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Say I have this data set

  user  | group
--------+-------
a@a.com |   A
a@a.com |   B
b@b.com |   A
c@c.com |   B
d@d.com |   A
d@d.com |   B
d@d.com |   C

I want to convert this into a table like this:

  user  | IN_A  | IN_B  | IN_C
--------+-------+-------+-------
a@a.com | TRUE  | TRUE  | FALSE
b@b.com | TRUE  | FALSE | FALSE
c@c.com | FALSE | TRUE  | FALSE
d@d.com | TRUE  | TRUE  | TRUE

I've got:

SELECT
  user,
  IF(LOCATE('A', GROUP_CONCAT(group)) > 0, TRUE, FALSE) AS IN_A,
  IF(LOCATE('B', GROUP_CONCAT(group)) > 0, TRUE, FALSE) AS IN_B,
  IF(LOCATE('C', GROUP_CONCAT(group)) > 0, TRUE, FALSE) AS IN_C
FROM users
GROUP BY user

What I'm wondering is if there is a better way to known if an aggregated field contains a value, or if this is the only way?

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5 Answers 5

I guess this is the only way i.e., GROUP_CONCAT

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The only other way I've found is SELECT u.user, u1.group, g2.group FROM users u LEFT JOIN users u1 ON u.user = u1.user AND u1.group = "A" LEFT JOIN users u2 ON u.user = u2.user AND u2.group = "B" GROUP BY u.user; –  Nick Sep 16 '10 at 13:25
    
its not pretty, but it can work –  Nathan Feger Apr 26 '12 at 22:03

You can try something like this piece:

SELECT distinct user,  
IF(EXISTS
    (SELECT users_a.user 
        from users as users_a 
    where users_a.group = 'A' and
        users_a.user = users.user), 
TRUE, FALSE) as IN_A,
IF(EXISTS
    (SELECT users_b.user 
        from users as users_b 
    where users_b.group = 'B' and
        users_b.user = users.user), 
TRUE, FALSE) as IN_B,
IF(EXISTS
    (SELECT users_c.user 
        from users as users_c 
    where users_c.group = 'C' and
        users_c.user = users.user), 
TRUE, FALSE) as IN_C
FROM `users` WHERE 1

Tryed here works fine!

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Not sure how many groups you will be having but if its a finiate number I would suggest that you create a column for each group or use the mysql data type SET (bit masking).

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It is finite - I am trying to move from a dual-key (user/group) system to a single key (user) system with each group having its own column. –  Nick Sep 16 '10 at 13:23

I'm not sure if this is the way you do things (as I'm quite new here) but if that's the example you're using wouldn't it be easier to have the columns user, IN_A, IN_B and IN_C? Especially since that way you wouldn't be repeating the user data again

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It would - thats what I'm trying to achieve :) The Data Set uses User and Group as a double-column PRIMARY KEY. I want to may User the PRIMARY KEY and split the Groups into columns. –  Nick Sep 16 '10 at 13:22

The right way to do it:

SELECT
   user,
   IF(SUM(group = 'A'), TRUE, FALSE) AS IN_A,
   IF(SUM(group = 'B'), TRUE, FALSE) AS IN_B,
   IF(SUM(group = 'C'), TRUE, FALSE) AS IN_C
FROM users
GROUP BY user
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