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How do I get all the values in a group by statement?

mysql>select * from mytable;
+------+--------+--------+
| name | amount | status |
+------+--------+--------+
| abc  |     12 | A      | 
| abc  |     55 | A      | 
| xyz  |     12 | B      | 
| xyz  |     12 | C      | 
+------+--------+--------+
4 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql>select name, count(*) from mytable where status = 'A' group by name;
+------+----------+
| name | count(*) |
+------+----------+
| abc  |        2 | 
+------+----------+
1 row in set (0.01 sec)

Expected result:

+------+----------+
| name | count(*) |
+------+----------+
| abc  |        2 | 
| xyz  |        0 | 
+------+----------+
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There's a funny trick you can use where COUNT(column) counts the number of non-null values; you also use a self-join (when doing this):

SELECT a.name, COUNT(b.name)
  FROM mytable AS a LEFT OUTER JOIN mytable AS b
    ON a.name = b.name AND b.status = 'A'
 GROUP BY a.name;

This would work in all versions of SQL; not all variants will allow you to sum on a Boolean expression, which is undoubtedly faster and more direct when supported.

Another way to write it is:

SELECT a.name, COUNT(b.name)
  FROM mytable AS a LEFT OUTER JOIN
       (SELECT name FROM mytable WHERE status = 'A') AS b
    ON a.name = b.name
 GROUP BY a.name;
share|improve this answer
    
:in this scenario, if we want to show the amount column values, SQL only returns the first value, that is 12 ! what can we do to see 12 and 55 ? –  Alaa A. F. Sep 30 '13 at 16:16
1  
You'd have to specify the query result you want to see more precisely. If you mean you want to see the group values and the individual row values, then you'd join the result from the GROUP BY query (treated as a sub-query) with the original table: SELECT m.*, s.group_count FROM mytable AS m JOIN (SELECT a.name, COUNT(b.name) FROM mytable AS a LEFT OUTER JOIN mytable AS b ON a.name = b.name AND b.status = 'A' GROUP BY a.name) AS s ON m.name = s.name; or thereabouts. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 30 '13 at 16:25
    
Honestly, i didn't understood this query :-s could you please describe it simpler ? What i want is to get both rows values with only one name as the parent –  Alaa A. F. Sep 30 '13 at 16:34
1  
I need to understand what you are seeking. Send email - see my profile. Show the required output for the sample data above, or show all the data for an extended version. No promise on the timeline for a response. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 30 '13 at 19:07

Your current solution removes all records which do not have status A, so name xyz is missing.

This should give you the distinct names and the count of records which have status A:

Select name, Sum( status = 'A' )
From mytable
Group By name;

This general solution would also work with other DBs than MySQL:

Select name, Sum( Case When status = 'A' Then 1 Else 0 End )
...
share|improve this answer
    
This is working in the example shown above. But does not work with the query that I am working on. I guess I will have to use left join or something. –  shantanuo Sep 16 '10 at 12:53
    
I'm afraid your example above is the only information we have... Please try to provide more information. –  Peter Lang Sep 18 '10 at 6:52

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