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I am trying to make a function that will draw a circle out of periods with only being given a starting x and y and a radius. Is it possible?
I would like to have the full code for it will an explanation for how it works; I've been trying this for 1 year now and I still can't fathom how it may be done.

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closed as not a real question by Antal S-Z, Kev Sep 5 '12 at 21:46

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Darn <500 rep! Anyways, [plz-send-me-teh-codez]. –  Hello71 Sep 16 '10 at 21:41
    
Should the circle be completely filled with periods, or do you only want the circumference? If it's just the circumference, does it all need to be text in a single div, or could you use any wacky combination of html elements? –  Dave Aaron Smith Sep 16 '10 at 21:45
    
no, i just need the outer ring. and if you need to, just make a bunch of document.writes haha, just as long as it would make a circle, it does not matter if it is inside a div –  Michael Sep 16 '10 at 22:15
1  
This would make for a nifty game of code golf. Perhaps a bit too simple, though. –  Jeff Sep 16 '10 at 23:44
    
This sounds more like a homework problem to me. –  ashicus Sep 17 '10 at 6:12

6 Answers 6

Here's the maths and even an example program in C:

http://pixwiki.bafsoft.com/mags/5/articles/circle/sincos.htm (link no longer exists).

And position: absolute, left and top will let you draw:

http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS2/visuren.html#choose-position

Any further questions?

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3  
+1 Nice to see an answer that nudges the OP in the right direction, as opposed to a copy/paste solution that they will not learn as much from –  Josh Stodola Sep 16 '10 at 21:51
    
This doesn't answer the question at all. @Michael is essentially asking an ascii art problem and @Matti is answering in c and pixels. This is boring and off topic. –  Dave Aaron Smith Sep 16 '10 at 21:57
4  
@Dave: Periods sort of look like pixels, don't they? And if you had actually taken a look at the C code, the syntax is almost identical to JS, and should be quite understandable. –  Matti Virkkunen Sep 16 '10 at 21:59
    
@Matti, haha, I don't know where to start. I'll bury the fork at void draw_circle () { int x, y; looks nothing like Javascript. –  Dave Aaron Smith Sep 16 '10 at 22:11
4  
@Dave: void draw_circle() { int x, y; is not dramatically different from function draw_circle() { var x, y;. The only difference is that the C declares types. –  Chuck Sep 16 '10 at 23:13

I know you asked for just the circumference, but it seemed easier to do a filled circle.

<html>
  <head>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="http://www.google.com/jsapi"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript">
      google.load("jquery", "1");
    </script>
  </head>
  <body>
    <script type="text/javascript">
      function drawCircle(left, top, radius) {
        var pre = $("<pre/>").css({position: "absolute", top: top, left: left}).appendTo($("body"));
        var testSpan = $("<span> </span>").appendTo(pre);
        var cellWidth = testSpan.width();
        var cellHeight = testSpan.height();
        testSpan.remove();
        var diameter = 2 * radius;
        var dotArray = [];
        for (var row = 0; row <= diameter / cellHeight; row++) {
          for (var column = 0; column <= diameter / cellWidth; column++) {
            var cellDY = Math.abs(row * cellHeight - radius) - cellHeight / 2;
            var cellDX = Math.abs(column * cellWidth - radius) - cellWidth / 2;
            var distance = Math.pow(cellDY, 2) + Math.pow(cellDX, 2);
            if (distance < Math.pow(radius, 2)) {
              dotArray.push(".");
            } else {
              dotArray.push(" ");
            }
          }
          dotArray.push("<br/>");
        }
        pre.html(dotArray.join(""));
      }
      drawCircle(20, 20, 200);
  </script> 
  </body>
</html>
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Let me know which parts you'd like me to explain and I can elucidate. Good, fun question! –  Dave Aaron Smith Sep 16 '10 at 23:00
    
Alright, I know you guys don't like the question in the first place, hence the downvote. Honestly though, this is the only working code on the page that does what @Michael asked. It's really quite clever if I do say so myself. Give it a go. –  Dave Aaron Smith Sep 16 '10 at 23:11
    
Downvotes without comment are lame. –  Chuck Sep 16 '10 at 23:14
1  
Maybe the downvoter didn't like your answer because it's copy-pasteable. –  Matti Virkkunen Sep 16 '10 at 23:15
    
getting closer... but i said NO FILL, and it needs to look more like a circle than that haha but its pretty good –  Michael Sep 17 '10 at 0:06

Yes, it is possible. Put the below code into an html file to see it in action.

A quick run through: The code generates an array of dots and spaces. It chooses to make a dot based on if the distance from the current x, y position to the center of the circle is less than or equal to the length of the radius via the distance formula ( http://www.purplemath.com/modules/distform.htm ).

<div id= "mydiv" style="font-family: monospace"> </div> 

<script type="text/javascript"> 
    var x = 2; //starting x,y position of circle
    var y = 5; 
    var rad = 4; //radius of circle

    var width = 10; //width and height of display
    var height = 10;

    var dotArray = "";

    for (var i=0;i<width;i++){
        for (var j=0;j<height;j++){
            if (Math.sqrt( Math.pow(i-y, 2) + Math.pow(j-x, 2)) <= rad){
                dotArray += (".");
            } else {
                dotArray += ("&nbsp;");
            }
        }
        dotArray += "<br \>";
    }

document.getElementById('mydiv').innerHTML = dotArray;
</script> 
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This is only drawing half circles at best for me in Firefox 3. –  Dave Aaron Smith Sep 16 '10 at 22:01
    
in chrome this does nothing except make a few lines of . nothing at all like a circle, what browser are u using, i need this to work fro chrome only. –  Michael Sep 16 '10 at 22:17
    
You need to style it with white-space: pre as well. –  Chuck Sep 16 '10 at 23:11
    
Sorry; I had a slight glitch (replaced " " with "&nbsp;"). It now works correctly in Chrome (and probably other browsers as well). –  thedayturns Sep 17 '10 at 4:39
<script type="text/javascript">
var e=0;
function a() {
    if(e<=7200){
        var f = (180-e)/2;
        var g = 90-e;
        var h = f-g;
        var j = Math.sin(g)*300;
        var n = Math.cos(g)*300;
        var m = 300-j;
        var newX = 900-m;
        var newY = 300+n;
        document.write("<p class=lol style=position:absolute;left:"+newX+";top:"+newY+">.</p>");
        e++;
    }
}

setInterval("a()", 1);
</script>
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uh how do you make it in code like u guys did, it didnt show the whole thing –  Michael Sep 17 '10 at 5:50
    
<script type="text/javascript"> var e=0; function a() { if(e<=7200){ var f = (180-e)/2; var g = 90-e; var h = f-g; var j = Math.sin(g)*300; var n = Math.cos(g)*300; var m = 300-j; var newX = 900-m; var newY = 300+n; document.write("<p class=lol style=position:absolute;left:"+newX+";top:"+newY+">.</p>"); e++; } } setInterval("a()", 1); </script> –  Michael Sep 17 '10 at 5:57
    
Read the "How to Format" help on the right hand side when editing... –  deceze Sep 17 '10 at 5:58
    
@Michael There's a help document. You click the code button, just to the right of the blockquote button you were already using –  Michael Mrozek Sep 17 '10 at 6:00
    
This did not work in IE for me, but it did work in Chrome! –  Josh Stodola Sep 17 '10 at 11:12
<script type="text/javascript">
var e=0;
function a() {
    if(e<=7200){
        var f = (180-e)/2;
        var g = 90-e;
        var h = f-g;
        var j = Math.sin(g)*300;
        var n = Math.cos(g)*300;
        var m = 300-j;
        var newX = 900-m;
        var newY = 300+n;
        document.write("<p class='lol' style='position:absolute;left:"+newX+";top:"+newY+"'>.</p>");
        e++;
        a();
    }
}
a();

</script>
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You are looking for Bresenham's circle algorithm.

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