThatBreaks() I want to break whichever method invoked it. One thing I forgot to mention (and may be important) is that ALL methods that invoke MethodThatBreaks() are void. –  avance70 Sep 16 '10 at 9:48

Throwing an exception in MethodThatBreaks is one possibility. So in the client of the MethodToBreak you put try catch block.

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3  
Which is fine for errors but it seems like it needs to return regardless of the result of MethodThatBreaks. Using an exception for control flow in that cause is severely not advised... –  Dave Downs Sep 16 '10 at 9:28
    
@Dave "Using an exception for control flow in that cause is severely not advised". Absolutely! But the question was to do something that not a single line runs - not even a return. At least this is my understanding of the question. –  Aliostad Sep 16 '10 at 9:59
    
Yes, thanks, but I cannot use exceptions. I didn't want to complicate the question by explaining the current architecture: This is a WCF service/client application. I use exceptions on service if something illegal is performed, for example, I would throw an exception if someone logs on with a wrong user/password combination. In this case MethodThatBreaks() is used to communicate a warning that should not terminate the current session, but will terminate the method execution. –  avance70 Sep 16 '10 at 10:11

This can be done by: declare global variable

 a=null;
void MethodToBreak()
{
    // do something

    if(something)
    {
        MethodThatBreaks();
        if(a==null){

        } else{
        return;
        }
    }

    // do something
}

void MethodThatBreaks()
{
     a="somevalue";
    // do something
}
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