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I define a path variable in Xcode source tree called "MY_SRC_DIR". I would like to get the value of this environment variable and put it in a NSString in the obj-c code. For example,

-(NSString*) getSourceDir

{

    return @"${MY_SRC_DIR}"; // not the right solution and this is the question

}
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4 Answers 4

From http://rosettacode.org/wiki/Environment_variables#Objective-C:

[[NSProcessInfo processInfo] environment] returns an NSDictionary of the current environment.

For example:

[[[NSProcessInfo processInfo] environment] objectForKey:@"MY_SRC_DIR"]
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4  
BUZZZ: Wrong answer; this method will return the environment variables at runtime. The question is about accessing an environment variable that exist at (Xcode) build time. –  geowar Feb 6 '13 at 20:11
6  
Perhaps the wrong answer for the OP's question, but the right answer for me! Thanks!! –  Chris Nolet Jun 30 '13 at 1:45
    
How can I view the values of those variables from Xcode? –  Vijay Nov 10 at 7:15

Here is another way to do it:

.xcconfig file:

FIRST_PRESIDENT = '@"Washington, George"'
GCC_PREPROCESSOR_DEFINITIONS = MACRO_FIRST_PRESIDENT=$(FIRST_PRESIDENT)

objective C code:

#ifdef FIRST_PRESIDENT
    NSLog(@"FIRST_PRESIDENT is defined");
#else
    NSLog(@"FIRST_PRESIDENT is NOT defined");
#endif
#ifdef MACRO_FIRST_PRESIDENT
    NSLog(@"MACRO_FIRST_PRESIDENT is %@", MACRO_FIRST_PRESIDENT);
#else
    NSLog(@"MACRO_FIRST_PRESIDENT is undefined, sorry!");
#endif

Console output -- I've stripped out the garbage from NSLog:

FIRST_PRESIDENT is NOT defined
MACRO_FIRST_PRESIDENT is Washington, George
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The only way I've found to get a build time environment variable as a string is to put it in an dictionary element like this:

<key>Product Name</key>
<string>$PRODUCT_NAME</string>

and then retrieve it like this:

NSDictionary* infoDict = [[NSBundle mainBundle] infoDictionary];
NSString* productName = infoDict[@"Product Name"];
NSLog(@"Product Name: %@", productName);
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This is a correct answer. It would be ideal to find a way to do it without the info dictionary. But is that possible? –  William Jockusch Apr 6 '13 at 16:39

The best answer to this question is the accepted answer on this question.

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/538996/constants-in-objective-c

You'll get the most mileage, and won't need any special methods to get the value you're searching for as long as you import the file into whatever .h/.m file is going to consume said value.

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+1 for the link you posted –  Pawan Kumar Sharma Dec 1 '12 at 11:39

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