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I want to use if-else condition in one line. I have used the ternary operator, but doesn't seem to work. Any clues?

class Array
 def painful_injection

   each do |item|
     sum = yield (defined?(sum).nil?) ? 0 : sum, item #pass the arguments to the block

   end
   sum
 end
end
puts [1, 2, 3, 4].painful_injection {|sum, nxt_item| sum + nxt_item}

This gives me an error:

Error :undefined method `+' for false:FalseClass
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maybe more ()? yield (((defined?(sum).nil?) ? 0 : sum), item) –  Nakilon Sep 16 '10 at 12:07
    
er, no that wont work. It wud still complain about that error, wont it? –  badmaash Sep 16 '10 at 12:17
    
that expression ((defined?(sum).nil?) ? 0 : sum) wud still cause false to be passed to my block.. –  badmaash Sep 16 '10 at 12:19
2  
What is it that you are ultimately trying to achieve? –  Mark Thomas Sep 16 '10 at 12:32
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3 Answers

There are a couple of problems here. One is that defined? of some variable doesn't return nil within an assignment to that variable e.g.

irb(main):012:0> some_new_var = defined?(some_new_var)
=> "local-variable"

You also need some extra parentheses due to operator precedence.

Finally, variables defined inside a block are only available inside that call to the block so when each yields subsequent items the previous value of sum would be lost.

Why not just set sum to 0 outside of the each e.g.

class Array
 def painful_injection
   sum = 0
   each do |item|
     sum = yield(sum, item) #pass the arguments to the block
   end
   sum
 end
end

... but then just might as well just use normal inject

[1,2,3,4].inject(0) { |sum, item| sum + item }

so perhaps you need to clarify the problem you're trying to solve?

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2  
It's not necessary to pass an initial accumulator explicitly, if the enumerable elements are already of the right type, so you can leave out the (0) part. Also, Enumerable#inject takes an optional Symbol argument denoting the method to use to combine the elements. All in all, you can further reduce (pun intended) that last line to [1, 2, 3, 4].inject(:+), which is indeed pretty nice compared to the OP's original version. (Although of course until the OP clarifies his requirements it is impossible to know whether or not they actually do the same thing.) –  Jörg W Mittag Sep 16 '10 at 13:43
    
Not for the example [1, 2, 3, 4], but for an empty array a sum without initial value will return nil, which makes no sense. So this zero is indeed required: xs.sum := xs.inject(0, :+) –  tokland Oct 22 '12 at 19:36
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There are two errors here.

  1. Beware of operator priority. Use parenthesis when you are not sure
  2. If you don't define sum outside the block, then sum won't preserve its value outside the blog.

Here's the code

class Array
  def painful_injection
    sum = 0
    each do |item|
      sum = yield((sum.zero? ? 0 : sum), item) # pass the arguments to the block
    end
    sum
 end
end
puts [1, 2, 3, 4].painful_injection {|sum, nxt_item| sum + nxt_item}
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I think this is a sollution to this specific case.

class Array
  def painful_injection
    sum = 0
    each do |item|
       sum = yield(sum,item)
    end
    sum
  end
end
puts [1, 2, 3, 4].painful_injection {|sum, nxt_item| sum + nxt_item}

I hope this is what you're trying to achieve, I didn't get the inline if to work for the following reason:

If you use it like this:

 sum = yield((defined?(sum) ? sum  : sum = 0),item)

you get a problem because sum is defined but will become nil at some point and you cannot test it for defined? and nil? in the same line because the nil? test will fall over the fact that it's not defined.

So I think there is no solution to your problem.

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