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Using System.Move() to insert/delete item(s) from an array of string is not as easy as insert/delete it from other array of simple data types. The problem is ... string is reference counted in Delphi. Using Move() on reference-counted data types needs deeper knowledge on internal compiler behaviour.

Can someone here explain the needed steps for me to achieve that, or better with some snippet codes, or direct me to a good reference on the internet?

Oh, Please don't tell me to use the "lazy-but-slow way", that is, for loop, I know that.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I've demonstrated how to delete items from a dynamic array before:

In that article, I start with the following code:

type
  TXArray = array of X;

procedure DeleteX(var A: TXArray; const Index: Cardinal);
var
  ALength: Cardinal;
  i: Cardinal;
begin
  ALength := Length(A);
  Assert(ALength > 0);
  Assert(Index < ALength);
  for i := Index + 1 to ALength - 1 do
    A[i - 1] := A[i];
  SetLength(A, ALength - 1);
end;

You cannot go wrong with that code. Use whatever value for X you want; in your case, replace it with string. If you want to get fancier and use Move, then there's way to do that, too.

procedure DeleteX(var A: TXArray; const Index: Cardinal);
var
  ALength: Cardinal;
  TailElements: Cardinal;
begin
  ALength := Length(A);
  Assert(ALength > 0);
  Assert(Index < ALength);
  Finalize(A[Index]);
  TailElements := ALength - Index;
  if TailElements > 0 then
    Move(A[Index + 1], A[Index], SizeOf(X) * TailElements);
  Initialize(A[ALength - 1]);
  SetLength(A, ALength - 1);
end;

Since X is string, the Finalize call is equivalent to assigning the empty string to that array element. I use Finalize in this code, though, because it will work for all array-element types, even types that include records, interfaces, strings, and other arrays.

For inserting, you just shift things the opposite direction:

procedure InsertX(var A: TXArray; const Index: Cardinal; const Value: X);
var
  ALength: Cardinal;
  TailElements: Cardinal;
begin
  ALength := Length(A);
  Assert(Index <= ALength);
  SetLength(A, ALength + 1);
  Finalize(A[ALength]);
  TailElements := ALength - Index;
  if TailElements > 0 then begin
    Move(A[Index], A[Index + 1], SizeOf(X) * TailElements);
  Initialize(A[Index]);
  A[Index] := Value;
end;

Use Finalize when you're about to do something that's outside the bounds of the language, such as using the non-type-safe Move procedure to overwrite a variable of a compiler-managed type. Use Initialize when you're re-entering the defined part of the language. (The language defines what happens when an array grows or shrinks with SetLength, but it doesn't define how to copy or delete strings without using a string-assignment statement.)

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thank you very much. :-) I will try your snippet code, and will accept this as accepted answer if it succeeds. But I have to go to the office now. :-) –  Phantom Sep 17 '10 at 1:21
    
just a suggestion, or maybe a request, we will be happy if you please to update your mentioned article to also include insertion. I like your webpage design. –  Phantom Sep 18 '10 at 0:30
    
I modified Rob's code to provide a way of doing this using the newer TArray<T> construction. What do you think, Rob? Any problems I missed? –  jep Jul 31 '13 at 18:25

To insert a string, simply add a string (the lazy way) to the end of the array (which is an array of pointers), and then use Move to change the order of the elements of this array (of pointers).

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If I wanted to insert a string into the middle of a list of strings, I'd use TStringList.Insert. (It does it quickly using System.Move.)

Any particular reason why you're using an array instead of a TStringList?

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For performance reason because my array would be possible to be filled with huge amount of items. I realize that TStringList.Capacity will help, but TStringList will still do unnecessary checking--according to the documentation-- "... assigning a value smaller than Count removes strings from the end of the list. Assigning a value greater than Count allocates space for more strings to be added." In my case, I don't need such a check. –  Phantom Sep 16 '10 at 21:25
    
@Phantom: Well, as long as you measure the actual overhead of the TStringList approach. Many people are surprisingly tolerant to delays of a few milliseconds. –  Andreas Rejbrand Sep 16 '10 at 21:28
4  
@Phantom: Fair enough, but there are other performance implications to take into account. For example, if you have to fill your array with a huge number of strings, are you using SetLength(MyArray, length(MyArray) + 1) every time? That's a huge number of reallocs and copies, and it can really drag performance down. To head this issue off, you have to allocate more space than you're using, so you need something to keep track of capacity and current count. To manage that, you should encapsulate it within an object... and then you're well on the road to reinventing the TStringList. :P –  Mason Wheeler Sep 16 '10 at 21:30
    
Yes, Mason is absolutely right. The example in his comment is one of the most common and severe Delphi performance issues. But, @Phantom, since you are talking about Move, I'd guess that you already are aware of this issue. –  Andreas Rejbrand Sep 16 '10 at 21:35
    
@Mason, No, I will allocate memory, just said, for 16384 items, and will allocate more 16384 if it is apparently needed. –  Phantom Sep 16 '10 at 21:37

Call UniqueString() on it, before messing with it.

http://docwiki.embarcadero.com/VCL/en/System.UniqueString

Then you have a string with a single reference.

Fat chance that that is what delete and insert do too, and I doubt you'll be faster.

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thanks, I will also experiment with this stuff as you told. –  Phantom Sep 16 '10 at 22:12
2  
"Fat chance" means something is unlikely. For example: "Do you think our boss will give us a bonus this year?" "Fat chance!" Calling UniqueString is exactly what Delete and Insert will do when changing the character contents of a string. There's no need to call it when changing the element contents of a dynamic array, though. –  Rob Kennedy Sep 16 '10 at 22:59
    
Oops, expressions are always pain in foreign languages :-) Anyway, I missed the "array of" bit. Then just finalizing the deleted bits and initializing the non deleted bits (or filling them with zero) would do –  Marco van de Voort Sep 17 '10 at 8:52

Just wanting to add this for any people that come here in the future.

Modifying Rob's code, I came up with this way of doing it that uses the newer TArray<T> type constructions.

type
  TArrayExt = class(TArray)
    class procedure Delete<T>(var A: TArray<T>; const Index: Cardinal; Count: Cardinal = 1);
  end;

implementation

class procedure TArrayExt.Delete<T>(var A: TArray<T>; const Index: Cardinal;
    Count: Cardinal = 1);
var
  ALength: Cardinal;
  i: Cardinal;
begin
  ALength := Length(A);
  Assert(ALength > 0);
  Assert(Count > 0);
  Assert(Count <= ALength - Index);
  Assert(Index < ALength);

  for i := Index + Count to ALength - 1 do
    A[i - Count] := A[i];

  SetLength(A, ALength - Count);
end;

A similar thing can be done for the insert.

(Not looking for this to get marked as the answer, just looking to provide an example that was too long to fit in the comments on Rob's excellent answer.)

(Fixed to address Rob's comments below.)

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1  
You attempted to make too many changes at once. Making my code use generic TArray would have been fine, but you decided to add another feature, and in doing so, you broke the whole thing. I don't think there's any input that makes this function work. –  Rob Kennedy Jul 31 '13 at 19:00
    
Do you have anything more specific to say than that? I actually fixed the one error that I believe is there (I had my 0/1 transposed on the if Index = 0 then conditional). I'm actually using it right now and it's seemingly working fine. If there's an error, it's definitely not very obvious at debug/runtime. Constructive criticism welcome. –  jep Jul 31 '13 at 22:17
    
Can you explain how this addresses the question of "Using Move() to insert/delete items from a dynamic array of string"? I see an iterative loop that has nothing to do with using Move whatsover, doesn't address a dynamic array of string (a generic TArray<string> is not a dynamic array of string), and the question specifically asks not to use a loop, because the poster already knows how to do so. IOW, this has absolutely zero pertinence to the question asked here; posting random non-related answers to questions isn't really how SO works. –  Ken White Jul 31 '13 at 22:39
    
Transposing didn't help. Any time Index is nonzero, you end up writing to A[-1]. The first spot you write to should always be A[Index]. Look at my code. Why is the starting index ever conditional in the first place? You could get closer to your intended feature set by going back to my code and replacing each occurrence of 1 with Count. –  Rob Kennedy Aug 1 '13 at 1:20
    
Thanks, that was more constructive. Actually, it was mainly looking at my code after a night's sleep and going "wait, why did I write THAT?" I have no idea at this point but the answer was pretty obvious. I've went through several rounds of pen and paper walkthroughs, so I'm confident that it's right at this point. –  jep Aug 1 '13 at 14:20

If you use System.Move to put items into an array of string, you should be aware that the strings that where there before the Move (and now overwritten), had a reference count of either -1 for constant strings, or > 0 for variable strings. Constant strings should not be altered, but variable strings should be treated accordingly: You should manually lower their reference-count (before they're overwritten!). To do that, you should try something like this:

Dec(PStrRec(IntPtr(SomeString)-12).refCnt);

But if the reference-count reached zero, you should also finalize the associated memory - something Delphi itself does a whole lot better if you let it work it's compiler-magic for strings. Oh, and also : if the strings you're copying come from the same array as your writing into, the needed administration becomes very cumbersome, very quickly!

So if it's in some way possible to avoid all this manual housekeeping, I would advise to let Delphi handle it itself.

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@PatrickvL: So, do you still recommend me to use TStringList even if for my case, that is, the array will be filled with all files in all hard-drives attached to a computer. Will TStringList be fast enough? –  Phantom Sep 16 '10 at 21:51
1  
@Phantom: TStringList was designed for handling large numbers of strings. If you have Delphi you've got Classes.pas; browse through the code to TStringList and TStrings and see how many bits of code you can find that are there specifically for performance reasons. It's one of the most used classes in the entire RTL, and it's been tested extensively for 15 years now. You'd have to work pretty hard to come up with any solution that's noticeably faster than TStringList at string handling. If you want to know if it's slow, try using it and see if it feels slow or not. –  Mason Wheeler Sep 16 '10 at 22:03
    
@Mason, I will try it. –  Phantom Sep 16 '10 at 22:10
2  
-1 for suggesting manual modification of internal, implementation-defined data structures. You could have just assigned SomeString := '' and let the compiler take care of the zero-reference-count situation, as well as thread-safety. –  Rob Kennedy Sep 16 '10 at 22:39
2  
@Rob : I was just answering Phantom's question how to decrease a reference count manually. I believe that's a valid question to answer - even when it's not advisable to do so! (Didn't I mention that in my last statement?) Sure, setting Somestring := '' works too, but that relies on compiler magic again, so my answer has some credibility, don't you think? –  PatrickvL Sep 17 '10 at 10:10

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