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I mean would it be bad practice if I want an if statement to have an else, but there is a nested if statement "in my way" so I use a blank else statement such as "else ;" or "else { }" to escape it?

ex:

if (lsvAddons.SelectedItems.Count > 0)
    foreach (ListViewItem A in lsvAddons.SelectedItems)
        if (Addons[A.Index] != null) Addons[A.Index].DoHelp();
        else { }
else Console.WriteLine(_GenericHelpString);

vs:

if (lsvAddons.SelectedItems.Count > 0)
{
    foreach (ListViewItem A in lsvAddons.SelectedItems)
        if (Addons[A.Index] != null) Addons[A.Index].DoHelp();
}
else Console.WriteLine(_GenericHelpString);

Or even:

if (lsvAddons.SelectedItems.Count > 0)
{
    foreach (ListViewItem A in lsvAddons.SelectedItems)
    {
        if (Addons[A.Index] != null) 
        { 
            Addons[A.Index].DoHelp();
        }
    }
}
else
{
    Console.WriteLine(_GenericHelpString)
}
share|improve this question
1  
What's your question? – klabranche Sep 16 '10 at 21:52
    
My question is in the title, and explanation is in the post. But I just cleaned it up a little for those who forget easily ;) – Blam Sep 16 '10 at 21:53
3  
If you do not need to write an else statement, simply leave it out... if I see an empty else statement when viewing someone else's code the first thing that comes to mind is that this guy might have left a piece of his code out. – npinti Sep 16 '10 at 21:56
    
Gotcha now @Blam..... – klabranche Sep 16 '10 at 22:01
1  
This question is subjective and argumentative. Please vote to close. – Timwi Sep 16 '10 at 22:10
up vote 22 down vote accepted

Braces are your friend.

You'll be ahead of the curve if you resist the urge to omit braces. The third form is completely unambiguous, easier to read, and will help you avoid inadvertant errors. I don't know about you, but I can understand the behavior of the third form right away .. the first two forms require more thinking and mental parsing to get right.

Many developers try to get rid of braces and use the implicit form of if statements. Unfortunately, what do you do when you run across something like:

if( someCondition... )
    DoSomething();
    DoAnotherThing();

Did the developer simply indent incorrectly? Or was the intent to have both methods part of the same condition? It can be hard to tell after the fact ... and is a leading source of defects. Here's an even worse example:

if( someCondition );
    DoSomething();
    DoAnotherThing();

Do you notice the subtle mistake here?

You're much better off in the long run if you make your code unambigous and less prones to these kinds of problems.

Often developers argue to omit braces so that their code is shorter and easier to understand. Now, there's certainly merit to avoiding long methods (some even argue that methods should always be 1-screen long) ... but I don't think the risk introduced by this kind of brevity is generally worth the reward. Keep in mind, there are ways to restructure methods to avoid excessive nesting - and they often gain you more in readability than omitting braces do.

My personal mantra is:

  1. Make it correct.
  2. Make it clear.
  3. Make it concise.
  4. Make it fast ... in that order.
share|improve this answer
    
I just can't help but think that the larger the block of code in my class files the more difficult to understand it will initially seem to people reading it, even if it is spaced out. – Blam Sep 16 '10 at 21:56
    
Also wondering what your thoughts are on same line, aka: else Console.WriteLine(_GenericHelpString); – Blam Sep 16 '10 at 21:58
4  
+1 for the mantra – Larsenal Sep 16 '10 at 22:02
1  
@Blam: It's the same thing. Don't omit the braces. I've seen many defects that resulted from developers misunderstanding the intended scoping or cohesion of statements. Trust me ... those extra two characters will save your trouble in the long run. – LBushkin Sep 16 '10 at 22:03
1  
@LBushkin: Yes, they are. Using the wrong tool is a bad habit. Using a good tool is a good habit. Furthermore, in my 5 years of using Visual Studio I have never seen the autoformatting feature mis-indent a statement after an if in the way you describe. @Blam: If your tool gets the indentation wrong and thus confuses you, then you are using the wrong tool for programming. – Timwi Sep 16 '10 at 22:09

An empty code block is bad practice.

else { }
share|improve this answer

Does the empty else make your code more readable? No, but the braces do.

share|improve this answer

Use the third formatting.

if (lsvAddons.SelectedItems.Count > 0)
{
    foreach (ListViewItem A in lsvAddons.SelectedItems)
    {
        if (Addons[A.Index] != null) 
        { 
            Addons[A.Index].DoHelp();
        }
    }
}
else
{
    Console.WriteLine(_GenericHelpString)
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I can only second those guys saying the third one is the formatting I would also prefer. – Jim Brissom Sep 16 '10 at 21:55
1  
Although the second one isn't too bad. In my opinion, anything except the first. – luiscubal Sep 16 '10 at 22:00
1  
The third one looks like it was invented by people paid for by lines. I much prefer the second one. – romkyns Sep 16 '10 at 22:07

If you're asking which is nicer, cleaner code, then the last one!

I have no idea why developers strive so hard to condense their code into increasingly baffling forms. The extra brackets may not tell the compiler anything different, but that is only half the battle of good coding. Make it legible and your colleagues and the users of the software will thank you for fewer bugs down the line!

share|improve this answer

Your second version is "best practice". ReSharper will complain about the empty code block, and it's generally better to use fewer keywords than more. Yes, version two takes up more whitespace, but that's not necessarily a bad thing, and it has fewer non-whitespace chars.

share|improve this answer

Excessive braces are unnecessary and annoying.

I don’t mind braces, and I think if you have several levels of nesting, you should use them even if there is only one statement. But you shouldn’t religiously use them all the time.

For something very simple like

if (some_condition)
    Console.WriteLine("some info");

using braces would be completely over the top, and would make it much harder to see the bigger picture of the surrounding code (because you can fit less of it on the screen).

share|improve this answer

Use curly brackets ({ and }) to specify to which if your else belongs. By default, it belongs to the if closest to it in the same scope (the curly brackets). Using brackets also improves readability for you in the future and other developers which might read it.

So, use your second formatting to solve you problem.

if (lsvAddons.SelectedItems.Count > 0)
{
    foreach (ListViewItem A in lsvAddons.SelectedItems)
        if (Addons[A.Index] != null) Addons[A.Index].DoHelp();
}
else Console.WriteLine(_GenericHelpString);

However, I would prefer the third example you gave, for readability.

share|improve this answer
    
I think he knows that, which is why in the first example he is putting a blank else to make it clear which if they belong to – Fiona - myaccessible.website Sep 16 '10 at 21:55
    
@Fiona He hadn't explained the question when I started answering. I've updated my answer now. – Virtlink Sep 16 '10 at 21:57
    
Have you used Visual Studio before? It indents the code automatically and correctly so it always shows which if an else belongs to. – Timwi Sep 16 '10 at 22:07

It took me a while to understand what everything belongs to in the first example, so I'd say it's bad practice.

Personally I

  1. Never ever nest braceless control structures because it can be very hard to read.
  2. Use braces on either both the if and else, or neither.

So I'd format it as follows:

if (lsvAddons.SelectedItems.Count > 0)
{
    foreach (ListViewItem A in lsvAddons.SelectedItems)
    {
        if (Addons[A.Index] != null) 
            Addons[A.Index].DoHelp();
    }
}
else
{
    Console.WriteLine(_GenericHelpString)
}
share|improve this answer

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