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I don't know where error information goes when a trigger doesn't work correctly.

My tool for writing triggers has been Oracle's Sql Developer tool, and my knowledge of how to debug it is pretty much nonexistent. What are some pointers for being able to find useful information about things happening "behind the scenes"? Also, are there better tools that Sql Developer for connecting, testing, debugging, etc?

My method so far has been to write something (a trigger, for instance), test it with single inserts/deletes, and then hope it works from them on. Are there better ways to make sure it's doing exactly what you want? For instance, with a select statement, is there anyway to see (in a debug state or something) each level of the select and how it whittles down results? Any tips greatly appreciated.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Firstly, all code works correctly. It just doesn't do what you expected it to do.

Secondly, "Don't start from here", or specifically don't use triggers. It is basically going to force switching to row-level processing if triggers are going to fire for each row. Better to actually put the logic in a stored procedure which you call. You've then got a start (where you validate inputs) and an end and a logic path all the way through. They are a lot easier to debug as you follow one path.

Three, Never test for an error you don't know how to handle. If you don't catch it, it bubbles up to the client who gets an error report saying what went wrong (error message) and where (ie the error/call stack). If you try to catch it, you have to know what to do with it (and if you don't know the tendency is to ignore it - which is BAD).

Finally, you can't readily see each 'layer' of a select. The explain plan will generally tell you how its going about things. v$session_longops MAY indicate what it is currently doing. The current wait event MAY give clues as to what table/block/row it is currently working on.

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+1 for mentioning explain plan, and +1 for "all code works correctly" :) –  Jeffrey Kemp Sep 17 '10 at 2:54
    
I didn't give quite enough info in my original. I wrote a trigger that worked on single inserts but not multiple, I think because of a deadlock issue. I think I fixed that problem, but while it was going on it was a "silent error'. Is there a log or something I can find info like that in? Another follow-up: how would a stored procedure end up different than a trigger? Let's say I have one table that an external source is putting data in, and another table I want to put data in based on that first table, and keep it updated with current data. How is stored procedure > trigger there? –  Nathan Spears Sep 17 '10 at 5:02
    
There are no silent errors. Either it errors, fails and rolls back. Or it succeeds but, quite possibly, does what you've told it to do not what you want it to do. Because row-level triggers fire during the course of an SQL statement there are read consistency issues which often lead to complex and error-prone workarounds. –  Gary Myers Sep 17 '10 at 22:03

A rough-and-ready simple method if you must debug triggers is to use DBMS_OUTPUT.

e.g.

SQL> CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER mytrigger
     BEFORE UPDATE ON mytable
     FOR EACH ROW
     ...
     BEGIN
       DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line('mytrigger STARTING');
       ... do some logic ...
       DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line('old=' || :OLD.mycolumn);
       DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line('new=' || :NEW.mycolumn);
       DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line('mytrigger FINISHED');
     END;
     /

SQL> SET SERVEROUT ON
SQL> UPDATE mytable SET mycolumn = mycolumn + 1;
2 rows updated.

mytrigger STARTING
old=10
new=11
mytrigger FINISHED
mytrigger STARTING
old=20
new=21
mytrigger FINISHED
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Good info, thanks. –  Nathan Spears Sep 17 '10 at 4:58

Application I use a program from Quest called TOAD available at www.quest.com/toad/toad-for-oracle.aspx.

As mentioned above, DBMS_OUTPUT is very handy. In your editor, make sure you enable the Output window.

PL/SQL works on "blocks" of code and you can catch it with an EXCEPTION keyword.

(Please forgive my formatting, not sure how to format for web)

DECLARE
    C_DATE_FORMAT VARCHAR2(20) := 'DD-Mon-YYYY';
    C_TIME_FORMAT VARCHAR2(20) := 'HH24:MI:SS';
    C_NOT_IMPLEMENTED_CODE CONSTANT NUMBER(5) := -20200;
    C_NOT_IMPLEMENTED_MESSAGE CONSTANT VARCHAR2(255) := 'Not implemented';
    not_implemented EXCEPTION; -- user defined exception
BEGIN
    --RAISE not_implemented; -- raise user defined exception
    RAISE_APPLICATION_ERROR(C_NOT_IMPLEMENTED_CODE, C_NOT_IMPLEMENTED_MESSAGE); -- user defined exception
EXCEPTION -- exception block
    WHEN not_implemented THEN -- catch not_implemented exception
        DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('Error: Not implemented');
    WHEN OTHERS THEN -- catch all other exceptions
        DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('Error occured.');
        DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('Date: ' || TO_CHAR(SYSDATE, C_DATE_FORMAT));
        DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('Time: ' || TO_CHAR(SYSDATE, C_TIME_FORMAT));
        DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('Error code: ' || SQLCODE);
        DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('Error message: ' || SQLERRM); --deal with error
        RAISE; -- raise to calling object
END;
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