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I renamed a table in my database with

EXEC sp_rename 'tblOldAndBusted', 'tblNewAndShiny'

and all the foreign key constraints were updated to the new table name, but they're still named based on the old table name. For example, I now have FK_tblOldAndBusted_tblTastyData but I'd like to have FK_tblNewAndShiny_tblTastyData.

Is there an easy way to script this?

Also, am I being too anal? I know the database works fine with the old table name in the constraints, but it feels like broken windows.

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3  
this is not anal, when you get a constraint error, it is nice to have the actual table name and column as part of the constraint name, so you can figure out the problem. if the constraint name has the wrong table name in it, that will just cause you some delay in figuring out the problem. –  KM. Sep 16 '10 at 17:46
    
That's not anal, that's penal. –  Denis Valeev Sep 16 '10 at 17:55
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5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Try:

exec sp_rename 'FK_tblOldAndBusted_tblTastyData', 'FK_tblNewAndShiny_tblTastyData', 'object'

Also, there is a bug regarding renaming such things when you deal with non-default schema.

Cannot rename a default constraint for a table in a schema which is not dbo by rsocol @Microsoft Connect

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If anyone is interested, I just had to rename all the default constraints for the an audit field named "EnteredDate"to a specific pattern. Update and replace as needed. I hope this helps and might be a starting point.

DECLARE @TableName VARCHAR(255), @ConstraintName VARCHAR(255)
DECLARE constraint_cursor CURSOR
    FOR 
        select b.name, c.name from 
        sys.all_columns a 
        inner join
        sys.tables b 
        on 
        a.object_id = b.object_id
        inner join
        sys.default_constraints c
        on a.default_object_id = c.object_id
        where 
            b.name <> 'sysdiagrams'
            and a.name = 'EnteredDate' -- column name
            and b.type = 'U'

OPEN constraint_cursor
FETCH NEXT FROM constraint_cursor INTO @TableName, @ConstraintName

WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
    BEGIN
        DECLARE @SqlScript VARCHAR(255) = ''
        SET @SqlScript = 'sp_rename ' + @ConstraintName + ', ''DF_' + @TableName + '_EnteredDate'', ''object'''
        EXEC(@SqlScript)
        SELECT @TableName, @ConstraintName, 'DF_' + @TableName + '_EnteredDate', @SqlScript 
        FETCH NEXT FROM constraint_cursor INTO @TableName, @ConstraintName
    END 
CLOSE constraint_cursor;
DEALLOCATE constraint_cursor;
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If there are too many to rename, how about export to dump, edit the dump in any text editor of choice to replace the table name, and then restore from dump? I mean export the dump of only constraints, not all.

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Interesting idea, but in my situation I have to create a script that can be used to make the same changes on other copies of the database. Incidentally, its less than 10 tables, so not a huge deal. –  Matt Casto Sep 16 '10 at 18:21
    
Ok. I had to use such method when one of my MySQL DB was migrated from Windows to Amazon RDS. We has all table names in upper case, while the DUMP we got from windows had all lower case. And on RDS, and under linux, MySQL table names are case sensitive. –  Ashish Patil Sep 17 '10 at 10:42
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After some more digging, I found that it actually has to be in this form:

EXEC sp_rename N'schema.MyIOldConstraint', N'MyNewConstraint', N'OBJECT'

Source

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Based user906573's script. Generate a script to rename all defaults in the database. Useful for correcting constraints that weren't explicitly named at create time.

 --
-- Generates a script to rename defaults to the pattern DF_tablename_columnname
--

DECLARE @TableName VARCHAR(255), @ConstraintName VARCHAR(255), @ColumnName varchar(255), @SchemaName varchar(255)
DECLARE constraint_cursor CURSOR
    FOR 
        select b.name, c.name, a.name, sc.name
        from sys.all_columns a 
        inner join sys.tables b on a.object_id = b.object_id
        join sys.schemas sc on b.schema_id = sc.schema_id
        inner join sys.default_constraints c on a.default_object_id = c.object_id
        where 
            b.name <> 'sysdiagrams'
            and b.type = 'U'

OPEN constraint_cursor
FETCH NEXT FROM constraint_cursor INTO @TableName, @ConstraintName, @ColumnName, @SchemaName

WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
    BEGIN
        DECLARE @SqlScript VARCHAR(255) = ''
        SET @SqlScript = 'sp_rename ''' + @SchemaName + '.' + @ConstraintName + ''', ''' + @SchemaName + '.DF_' + @TableName + '_' + @ColumnName + ''', ''object''' + char(13) + char(10) + 'GO' + char(13) + char(10)
        --EXEC(@SqlScript)
        print @sqlscript
        FETCH NEXT FROM constraint_cursor INTO @TableName, @ConstraintName, @ColumnName, @SchemaName
    END 
CLOSE constraint_cursor;
DEALLOCATE constraint_cursor;
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