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When you're using a factory pattern, how do you inject dependencies into constructors at runtime?

I'm building Foos with different formats - boolean, array, freetext, matrix, etc. That format list will grow as we find different uses for Foo. Here's my basic core domain:

public interface IFoo
{
    FooFormat Format { get; }
}

public class Foo : IFoo
{
    private FooFormat _format;

    internal Foo(FooFormat format)
    {
        _format = format;
    }

    public FooFormat Format { get { return _format; } }
}


public abstract class FooFormat
{
}

public class DefaultFooFormat : FooFormat
{
}

public class BooleanFooFormat : FooFormat
{
    public IList<bool> Values { get; set; }
}

public class ArrayFooFormat : FooFormat
{
    private IList<string> _values;

    public ArrayFooFormat(IList<string> values)
    {
        _values = values;
    }

    public IList<string> Values { get { return _values; } }
}

IFoo is decorated for the consumer context:

public abstract class FooDecorator : IFoo
{
    private IFoo _foo;

    protected FooDecorator(IFoo foo)
    {
        _foo = foo;
    }

    public FooFormat Format
    {
        get { return _foo.Format; }
    }

    protected IFoo foo
    {
        get { return _foo; }
    }
}

I don't want my consumer to instantiate a Foo directly, so I force them to use a factory:

public abstract class FooFactory
{
    protected IFoo Build<T>()
    {
        FooFormat format = GetFormat<T>();
        return new Foo(format);
    }

    private FooFormat GetFormat<T>()
    {
        if (typeof(T) == typeof(ArrayFooFormat)) return new ArrayFooFormat(new List<string>());
        if (typeof(T) == typeof(BooleanFooFormat)) return new BooleanFooFormat();
        return new DefaultFooFormat();
    }
}

And even then, they need to derive a factory from my abstract factory for their particular context.

I'm specifically building foos in an html context, like so:

public class HtmlFoo : FooDecorator
{
    public HtmlFoo(IFoo foo) : base(foo) { }

    public string ToHtml()
    {
        return "<div>" + this.Format.ToString() + "</div>";
    }
}


public class HtmlFooFactory : FooFactory
{
    public IFoo BuildFoo<T>()
    {
        IFoo foo = Build<T>();
        return new HtmlFoo(foo);
    }
}

public class HtmlFooConsumer
{
    public void DoSomeFoo()
    {
        var factory = new HtmlFooFactory();
        var htmlBooleanFoo = factory.BuildFoo<BooleanFooFormat>();
        var htmlArrayFoo = factory.BuildFoo<ArrayFooFormat>();
    }
}

My problem is in my abstract FooFactory: I'm always injecting an empty value list into my ArrayFooFormat. I want to be able to pass in a value list from the consumer. For other FooFormats, I want to pass in the right constructor arguments from the consumer. But I want to keep the public API dead simple - I don't want a bunch of overloads on BuildFoo().

So how do I pass a custom value list into the factory.BuildFoo<T>() call from inside HtmlFooConsumer.DoSomeFoo()? Any ideas, stackoverflow gurus?

share|improve this question
    
in questions as complicated as this it really helps to have a more real example - rather than a bunch of Foo-ey. –  Bryan Dec 17 '08 at 15:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Maybe you can do something along these lines where your abstract FooFormat becomes IFooFormat and a generic FooFormat provides an Init method that gets passed the parameter.

Then a single overload of Build lets you pass in the parameter.

public interface IFooFormat
{
}

public class FooFormat<TValue> : IFooFormat
{
    private TValue _value;

    public void Init(TValue value)
    {
        _value = value;
    }

    public TValue Value
    {
        get { return _value; }
    }
}

public class ArrayFooFormat : FooFormat<IList<string>> { }

public class BooleanFooFormat : FooFormat<bool> { }

public class DefaultFooFormat : IFooFormat { }

public interface IFoo { }

public class Foo : IFoo
{
    private IFooFormat _format;

    internal Foo(IFooFormat format)
    {
        _format = format;
    }

    public IFooFormat Format { get { return _format; } }
}

public class FooFactory
{
    protected IFoo Build<TFormat, TArg>(TArg arg) where TFormat : FooFormat<TArg>, new()
    {
        TFormat format = new TFormat();
        format.Init(arg);
        return new Foo(format);
    }

    protected IFoo Build<TFormat>() where TFormat : IFooFormat, new()
    {
        return new Foo(new TFormat());
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent, Andrew. I tried this out, and I like the results. I am sacrificing a bit of discoverability in the public API since the consumer has to know what TArg is ahead of time. But I think it's a good trade off for flexibility. –  dalesmithtx Dec 18 '08 at 13:49
    
I'm glad you like it :] –  Andrew Kennan Dec 18 '08 at 14:15

A factory is basically the object oriented version of a static variable. I'd avoid using one alltogether. Instead of forcing clients to use a factory, perhaps you can simply inject objects into their constructors, sidestepping the need for a factory.

share|improve this answer
1  
I'm not sure what you mean by "the object oriented version of a static variable." I'm forcing factory usage to ensure that clients cannot build Foos directly, but instead get IFoos built the way they are supposed to be built. Reliance on IFoo rather than Foo enforces dependency inversion. –  dalesmithtx Dec 18 '08 at 13:46

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