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I have two scripts and two conf file (actually perl scripts too):

conf1.pl

@some_array = ({name =>"orange", deny = > "yes"},
               {name =>"apple", deny = > "no"});

conf2.pl

@some_array = ({name =>"male", deny = > "yes"},
               {name =>"female", deny = > "no"});

script.pl

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
use strict;
our %deny = ();
call_another_script.pl_somehow_with_param conf1.pl
call_another_script.pl_somehow_with_param conf2.pl
foreach my $key (%deny) {
    print $deny{$key},"\n";
}

another_script.pl

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
my $conf_file = shift;
do $conf_file;
foreach my $item (@some_array) {
    print $item->{name},"\n";
    if (defined $deny) {
       $deny{$item{name}}++ if $item{deny} eq "yes";
    }
}

I would like to call another_script.pl with conf filenames from script.pl so %deny will be visible in another_script.pl. And I dont wanna use Perl modules and I want to have scripts in separate files. For example

./another_script.pl conf2.pl

and

./script

share|improve this question
8  
"I want to do something and I explicitly don't want to use the feature that Perl has for doing this thing. But I don't want to explain why I'm imposing such an arbitrary constraint." –  Dave Cross Sep 16 '10 at 11:19

2 Answers 2

This problem is what modules are designed to solve. What you are asking is similar to "how do I conditionally execute code with out if?". We can tell you how to do it, but it isn't a good idea.

conf1.pl

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

our @a = (1 .. 10);

conf2.pl

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

our @a = ("a" .. "j");

master.pl

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

our %deny;
do "conf1.pl";
do "child.pl";
do "conf2.pl";
do "child.pl";

use Data::Dumper;
print Dumper \%deny;

child.pl

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

our %deny;
our @a;

for my $item (@a) {
    $deny{$item}++;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The problem with rewards for answering what they ask comes up when they ask for the wrong thing. This is so nasty, why would you show him this? –  masonk Sep 16 '10 at 18:31
    
@masonk I was going to show him how to do it correctly as well so he could see the difference, but I haven't had the time yet to go back and fix it. –  Chas. Owens Sep 16 '10 at 19:14
    
I just wanted to do as in bash: write one script, another script - each works independently and takes parameters. And just to call one script from another when when it is necessary to solve more general problem. Without headaches with the scopes and modules. And each script can be executed independently. Like: master #!/bin/sh VARIABLE=value export VARIABLE ./child child #!/bin/sh echo $VARIABLE –  gapsf Sep 17 '10 at 2:38
    
@gapsf Then use bash. Perl is not bash. If you try to force Perl to be like bash you will miss out on all of the stuff that makes Perl better than bash. –  Chas. Owens Sep 17 '10 at 12:47

From http://www.serverwatch.com/tutorials/article.php/1128981/The-Perl-Basics-You-Need-To-Know.htm

Making Variables Global With Strict Pragma On First you use:

use strict;

Then you use:

use vars qw( %hash @array);

This declares the named variables as package globals in the current package. They may be referred to within the same file and package with their unqualified names; and in different files/packages with their fully qualified names. That's all that I was needed!

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