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The following snippet creates a "typical test array", the purpose of this array is to test an assortment of things in my program. Is there a way or is it even possible to change the type of elements in an array?

import numpy as np
import random
from random import uniform, randrange, choice

# ... bunch of silly code ...

def gen_test_array( ua, low_inc, med_inc, num_of_vectors ):
  #typical_array = [ zone_id, ua, inc, veh, pop, hh, with_se, is_cbd, re, se=0, oe]
  typical_array = np.zeros( shape = ( num_of_vectors, 11 ) )

  for i in range( 0, num_of_vectors ):
    typical_array[i] = [i, int( ua ), uniform( low_inc / 2, med_inc * 2 ), uniform( 0, 6 ),
                        randrange( 100, 5000 ), randrange( 100, 500 ),
                        choice( [True, False] ), choice( [True, False] ),
                        randrange( 100, 5000 ), randrange( 100, 5000 ),
                        randrange( 100, 5000 ) ]

  return typical_array
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The way to do this in numpy is to use a structured array.

However, in many cases where you're using heterogeneous data, a simple python list is a much better choice.

Regardless, the example you gave above will work perfectly as a "normal" numpy array. You can just make everything a float in the example you gave. (Everything appears to be an int, except for two columns of floats... The bools can easily be represented as ints.)

Nonetheless, to illustrate using structured dtypes...

import numpy as np

ua = 5 # No idea what "ua" is in your code above...
low_inc, med_inc = 0.5, 2.0 # Again, no idea what these are...

num = 100
num_fields = 11

# Use more descriptive names than "col1"! I'm just generating the names as placeholders
dtype = {'names':['col%i'%i for i in range(num_fields)],
                 'formats':2*[np.int] + 2*[np.float] + 2*[np.int] + 2*[np.bool] + 3*[np.int]}
data = np.zeros(num, dtype=dtype)

# Being rather verbose...
data['col0'] = np.arange(num, dtype=np.int)
data['col1'] = int(ua) * np.ones(num)
data['col2'] = np.random.uniform(low_inc / 2, med_inc * 2, num)
data['col3'] = np.random.uniform(0, 6, num)
data['col4'] = np.random.randint(100, 5000, num)
data['col5'] = np.random.randint(100, 500, num)
data['col6'] = np.random.randint(0, 2, num).astype(np.bool)
data['col7'] = np.random.randint(0, 2, num).astype(np.bool)
data['col8'] = np.random.randint(100, 5000, num)
data['col9'] = np.random.randint(100, 5000, num)
data['col10'] = np.random.randint(100, 5000, num)

print data

Which yields a 100-element array with 11 fields:

array([ (0, 5, 2.0886534380436226, 3.0111285613794276, 3476, 117, False, False, 4704, 4372, 4062),
       (1, 5, 2.0977199579338115, 1.8687472941590277, 4635, 496, True, False, 4079, 4263, 3196),
       ...
       ...
       (98, 5, 1.1682309811443277, 1.4100766819689299, 1213, 135, False, False, 1250, 2534, 1160),
       (99, 5, 1.746554619056416, 5.210411489007637, 1387, 352, False, False, 3520, 3772, 3249)], 
      dtype=[('col0', '<i8'), ('col1', '<i8'), ('col2', '<f8'), ('col3', '<f8'), ('col4', '<i8'), ('col5', '<i8'), ('col6', '|b1'), ('col7', '|b1'), ('col8', '<i8'), ('col9', '<i8'), ('col10', '<i8')])
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Quoting the first line of chapter 1 of the NumPy reference:

NumPy provides an N-dimensional array type, the ndarray, which describes a collection of “items” of the same type.

So every member of the array has to be of the same type. The loss of generality here, as compared to regular Python lists, is the trade-off that allows high speed operations on arrays: loops can run without testing the type of each member.

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are there any alternatives to using an np.array? –  dassouki Sep 16 '10 at 14:33
1  
What exactly are you trying to do? I think of numpy as speeding up math: matrix multiplication, or taking the cosine of a whole bunch of inputs. Without knowing more about what you're doing, all I can suggest is a regular Python list. –  mtrw Sep 16 '10 at 14:38

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