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Working in SQL Server 2005, I have a stored procedure that inserts a record and returns the new ID via SELECT @@IDENTITY; as the last command.

I then want to call this from another stored proc, and get the value of the new ID.

But I can't work out how to get the value returned from the first procedure.

Example:

CREATE PROCEDURE spMyInsert(@Field1 VARCHAR(10)) AS 
BEGIN

    INSERT INTO tMyTable (Column1) VALUES (@Field1); // ID column implicitly set

    SELECT @@IDENTITY ID;

END


CREATE PROCEDURE spMyMain AS
BEGIN

    DECLARE @NewID INT;

    EXEC spMyInsert 'TEST';

    // How do I set @NewID to the value returned from spMyInsert?

END

There is another question that nearly answers my question, but not quite. This explains how to insert the results into another table, but all I want to do is store it in a local variable.

Looking at other similar questions, the general answer is to change to either set an OUTPUT variable or create a function to do it, but I can't do this in my case as other .NET data access stuff uses the same stored proc, and I don't want to have to duplicate all the work of the stored procs as functions as well.

I couple of things that I've tried but all fail are:

SET @NewID = (EXEC spMyInsert 'TEST');

SET @NewID = (SELECT ID FROM (EXEC spMyInsert 'TEST'));

Anybody know how to do this?

Thanks, Ben

share|improve this question
1  
Why don't you want to use OUTPUT parameters? For returning scalar values these are the best option. You can set a default for the parameter if you just want to avoid having to change existing code calling the same procedure. –  Martin Smith Sep 16 '10 at 11:46
    
It's clear from the comments people have left on this post and for other questions that I really do need to use an OUTPUT parameter. I'll look at the effort needed to change it all. The problem I have that there are a few dependencies that I don't want to break! –  BG100 Sep 16 '10 at 12:16
    
+1 vote for everyone who suggested SCOPE_IDENTITY instead of @@IDENTITY!! –  BG100 Sep 16 '10 at 13:39

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

By the way you should probably check that @@identity is what you need as opposed to scope_identity.

If it is what you need then it will still be accessible in the calling stored procedure too.

CREATE PROCEDURE spMyMain 
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @NewID INT;

    EXEC spMyInsert 'TEST';

    SET @NewID = @@IDENTITY

    SELECT @NewID AS '@NewID'

END

The more general solution that would need to be applied if you use scope_identity and don't want to use either output parameters or the procedure return code is

CREATE PROCEDURE spMyMain AS
BEGIN

 DECLARE @NewID INT;

    DECLARE @IdHolder TABLE
    (
    id INT
    )

    INSERT INTO @IdHolder
    EXEC spMyInsert 'TEST';

    IF @@ROWCOUNT<>1
    RAISERROR('Blah',16,1)

     SELECT @NewID = id FROM @IdHolder

END
share|improve this answer
    
I considered doing it like this also, but thought that it's not a very elegant way to do it. Also, thanks for the scope_identity heads up! –  BG100 Sep 16 '10 at 12:20
    
+1 Good advice on scope_identity and a working solution. –  Wix Sep 16 '10 at 15:34

First, don't use @@IDENTITY, use SCOPE_IDENTITY() instead (search this site or Google for the reason why). Then just return the value in an output parameter:

CREATE PROCEDURE spMyInsert(@Field1 VARCHAR(10), @NewID int output) AS  
BEGIN 
    INSERT INTO tMyTable (Column1) VALUES (@Field1);
    SET @NewID = scope_identity();
END 
 go

CREATE PROCEDURE spMyMain AS 
BEGIN 
     DECLARE @NewID INT; 
     EXEC spMyInsert @Field1 = 'TEST', @NewID = @NewID OUTPUT; 
END
go
share|improve this answer
    
The OP says in the question they don't want to use output parameters. Not clear why though actually. –  Martin Smith Sep 16 '10 at 11:45
    
Good point, I obviously didn't read very carefully. I'm not sure why either, but presumably the real proc is actually more complex. And there's no reason not to use both a result set and an output parameter, of course. –  Pondlife Sep 16 '10 at 11:48
    
Thanks, there is clearly loads of reasons to use OUTPUT params and not do it like this. The problem is that I have a few dependencies I don't want to break. Also, thanks for the info about SCOPE_IDENTITY!! –  BG100 Sep 16 '10 at 12:19

The issue here is that the spMyInsert returns a Select. When you execute spMyMain it will return the Select from spMyInsert and then the select from spMyMain

I would suggest that you amend spMyInsert to utilise OUTPUT parameters

CREATE PROCEDURE spMyInsert(@Field1 VARCHAR(10), @NewId int output) AS 
BEGIN

    INSERT INTO tMyTable (Column1) VALUES (@Field1); // ID column implicitly set

    SELECT @NewId = @@SCOPE_IDENTITY;

END

and then

CREATE PROCEDURE spMyMain AS
BEGIN

    DECLARE @NewID INT;
Set @NewId = 0

    EXEC spMyInsert 'TEST', @NewId output;

select @NewId
    // How do I set @NewID to the value returned from spMyInsert?

END

Note that I have also changed @@Identity to @@scope_identity It is better to use @@Scope_Identity as that will return the new ID that applies to the current connection.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it's clear that I need to start using OUTPUT params. And thanks for the SCOPE_IDENTITY heads up. –  BG100 Sep 16 '10 at 12:21

Try this:

Execute @NewID = spMyInsert 'TEST'

Edit: After reading his question more thoroughly and realizing he was dealing with a select rather than a return: Could you wrap that procedure in a function call and then call the function?

select @NewId = from fnMyInsert('TEST')
share|improve this answer
    
This would get the return value of spMyInsert not the SELECT output (might be what is needed though if spMyInsert can be changed to use the return code for that purpose.). –  Martin Smith Sep 16 '10 at 11:43
    
Ah, you are right. I didn't read the question thoroughly enough. I was thinking it was a return. –  Wix Sep 16 '10 at 12:17
    
Thanks, this is the answer I was looking for. I've tested it and it works, although it has the side effect of returning the results of both selects when the outer stored proc is called, which is going to cause other problems. So I think I'm going to look at reworking it to use OUTPUT params as most people suggest. Thanks! –  BG100 Sep 16 '10 at 12:23
    
@Wix: I wrote that comment before I saw your comment about thinking it was a return.... but I have tested it, and it does actually work! –  BG100 Sep 16 '10 at 12:24
    
Shouldn't work unless you have a return in there and doesn't work for me. declare @NewID int Execute @NewID = spMyInsert 'TEST' select @NewID always returns 0. –  Martin Smith Sep 16 '10 at 12:32

An output parameter is the way to go, but if you really can't change the inner SP then, as you say, you can have the inner SP return its results to a table and then get the value out of there.

eg.

declare @NewID int,
@Customer table(CustomerId int);

insert into @Customer
exec spMyInsert 'TEST';

select @NewID = CustomerId from @Customer;
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm...just like Martin Smith said –  Paul Spangle Sep 16 '10 at 12:31

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