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How do I check to see if a column exists in a SqlDataReader object? In my data access layer, I have create a method that builds the same object for multiple stored procedures calls. One of the stored procedures has an additional column that is not used by the other stored procedures. I want to modified the method to accommodate for every scenario.

My application is written in C#.

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possible duplicate of Detecting if an IDataReader contains a certain field before iteration –  nawfal Dec 12 '13 at 13:05

18 Answers 18

up vote 162 down vote accepted

In the accepted answer, using Exceptions for control logic is considered bad practice and has performance costs.

Looping through the fields can have a small performance hit if you use it a lot and you may want to consider caching the results

The more appropriate way to do this is:

public static class DataRecordExtensions
{
    public static bool HasColumn(this IDataRecord dr, string columnName)
    {
        for (int i=0; i < dr.FieldCount; i++)
        {
            if (dr.GetName(i).Equals(columnName, StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase))
                return true;
        }
        return false;
    }
}
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6  
Thank you for a solution that makes a lot of sense, I could not bring myself to beleive the catching a exception is the best way to find if a column does exist. –  Rihan Meij May 20 '09 at 15:30
    
Same here - I was like eh? catch the exception? –  Andrew Harry Jul 21 '09 at 4:26
3  
Great solution! Just so you know there is an extra ) at the end if the if statement in the above code. –  Stuck Apr 5 '11 at 8:27

It's much better to use this boolean function:

r.GetSchemaTable().Columns.Contains(field)

One call - no exceptions. It might throw exceptions internally, but I don't think so.

NOTE: In the comments below, we figured this out... the correct code is actually this:

public static bool HasColumn(DbDataReader Reader, string ColumnName) { 
    foreach (DataRow row in Reader.GetSchemaTable().Rows) { 
        if (row["ColumnName"].ToString() == ColumnName) 
            return true; 
    } //Still here? Column not found. 
    return false; 
}
share|improve this answer
5  
@Jasmine: I spoke too soon! Your code checks for a column in the schema table, not your result set. You need to compare "field" (assuming "field" is the column name) to the value of each row's "ColumnName" field. Break when you find it, return false if you don't. –  Steve J Jun 15 '09 at 21:46
4  
@Steve J: When would the resultset NOT have a column in the GetSchemaTable? –  Bless Yahu Aug 7 '09 at 16:13
1  
@Jasmine @Steve So does this method work at all? –  bzlm Apr 8 '10 at 6:39
1  
To anyone else confused, THIS DOES NOT WORK. See The answer below about retrieving the ColumnName row from the schema table and using it. –  Jason Jackson Dec 17 '12 at 17:30
2  
Yes, this DOES NOT WORK. Who upvoted it so many times??? It would've saved me a lot of debugging time later if this answer wasn't here! –  c00000fd Apr 15 '13 at 10:11

I think your best bet is to call GetOrdinal("columnName") on your DataReader up front, and catch an IndexOutOfRangeException in case the column isn't present.

In fact, let's make an extension method:

public static bool HasColumn(this IDataRecord r, string columnName)
{
    try
    {
        return r.GetOrdinal(columnName) >= 0;
    }
    catch (IndexOutOfRangeException)
    {
        return false;
    }
}

Edit

Ok, this post is starting to garner a few down-votes lately, and I can't delete it because it's the accepted answer, so I'm going to update it and (I hope) try to justify the use of exception handling as control flow.

The other way of achieving this, as posted by Chad Grant, is to loop through each field in the DataReader and do a case-insensitive comparison for the field name you're looking for. This will work really well, and truthfully will probably perform better than my method above. Certainly I would never use the method above inside a loop where performace was an issue.

I can think of one situation in which the try/GetOrdinal/catch method will work where the loop doesn't. It is, however, a completely hypothetical situation right now so it's a very flimsy justification. Regardless, bear with me and see what you think.

Imagine a database that allowed you to "alias" columns within a table. Imagine that I could define a table with a column called "EmployeeName" but also give it an alias of "EmpName", and doing a select for either name would return the data in that column. With me so far?

Now imagine that there's an ADO.NET provider for that database, and they've coded up an IDataReader implementation for it which takes column aliases into account.

Now, dr.GetName(i) (as used in Chad's answer) can only return a single string, so it has to return only one of the "aliases" on a column. However, GetOrdinal("EmpName") could use the internal implementation of this provider's fields to check each column's alias for the name you're looking for.

In this hypothetical "aliased columns" situation, the try/GetOrdinal/catch method would be the only way to be sure that you're checking for every variation of a column's name in the resultset.

Flimsy? Sure. But worth a thought. Honestly I'd much rather an "official" HasColumn method on IDataRecord.

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1  
I was going to suggest the same thing, GetOrdinal is great because the lookup is case insensitive, if it fails, it does a case sensitive look up. –  kd7 Dec 17 '08 at 0:16
9  
using exceptions for control logic? no no no –  Chad Grant May 1 '09 at 23:42
16  
There is one small thing that everyone overlooks when I originally posted this question...I asked the question on 12/8/08 and Matt posted his answer on 12/17/08. Everyone made a stink about catching an exception for control logic but did not provide a solid alternative solution until 5/1/09. That is why it was originally marked as the answer. I am still using this solution today. –  Michael Kniskern Dec 14 '10 at 15:32
10  
This will have a performance hit only if the column was not there. The other methods described will have a performance hit, and a larger performance hit, every single time. While it is generally bad practice to avoid using exception handling for flow of control, this solution should not be ruled out without first considering if it works in your case. –  Nick May 5 '11 at 15:22
1  
+1. I'm ok with "Don't use exception for control logic" as a broad design rule. It does not mean "avoid it at all cost". The answer is a very well documented workaround, and as @Nick says, the performance hit (if any..) only occurs when the column does not exists. –  Larry Nov 4 '13 at 13:26

Here is a working sample for Jasmin's idea:

var cols = r.GetSchemaTable().Rows.Cast<DataRow>().Select
    (row => row["ColumnName"] as string).ToList(); 

if (cols.Contains("the column name"))
{

}
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2  
THIS ONE DID WORK –  Marin Mar 30 '12 at 15:54

I wrote for Visual Basic users :

Protected Function HasColumnAndValue(ByRef reader As IDataReader, ByVal columnName As String) As Boolean
    For i As Integer = 0 To reader.FieldCount - 1
        If reader.GetName(i).Equals(columnName) Then
            Return Not IsDBNull(reader(columnName))
        End If
    Next

    Return False
End Function

I think this is more powerful and the usage is :

If HasColumnAndValue(reader, "ID_USER") Then
    Me.UserID = reader.GetDecimal(reader.GetOrdinal("ID_USER")).ToString()
End If
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If you read the question, Michael asked about DataReader, not DataRecord folks. Get your objects right.

Using a r.GetSchemaTable().Columns.Contains(field) on a DataRecord does work, but it returns BS columns (see screenshot below.)

To see if a data column exists AND contains data in a DataReader, use the following extensions:

public static class DataReaderExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Checks if a column's value is DBNull
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="dataReader">The data reader</param>
    /// <param name="columnName">The column name</param>
    /// <returns>A bool indicating if the column's value is DBNull</returns>
    public static bool IsDBNull(this IDataReader dataReader, string columnName)
    {
        return dataReader[columnName] == DBNull.Value;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Checks if a column exists in a data reader
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="dataReader">The data reader</param>
    /// <param name="columnName">The column name</param>
    /// <returns>A bool indicating the column exists</returns>
    public static bool ContainsColumn(this IDataReader dataReader, string columnName)
    {
        /// See: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/373230/check-for-column-name-in-a-sqldatareader-object/7248381#7248381
        try
        {
            return dataReader.GetOrdinal(columnName) >= 0;
        }
        catch (IndexOutOfRangeException)
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
}

Usage:

    public static bool CanCreate(SqlDataReader dataReader)
    {
        return dataReader.ContainsColumn("RoleTemplateId") 
            && !dataReader.IsDBNull("RoleTemplateId");
    }

Calling r.GetSchemaTable().Columns on a DataReader returns BS columns:

Calling GetSchemeTable in a DataReader

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Please explain down vote –  Levitikon Sep 27 '12 at 20:14
    
see comments under Matts answer –  nawfal Aug 8 '13 at 4:49
    
What do you mean by DataRecord does work, but it returns BS columns? You mean it runs (and gives wrong results)? –  nawfal Dec 12 '13 at 14:01
    
@nawfal See the screenshot in this answer. It does work in that .GetSchemaTable().Columns is a method off both DataReader and DataRecord. But the results of the method on a DataReader are irrelevant to the actual columns. –  Levitikon Dec 13 '13 at 11:59
    
Levi, I know that, and thanks for responding. does work is not a good word imo to state that. It gives the meaning, it works correctly. I was confused. I'll recommend and edit to: it doesn't work or it gives incorrect results.. Not nitpicking, was just concerned.. –  nawfal Dec 13 '13 at 12:01

This code corrects the issues that Levitikon had with their code: (adapted from: [1]: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.data.datatablereader.getschematable.aspx)

public List<string> GetColumnNames(SqlDataReader r)
{
    List<string> ColumnNames = new List<string>();
    DataTable schemaTable = r.GetSchemaTable();
    DataRow row = schemaTable.Rows[0];
    foreach (DataColumn col in schemaTable.Columns)
    {
        if (col.ColumnName == "ColumnName") 
        { 
            ColumnNames.Add(row[col.Ordinal].ToString()); 
            break; 
        }
    }
    return ColumnNames;
}

The reason for getting all of those useless column names and not the name of the column from your table... Is because your are getting the name of schema column (i.e. the column names for the Schema table)

NOTE: this seems to only return the name of the first column...

EDIT: corrected code that returns the name of all columns, but you cannot use a SqlDataReader to do it

public List<string> ExecuteColumnNamesReader(string command, List<SqlParameter> Params)
{
    List<string> ColumnNames = new List<string>();
    SqlDataAdapter da = new SqlDataAdapter();
    string connection = ""; // your sql connection string
    SqlCommand sqlComm = new SqlCommand(command, connection);
    foreach (SqlParameter p in Params) { sqlComm.Parameters.Add(p); }
    da.SelectCommand = sqlComm;
    DataTable dt = new DataTable();
    da.Fill(dt);
    DataRow row = dt.Rows[0];
    for (int ordinal = 0; ordinal < dt.Columns.Count; ordinal++)
    {
        string column_name = dt.Columns[ordinal].ColumnName;
        ColumnNames.Add(column_name);
    }
    return ColumnNames; // you can then call .Contains("name") on the returned collection
}
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Or in one line return r.GetSchemaTable().Rows.Cast<DataRow>().Select(x => (string)x["ColumnName"]).ToList(); :) –  nawfal Dec 12 '13 at 14:03
Hashtable ht = new Hashtable();
    Hashtable CreateColumHash(SqlDataReader dr)
    {
        ht = new Hashtable();
        for (int i = 0; i < dr.FieldCount; i++)
        {
            ht.Add(dr.GetName(i), dr.GetName(i));
        }
        return ht;
    }

    bool ValidateColumn(string ColumnName)
    {
        return ht.Contains(ColumnName);
    }
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Never seen a weirder use of HashTable :) Today you have HashSet<T> for the same purpose :) –  nawfal Nov 8 '13 at 17:46
    
Good one, it can be one-lined using LINQ. –  Larry Dec 9 '13 at 8:07

In one line, use this after your DataReader retrieval:

var fieldNames = Enumerable.Range(0, dr.FieldCount).Select(i => dr.GetName(i)).ToArray();

Then,

if (fieldNames.Contains("myField"))
{
    var myFieldValue = dr["myField"];
    ...
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Neither did I get GetSchemaTable to work, until I found this way.

Basically I do this:

Dim myView As DataView = dr.GetSchemaTable().DefaultView
myView.RowFilter = "ColumnName = 'ColumnToBeChecked'"

If myView.Count > 0 AndAlso dr.GetOrdinal("ColumnToBeChecked") <> -1 Then
  obj.ColumnToBeChecked = ColumnFromDb(dr, "ColumnToBeChecked")
End If
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public static bool DataViewColumnExists(DataView dv, string columnName)
{
    return DataTableColumnExists(dv.Table, columnName);
}

public static bool DataTableColumnExists(DataTable dt, string columnName)
{
    string DebugTrace = "Utils::DataTableColumnExists(" + dt.ToString() + ")";
    try
    {
        return dt.Columns.Contains(columnName);
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        throw new MyExceptionHandler(ex, DebugTrace);
    }
}

Columns.Contains is case-insensitive btw.

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To keep your code robust and clean, use a single extension function, like this:

    Public Module Extensions

        <Extension()>
        Public Function HasColumn(r As SqlDataReader, columnName As String) As Boolean

            Return If(String.IsNullOrEmpty(columnName) OrElse r.FieldCount = 0, False, Enumerable.Range(0, r.FieldCount).Select(Function(i) r.GetName(i)).Contains(columnName, StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase))

        End Function

    End Module
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Here is a one liner linq version of the accepted answer:

Enumerable.Range(0, reader.FieldCount).Any(i => reader.GetName(i) == "COLUMN_NAME_GOES_HERE")
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You can also call GetSchemaTable() on your DataReader if you want the list of columns and you don't want to have to get an exception...

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1  
There is some debate as to whether this works: stackoverflow.com/questions/373230/… –  bzlm Apr 8 '10 at 6:40
    
Well, it's always worked for me. –  Dave Markle Apr 8 '10 at 9:21
2  
It's a matter of DataReader versus DataRecord. GetSchemaTable is a method of both, but when used in DataReader its gets schema junk. –  Levitikon Sep 13 '11 at 18:27
    
@Levitikon what is a DataRecord? I cannot see such a type with GetSchemaTable method. –  nawfal Dec 12 '13 at 14:00

These answers are already posted here. Just Linq-ing a bit:

bool b = reader.GetSchemaTable().Rows
                                .Cast<DataRow>()
                                .Select(x => (string)x["ColumnName"])
                                .Contains(colName, StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase);
//or

bool b = Enumerable.Range(0, reader.FieldCount)
                   .Select(reader.GetName)
                   .Contains(colName, StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase);

The second one is cleaner, and much much faster. Even if you dont run GetSchemaTable every single time in the first approach, the lookup is going to be very slow.

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Here the solution from Jasmine in one line... (one more, tho simple!):

reader.GetSchemaTable().Select("ColumnName='MyCol'").Length > 0;
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In your particular situation (all procedures has the same columns except 1 which has additional 1 column), it will be better and faster to check reader. FieldCount property to distinguish between them.

const int NormalColCount=.....
if(reader.FieldCount > NormalColCount)
{
// Do something special
}

I know it is an old post but I decided to answer to help other in the same situation. you can also (for performance reason) mix this solution with the solution iterating solution.

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Please name the solution you are referring to. Which two solutions should be mixed? –  Pablo Karlsson 2 days ago

How about

if (dr.GetSchemaTable().Columns.Contains("accounttype"))
   do something
else
   do something

It probably would not be as efficient in a loop

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