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I wanted to use a custom background for my UITextFields. This works fine except for the fact that I have to use UITextBorderStyleNone to make it look pretty. This forces the text to stick to the left without any padding.

Can I set a padding manually so that it looks similar to UITextBorderStyleRoundedRect except for using my custom background image?

Thanks a lot in advance, Sebastian

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16 Answers 16

up vote 419 down vote accepted

I found a neat little hack to set the left padding for this exact situation.

Basically, you set the leftView property of the UITextField to be an empty view of the size of the padding you want:

UIView *paddingView = [[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(0, 0, 5, 20)];
textField.leftView = paddingView;
textField.leftViewMode = UITextFieldViewModeAlways;

Worked like a charm for me!

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3  
Great simple solution. Just do not forget to [paddingView release]; afterwards as you would have memory leak. –  Lukasz Dec 29 '10 at 10:27
5  
Think that this isn't good idea :) looks like a hack, and works only for left padding. Better solution is to subclass UITextField, and override - (CGRect)textREctForBounds and -(CGRect)editingRectForBounds methods, like in Nate Flink's solution, but without category –  tt.Kilew Nov 30 '11 at 7:05
11  
Note that if you have two or more text fields, you need to have different UIViews with which to 'pad' each field –  coco May 9 '12 at 19:48
1  
Really? You think that is a good soluton? Exploit the leftView? –  Chris Pillen May 15 '12 at 8:01
3  
It is not working with multiple textfields. Just consumes so much memory and later crashes. –  gbesler Apr 25 at 14:50

I created this category implementation and added it to the top of the .m file.

@implementation UITextField (custom)
    - (CGRect)textRectForBounds:(CGRect)bounds {
        return CGRectMake(bounds.origin.x + 10, bounds.origin.y + 8,
                          bounds.size.width - 20, bounds.size.height - 16);
    }
    - (CGRect)editingRectForBounds:(CGRect)bounds {
        return [self textRectForBounds:bounds];
    }
@end

Based off the link Piotr Blasiak provided. It seemed simpler then creating a whole new subclass, and also simpler then adding the additional UIView. Still, it seems like something is missing to not be able to control the padding inside a text field.

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5  
This throws warnings about categories overriding methods. See this answer to suppress them. –  pdenya Jun 7 '12 at 17:35
3  
I prefer not doing this in a category, but other than that this is a cleaner solution than the accepted answer. –  Bob Vork Dec 4 '12 at 13:46
8  
Used this idea for a subclass, worked like a charm! –  Ege Akpinar Dec 6 '12 at 17:57
    
It's better to use CGRectInset() for something like this, instead of rolling your own. It's a little cleaner looking as well: return CGRectInset(bounds, 10, 8); –  Dennis Munsie May 14 at 18:31
1  
@shashwat yes, you can specify any padding you'd want –  Ege Akpinar Jun 13 at 12:49

A good approach to add padding to UITextField is to subclass with an edgeInsets property. You then set the edgeInsets and the UITextField will be drawn accordingly. This will also function correctly with a custom leftView or rightView set.

OSTextField.h

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>

@interface OSTextField : UITextField

@property (nonatomic, assign) UIEdgeInsets edgeInsets;

@end

OSTextField.m

#import "OSTextField.h"

@implementation OSTextField

- (id)initWithFrame:(CGRect)frame{
    self = [super initWithFrame:frame];
    if (self) {
        self.edgeInsets = UIEdgeInsetsMake(0, 0, 0, 0);
    }
    return self;
}

-(id)initWithCoder:(NSCoder *)aDecoder{
    self = [super initWithCoder:aDecoder];
    if(self){
        self.edgeInsets = UIEdgeInsetsMake(0, 0, 0, 0);
    }
    return self;
}

- (CGRect)textRectForBounds:(CGRect)bounds {
    return [super textRectForBounds:UIEdgeInsetsInsetRect(bounds, self.edgeInsets)];
}

- (CGRect)editingRectForBounds:(CGRect)bounds {
    return [super editingRectForBounds:UIEdgeInsetsInsetRect(bounds, self.edgeInsets)];
}

@end
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This is an fantastic solution, great thinking. –  Adam Waite Feb 9 at 21:41
    
Great answer! Would be even better with an example on how to use it. (Even though I could realize how to use it...) –  Johan Karlsson Mar 17 at 10:58
    
This seems to be a better solution than abusing accessory views; however, it breaks down when using auto layout. I have not tested this thoroughly, but overriding intrinsicContentSize and adding the additional space from the content inset fixes the text being clipped. –  Anthony Mattox Aug 22 at 13:47

Just subclass UITextField like this:

@implementation DFTextField


- (CGRect)textRectForBounds:(CGRect)bounds
{
    return CGRectInset(bounds, 10.0f, 0);
}

- (CGRect)editingRectForBounds:(CGRect)bounds
{
    return [self textRectForBounds:bounds];
}


@end

This adds horizontal padding of 10 points either side.

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You can't set padding. Instead have a UIView which has your background image and the UITextField inside of it. Set the UITextField width as UIViewWidth-(paddingSize x 2) and the height similarly and then set it at point paddingSize,paddingSize.

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great answer! easiest way to do it! :D –  Oscar Yuandinata May 26 at 7:21

Based on Evil Trout's answer you might wanna create a category to make it easier to use across multiple applications.

Header file:

@interface UITextField (PaddingText)

-(void) setLeftPadding:(int) paddingValue;

-(void) setRightPadding:(int) paddingValue;
@end

Implementation file:

#import "UITextField+PaddingText.h"

@implementation UITextField (PaddingText)

-(void) setLeftPadding:(int) paddingValue
{
    UIView *paddingView = [[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(0, 0, paddingValue, self.frame.size.height)];
    self.leftView = paddingView;
    self.leftViewMode = UITextFieldViewModeAlways;
}

-(void) setRightPadding:(int) paddingValue
{
    UIView *paddingView = [[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(0, 0, paddingValue, self.frame.size.height)];
    self.rightView = paddingView;
    self.rightViewMode = UITextFieldViewModeAlways;
}

@end

Usage Example

#import "UITextField+PaddingText.h"

[self.YourTextField setLeftPadding:20.0f];

Hope it helps you out guys

Cheers

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5  
this should be the accepted answer.. –  Balan Prabhu Feb 20 at 19:32
    
Where do I add the actual paddingValue? –  dot Feb 22 at 3:34
    
@dot I just added an usage example showing how to use it. –  Paulo Miguel Almeida Feb 22 at 15:29
    
awesome, thanks! –  dot Feb 24 at 21:08

I was based off Nate's solution, but then i found it that this causes problems when you use the leftView/rightView properties, so its better tune the super's implementation, because it will take the left/right view's into account.

- (CGRect)textRectForBounds:(CGRect)bounds {
    CGRect ret = [super textRectForBounds:bounds];
    ret.origin.x = ret.origin.x + 5;
    ret.size.width = ret.size.width - 10;
    return ret;
}

- (CGRect)editingRectForBounds:(CGRect)bounds {
    return [self textRectForBounds:bounds];
}
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^ these suggestions are great for those who are programmatically creating an interface.

But there are two LAZY EASY WAYS for those of us who use the Xcode interface builder:

  • easier: put a UIImageView behind a text field

  • easiest: change the border style on your to the simple black square (second from left option), then add your image as a background image. The image takes precedence over the square, so you still get the padding needed for a normal image background, without the square actually being drawn on.

EDIT: you can also use the black sphere (third from left option when selecting the UITextBox in IB), it does not work with the far right, "graphical sphere" style.

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In iOS 6 myTextField.leftView = paddingView; is causing issue

This solves the problem

myTextField.layer.sublayerTransform = CATransform3DMakeTranslation(5, 0, 0);
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Another consideration is that, if you have more than one UITextField where you are adding padding, is to create a separate UIView for each textfield - because they cannot be shared.

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Why not Attributed String !?!, this is one of the blessing feature of IOS 6.0 :)

NSMutableParagraphStyle *mps = [[NSMutableParagraphStyle alloc] init];
            mps.firstLineHeadIndent = 5.0f;
UIColor *placeColor = self.item.bgColor;

textFieldInstance.attributedPlaceholder = [[NSAttributedString alloc] initWithString:@"My Place Holder" attributes:@{NSForegroundColorAttributeName: placeColor, NSFontAttributeName : [UIFont systemFontOfSize:7.0f], NSParagraphStyleAttributeName : mps}];
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@Evil trout's answer is great. I have been using this approach for quite a some time now. The only thing it lacks is "dealing with numerous text fields". I tried other approaches but does not seem to work.

Subclassing UITextField just to add a padding didn't make any sense to me. So, I iterated over all UITextFields to add the padding.

-(void) addPaddingToAllTextFields:(UIView*)view {

    for(id currentView in [view subviews]){
        if([currentView isKindOfClass:[UITextField class]]) {
            // Change value of CGRectMake to fit ur need
            [currentView setLeftView:[[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(0, 0, 10, 20)]];
            [currentView setLeftViewMode:UITextFieldViewModeAlways];
        }

        if([currentView respondsToSelector:@selector(subviews)]){
            [textfieldarray addObjectsFromArray:[self addPaddingToAllTextFields:currentView]];
        }
    }
}
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the method can be called by [self addPaddingToAllTextFields:[self view]]; –  Kishor Kundan Oct 25 '13 at 6:44
    
Since textfieldarray isn't defined in the second if block, I used this snippet (thanks!) with success after replacing the contents of the second if with for(id subSubView in [view subviews]){[self addPaddingToAllTextFields:subSubView];} –  adamup Nov 21 '13 at 1:34

Brody's solution worked perfect for me. I have had to add side views on a textfield and add additional padding. So by implementing the custom UIEdgeInsets property to a UITextField subclass I have managed to achieve the task. I'm going to use this new subclass in all of my projects.

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The best solution I found so far is a category. That's how I add a 5 points padding to left and right:

@implementation UITextField (Padding)

#pragma clang diagnostic push
#pragma clang diagnostic ignored "-Wobjc-protocol-method-implementation"
- (CGRect)textRectForBounds:(CGRect)bounds {
    return CGRectMake(bounds.origin.x + 5, bounds.origin.y,
                      bounds.size.width - 10, bounds.size.height);
}
- (CGRect)editingRectForBounds:(CGRect)bounds {
    return [self textRectForBounds:bounds];
}
#pragma clang diagnostic pop

@end

The #pragma's are just for removing the annoying warnings

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The thing with method overloading in categories is, that it will be marked as unused in AppCode, which it is in fact. Good idea, but not very secure because it is easily removed when you run "Optimize imports" (no problem for Xcode users though, but we all know the limited code-centric features) –  Sebastian Wramba Feb 12 at 10:20
    
Is it a simple bummer category that will apply padding for all text fields in the app? –  Andy May 12 at 17:45
    
@Andy no it applies only when you import it, you will need to create a class UITextField+Padding and import it in the viewcontroller or class you have a textfield with padding –  Mongi Zaidi May 12 at 17:55

Based on @Evil Trout's most voted answer I created a custom method in my VController class, like shown bellow:

- (void) modifyTextField:(UITextField *)textField
{
    UIView *paddingView = [[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(0, 0, 5, 20)];
    textField.leftView = paddingView;
    textField.leftViewMode = UITextFieldViewModeAlways;
    textField.rightView = paddingView;
    textField.rightViewMode = UITextFieldViewModeAlways;

    [textField setBackgroundColor:[UIColor whiteColor]];
    [textField setTextColor:[UIColor blackColor]];
}

Now I can call that method inside (viewDidLoad method) and send any of my TextFields to that method and add padding for both right and left, and give text and background colors by writing just one line of code, as follows:

[self modifyTextField:self.firstNameTxtFld];

This Worked perfectly on iOS 7! I know that adding too much Views might make this a bit heavier class to be loaded. But when concerned about the difficulty in other solutions, I found myself more biased to this method and more flexible with using this way. ;)

Thanks for the Hack "Evil Trout"! (bow)

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I found it far easier to use a non-editable UITextView and set the contentOffset

uiTextView.contentOffset = CGPointMake(8, 7);
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I had to make these negative to work, but they worked! –  Louie Apr 14 '12 at 16:06
    
uiTextView.contentOffset = CGPointMake(-8, -7); –  Louie Apr 14 '12 at 16:07
7  
There is no contentOffset property in UITextField. Maybe a misunderstood of UITextView. –  Orlando Leite Sep 21 '12 at 15:36

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