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I would like to print an Array of Arrays of Hashes, so I looked at perldsc, and ended up with

for my $j (0 .. $#aoaoh) {
    for my $aref (@aoaoh) {
    print '"' . join('","', @$aref[$j]), "\"\n";
    }
}

but it doesn't work.

Does anyone know how to do this?

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6  
Remember to post complete test programs. There might be something else that you are doing that's broken. Also "doesn't work" doesn't really tell us anything. What were you expecting to get and what did you get? Show us all output, error messages, warnings, and so on. –  brian d foy Sep 16 '10 at 12:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It works as far as you've gone. Adding some test data to your program gives us:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my @aoaoh = (
    [
        { a => 1, b => 2 },
        { c => 3, d => 4 },
    ],
    [
        { a => 101, b => 102 },
        { c => 103, d => 104 },
    ],
);

for my $j (0 .. $#aoaoh) {
    for my $aref (@aoaoh) {
    print '"' . join('","', @$aref[$j]), "\"\n";
    }
}

And running that gives:

$ ./aoaoh 
"HASH(0x9c45818)"
"HASH(0x9c70c48)"
"HASH(0x9c60418)"
"HASH(0x9c70c08)"

So you've successfully navigated the two levels of arrays and you're just left with the hash references to dereference. Something like this perhaps:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my @aoaoh = (
    [
        { a => 1, b => 2 },
        { c => 3, d => 4 },
    ],
    [
        { a => 101, b => 102 },
        { c => 103, d => 104 },
    ],
);

for my $j (0 .. $#aoaoh) {
    for my $aref (@aoaoh) {
        # print '"' . join('","', @$aref[$j]), "\"\n";
        for (keys %{$aref->[$j]}) {
            print "$_ -> $aref->[$j]{$_}\n";
        }
    }
}

Which gives:

$ ./aoaoh 
a -> 1
b -> 2
a -> 101
b -> 102
c -> 3
d -> 4
c -> 103
d -> 104

Personally, I'd write it like this as I think it's easier to deal with elements than indexes.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my @aoaoh = (
    [
        { a => 1, b => 2 },
        { c => 3, d => 4 },
    ],
    [
        { a => 101, b => 102 },
        { c => 103, d => 104 },
    ],
);

for my $aref (@aoaoh) {
    for my $href (@$aref) {
        for (keys %{$href}) {
            print "$_ -> $href->{$_}\n";
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
foreach my $aoh (@aoaoh) {

    foreach my $hashref ( @{$aoh} ) {

        foreach my $key ( keys %{$hashref} ) {

            print $key . " => " . $hashref->{$key}, "\n";
        }

        print "#" x 40, "\n";
    }
}

UPDATE: Sorry, it must be array (not array ref)

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To loop through the whole kit & caboodle:

use 5.012;
use warnings;

my @array = (
    [
        { a => 1, b => 2 },
        { c => 3, d => 4 },
    ],
    [
        { a => 101, b => 102 },
        { c => 103, d => 104 },
    ],
);

for my $root (@array) {
    for my $each_array_of_hashes (@$root) {
        for my $k (keys %{ $each_array_of_hashes } ) {
            say $k, ' => ', $each_array_of_hashes->{$k};
        }
    }
}

Is this what you're after?

/I3az/

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1  
If you are going to use say, please use one of the pragmas that turn it on. Otherwise people will think your example is broken (because it is). –  Chas. Owens Sep 16 '10 at 11:03
    
re: Chas comment. If you have pre 5.10 version of Perl then look at Perl::Say CPAN module. Otherwise amend say to print and postfix with a newline (ie. print "some text\n"; as opposed to say "some text"; –  draegtun Sep 16 '10 at 11:17
    
@Chas. Owens: Have updated now. Hopefully people won't think its now broken because they're not running on perl 5.12 :) –  draegtun Sep 16 '10 at 11:21
    
Typo: thats Perl6::Say - search.cpan.org/dist/Perl6-Say –  draegtun Sep 16 '10 at 11:40

Have a look at perlreftut, it will help you, and see the answer below.

  #!/usr/bin/perl

    use strict;
    use warnings;

    my @aoaoh = (
        [
            { a => 1, b => 2 },
            { c => 3, d => 4 },
        ],
        [
            { a => 101, b => 102 },
            { c => 103, d => 104 },
        ],
    );
    for my $j (0 .. $#aoaoh) {
        for my $aref (@{$aoaoh[$j]}) {
            for my $test (keys %{$aref})
            {
               print"$test => ${$aref}{$test}\n";
            }
        }
    }

output:

a => 1
b => 2
c => 3
d => 4
a => 101
b => 102
c => 103
d => 104
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