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Which programming languge has the most mature speech recognition api?

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Programming languages don't "have" APIs. The APIs exist, and are then called from programs written in programming languages. What do you mean by this? –  John Saunders Sep 16 '10 at 17:05
    
Wouldn't it be better to ask for some mature speech recognition apis? You might also specify whether this is for deployment or research, and if it is for deployment on what platform. –  David Thornley Sep 16 '10 at 17:17
    
sorry for the wording but I think I got my point across –  CountCet Sep 16 '10 at 17:47
    
If so, only by accident. The accepted answer has approximately no usable information in it. –  David Thornley Sep 16 '10 at 18:00

3 Answers 3

Probably doesn't matter - the recognition library will likely be written in C and so can be called from almost anything.

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I don't think I'd call any speech recognition API "mature", but but I prefer the Managed Code Speech API, which comes free with .NET >= 3. So that means you can use any .NET language you like: C#, VB, C++.... even IronRuby

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The Microsoft Speech API is a fairly mature speech API. It's pretty neat because as long as your end-users are on a supported platform, they can get the benefits from the Speech API. And I'm pretty sure it's freely available.

It's available in managed .NET code as the Managed Code Speech API: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Speech_API#Managed_code_Speech_API

It's available in C/C++ (or really any language that can make COM calls) as Speech API 5: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Speech_API#SAPI_5_API_family

The MSDN link to the speech API: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms723627%28VS.85%29.aspx

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